Stool back angle ???

Got a pair of high stools with backs to make.... It's going to have a cushion seat and a wood back... flat, no curve. I'm thinking the seat should be parallel to the ground and the back at about 10 degrees ?? Any advise on this.. thanks Jojo
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"dwolf" wrote in message

Generally the backs of chairs and benches are slanted back at 3 - 7 degrees ... I settled on 5 degrees as "just about right" for the ones I build.
FWIW ... due to a waterskiing accident, SWMBO is very particular about that particular angle, and the above seems to agree with her.
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I just finished chairs at 5 degrees and I feel there a bit stiff... one mistake I made on them was the seat has no angle... So for them my next step is to remove about 1/4 inch from the back legs... So you think 5 degrees with a flat seat for a stool ?

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"dwolf" wrote in message

It's what I settled on ... IMO, 10 degrees would be way too much, but this is really a subjective and personal preference.
I am in the process of finishing an A & C style bench with a flat seat and a 5 degree angled back (pictures on the last project page on my web site below ... but a couple of weeks behind).
Hauled it out of the shop a couple of days ago and put it in position in the kitchen while I finish the seat in the shop (the seat is going to be flat slatted, much like the back, and will require beaucoup M&T joints). I can tell you that everyone who has tried it with the temporary seat (plywood) has remarked upon how comfortable the back angle is (5 degrees) with the flat back and seat.
But once again, please yourself. I would feel almost laying down with 10 degrees, but that's just me.
In any event, good luck and let us know what you decide and how it works for you.
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Actually, your guess is closer than you might believe. For a comfortable chair, the seat should angle front to back by four or five degrees and the back angles away from the seat at four or five degrees...the total is eight or ten degrees. A slight curve in the crest rail and splats makes a world of difference in actual comfort, and the back is where you have the most opportunity for design...
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And how about a stool....? Thanks Joel

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I received your question, but the mail program returned the answer I sent. From your description, I did not envision a typical round stool, but more of a tall chair. With a fixed back, a seated person will tend to lean into it, and without a backward angle to the seat, the butt will slide. If you have a bandsaw, I can describe a simple method for cutting the curved crest rail...?
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The problem with the curve is it does have a crest rail but it also has a panel that goes between the crest and the seat... I might think about laminating that paned to a curve ?? but maybe not necessary for the design I have.. It's an Art Deco original design, going with other pieces I have already made for this client.... Nothing else has curves... The Seat does have a cushion, so I haven't decided if it will have an angle or sit flat... I went into a store an saw both options, but mostly flat. So far I'm thinking of a flat set, with cushion and a 8 degree flat back ??

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A usable curve for a 3/4 inch crest rail can be contained within the thickness of 5/4 stock...for a twelve inch rail at a thirty-six inch radius, that's a half inch of curve. A quarter-inch panel of solid stock, 6 or 8 inches wide, will have sufficent pliability to be tenoned in on the curve without ulterior effort...the panel will tell you which way it wants to curve.
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