Spindle Sanders?

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Hey all
I am contemplating buying a spindle sander for some repetitive contour sanding. Does anyone have recommendations on purchasing one in a price range of less than $300? I am looking at the Grizzly, Delta and Ridgid.
Thanks for your suggestions
Gary
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Fine Woodworking recently had an article on these. Check out: http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/ToolGuide/ToolGuidePDF.aspx?id '677
--
Stoutman
www.garagewoodworks.com
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Stoutman wrote:

This is the second or third time I recall that someone has posted a link to a FWW story that, when invoked, comes up with a short summary stating "membership required" in order to read.
Doesn't do me any good - I'm not a member. Nor, I suspect, are many who read this group.
In the future, I'd appreciate it if anyone posting such a link would at least let us know we have to be members to read it.
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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The story is referenced by FWW #188 which is still on the shelves. If you want to read the story go to your local Barnes and Noble. No membership required there.

Gary or anyone else interested, can either go to Barnes and Noble and read the article or he can buy a membership if interested. I also posted again with the results from the review article.

Larry, you have to be a member to read it online.
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Stoutman wrote:

And the link given was to an online site, not a magazine rack :-).
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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On Sun, 25 Feb 2007 11:39:29 -0500, "Gary E"

Read a very old FWW article (reprinted in their "Making Machines" book) on how turn the head of a cheap drillpress upside down, drive the quill feed shaft with a slow motor and crank and make your own.
Having recently skip-dived such a drill, I'm working on my own right now. It's a lot better than spending $400 !
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Oscillating is a very favororable feature as the paper lasts longer and you get a surface with fewer sanding marks. IMHO you do not want to cut corners here. Heavy helps keep the unit in place and a tilt table is helpful. In my shop the larger 3" diameter spindle is the one that gets the most use. I have the Jet Mid-Bench top model and am happy it although it is probably a bit out of your price range. Mine is too tall for a bench top and too short for the floor. It sets on a surface that is about 20" off the floor and its table top is about 36" off the floor. One with an induction motor makes it quiet and a pleasure to use with out hearing protection. You may find as I have that this tool can do multiple tasks that pop up that you normally would have used another tool for. Also very handy to have is a 12" disc sander. Great for mitering short pieces of wood safely. A bit on the high side of your budget but a very handy combination would be http://www.grizzly.com/products/G0529
Of the brands listed, this one looks like the Jet that I have except the Grizzly comes with the sand. I would go with this one over the Delta or the Ridgid. http://www.grizzly.com/products/G9922
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Agreed, I defeintely want a spindle sander which oscillates.

Good advice

Thanks for the advice, all good info.
Gary
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On Sun, 25 Feb 2007 14:59:46 -0500, "Gary E"

I don't know of any spindle sanders that of themselves require hearing protection--the shop vac on the other hand . . .

Most folks with the Ridgid seem to find that the belt is more generally useful than the spindles.

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The Ridgid and the PC #121 use a universal motor.
Noisier than an induction motor sander.
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My variety as well. Neat mod I made was to make an insert that will accept PC guides. Makes pattern sanding a nice option with the smaller spindles.
Only thing I'd change is to get a bit higher rate of oscillation. Other than that, great sander.
Belt types just never perform as well as a good plane, so that was not a factor in my decision, but the newer types seem to be headed there.
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I have the Ridgid oscillating belt/spindle sander and can give you my impressions. I have no direct experience with the others so I cannot do a comparative review.
The Ridgid tool is pretty easy to set up and works fine in my hobbyist workshop. I use it primarily for edge sanding in the belt sander configuration. It is quick to change belts or to switch to the spindle mode. Dust collection is OK with my shop vac hooked up to the exhaust port. It does a reasonable job for me, but is not a heavy duty tool.
It is reasonably sturdy is quite stable sitting on a workbench. The construction is pretty solid. The tilting table is convenient when sanding angled edges.
I recommend getting a tool with the oscillating motion rather than just a straight rotating spindle (or belt). The oscillation gives smoother results, closer to that of a random orbit sander, and also spreads out the wear on the sanding belt/sleeve.
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wrote:

I saw lots of plans to make homemade spindle sander, but I think the oscillating part is too important to give up, besides I already have attachments to have 2" diameter drum sander on my drill press.
Sturdiness is key, I believe plus what the maximum diameter of the drum it will receive.
Thanks
Gary
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wrote:

Robert,
I went to Home Depot yesterday to look at the Ridgid. I must say I'm disappointed that the only place to buy this is from Home Depot, and I also did not see any supplies for the Ridgid there ( a complaint I had seen on a review elsewhere) Where do you get you supplies for this sander?
Gary
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On Mon, 26 Feb 2007 08:57:26 -0500, "Gary E"

Ridgid is the Home Depot house brand for stationary power tools.

The sleeves are a standard size--Ryobi, Delta, Grizzly, etc 4-1/2" long sleeves all work fine. The belts are also standard 4x24 belts. The Ryobi sleeves that Home Depot sells as a set are about as inexpensive as you're going to get. The brands don't need to match any more than drill bits have to be the same brand as drills.
If all else fails, Klingspor has both belts and sleeves.
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Gary E wrote:

The spindles and belts seem like standard items sold at any decent woodworking supplier, or mail order places like Klingspoor or Amazon.
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On Sun, 25 Feb 2007 11:39:29 -0500, "Gary E"

The Wilton is identical to the Grizzly G0538 except for color, but qualifies for free shipping on amazon and for their discounts. I got it for about $100 shipped but they've since raised the price to match the G0538 and then raised the price on both. I have a pretty extensive review of it on amazon.
I've only ever once wished it had a tilting table. I just cut a piece of scrap at the appropriate angle and put the stock on that. It's light enough to carry around easily, but heavy enough that it doesn't move around.
However at the full price of $150 I think you're probably better off going with the ridgid for another $50. A small oscillating belt would be nice to have, and you just can't get that on any other machine AFAIK without forking out for a huge edge sander. But if you can catch one of amazon's deals and get it for $100-125 then it's a great value.
-Leuf
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wrote:

Leuf
I looked at the Wilton, and it seems identical to the Grizzly. And the price is no longer $100, but $149, identical to the Grizzly. Are these sanders manufactured by the same company and just rebranded? Where do you get supplies for your Wilton? Does it have a plastic table?
The other sander I am leaning towards is the Ridgid, because of the high marks by FWW, convertible belt sander, 3/4" miter slot. It does not take 3" drums, but I got the impression you had trouble with that size on your sander.
Thanks for your assistance.
Gary
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On Mon, 26 Feb 2007 09:01:43 -0500, "Gary E"

With regard to 3 inch drums, the diameter of the big end of the belt transport is 3 inches if you really need that radius available for anything.
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The larger the spindle, the faster it will sand and is less likely to gouge. I find that I use the 3" drum more than all others combined by a ratio of probably of 5 to 1. I was not sure about the larger 3" spindle when buying my sander, it's was an optional accessory, but I am very glad I got it. It comes in handy when doing jobs other than sanding inside radiuses.
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