Straightening a Table Saw Blade

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On 11/21/15 12:33 PM, Leon wrote:

He's used both so he would know. In the WWII world, folks might not care unless cutting thick.
For anyone listening in who doesn't use a WWII and hasn't used a good quality rip blade.... there's a huge difference, look into it.
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On 11/20/15 10:44 PM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

Me, too! I have the "Glue-Line" rip blade and the cut is usually just as they say, ready for joining.
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Yes, a time or two over the past 17 years.

I'm sure that would depend on the Servives performing the repair. FWIW Forrest Manufacturing does this and probably something they do routinely. Part of their sales pitch is that their places are manufactured to within certain tolerances. I'm pretty sure that a number of their blades need some flattening during that process. Anyway now is a good time mention the benefits of a regular kerf place. I have witnessed thin kerf blades that wobble enough that you can see it but some what corrects itself when running at normal speed but not cutting. Thin kerf blades simply are more likely to not remain flat and or deflect more than regular kerf blades.

Hard to say. It is a thin kerf blade and by nature more likely to need to be flattened in the future. Forrest charges by the time involved in the flattening process. You can request that they give you an estimate and or call you before performing the repair if the cost will be over X dollars. Every time I send my Forrest blades to be resharpened I request that the blades be brought back to factory specs and to call me if the repair will be over a certain amount.

You may also consider a regular kerf blade such as a Forrest. If you are talking 10" blade you can get a new one for about the price you mentioned for the Amana.

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Thanks ... Since, years ago, I unwisely bought my Unisaw with only a 1 ? ? HP motor. I opted to use thin kerf blades whenever possible. I use a vi bration damper and a dedicated rip blade and a dedicated trim blade.
This has worked well, and, in certain cases, I'll use a ⅛" kerf bla de when I need to.

.


I'll check that out

I do have a Forrest blade, but I decided to use rip blade for ripping and I get better results.
Also. it takes me less than a minute to change blades.
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FFWIW I used thin kerf on a Craftsman with just 1 hp. Then my re sharpening guy talked me into a good quality regular kerf. I never looked back. The quality regular kerf did fine but a little slower with 1 hp. But if you are happy, keep on keeping on. :-)

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On 11/14/2015 6:08 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

You must remove the zero clearance insert BEFORE you tilt the blade ... DAMHIKT.
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On Sat, 14 Nov 2015 08:12:03 -0600

so that is how they get bent
interesting
i was trying to think how a blade could be bent and it seems like it would be hard to do that from cutting unless maybe something was pushed in too fast and with too much force
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On 11/14/2015 12:15 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

Kick back can damage a blade, or in my case, the antifriction pads were knocked off and the fence was no longer parallel to the blade. My son was working on it, and I think he didn't release the lock all the way or for whatever reason. But the blade got bound in the piece.
Forrest did an excellent job.. Sorry Doug M that your experience was less than that.
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Jeff

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I did something much stupider than that: I neglected to tighten the nut onto the arbor. The blade spun freely and galled the inside of the hole. This caused the blade to stick to the mandrel, and I had to pry it off with much force.
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Woah. It will probably be less expensive to replace. That blade may never be the same again.
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On Saturday, November 14, 2015 at 4:08:29 AM UTC-8, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If by 'straightened' you mean 'whacked with a hammer to flatten it', yes. I've also used a dial gage to adjust individual teeth that got out-of-whack.
It'd be tricky on a good blade (I've only done this to cheap disposable items, which had storage-induced issues).
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On 11/14/2015 7:08 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I sent my forrest wwii to Forrest for sharpening. They straightened the plate too.
I think I paid about 45 for straightening and sharpening. Again I think. They will do all brands of blades.
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Jeff

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This is Neal Davis on Hammering Saw Plate.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXiZJpq-tIw

10" blades usually don't need hammering. Big saw blades are hammered and tensioned to be floppy. This way they run straight and true at speed.
Some 10" blades can be hammered. If the blade has a lot of scroll work on it, it will add to the cost. If the blade is coated the coating will need to removed so the Hammerman (Hammersmith, Sawfiler) can accurately read the blade.
On Saturday, November 14, 2015 at 4:08:29 AM UTC-8, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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