Speaking of Glue

I have used Gorilla glue for some projects, and like what I see.
However I have a concern about converting to Gorilla glue. I make a lot of picture frames and stretchers. Most are standard Fur, pine, or the generic "White wood" 1"-material ie 3/4". I miter the corners, cut biscuit slots, and glue them together.
Gorilla Glue expands as it drys.
If Gorilla Glue is used in the miter slots with biscuits, will the glue expand sufficiently to split the 1" material?
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On 1/10/2012 1:41 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Why on earth would you choose (I presume since you're talking of expanding) a polyurethane glue for such purposes?
There's nothing to be gained and there certainly isn't any need for the waterproof properties to justify the cost and the extra cleanup effort vis a vis a water-based glue.
Plus, it takes moisture _from_ the surrounding wood to aid in curing while the plan is with biscuits for the water _in_the_glue_ to expand them to make a tight fit in the slot.
All in all, I say "no" (even trying to discount my bias against polyurethane glues in general).
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On 1/10/2012 12:54 PM, dpb wrote:

job.
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"Keith Nuttle" wrote:

Compared to decent laminating epoxy, it doesn't even qualify as low end garbage, IMHO.
Lew
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On 1/10/2012 4:16 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote: ...

If it only lived up to the name. :(
Of course, it's not Gorilla's fault; it's just the nature of the beast (so to speak, wink, wink :) ) w/ a polyurethane glue. All other manufacturers' acts the same way re: foaming, etc. (and is equivalent in strength (or weakness) as well).
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See Gorilla Glue on ABPW.
Lew
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On 1/10/2012 5:43 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

No can do, sorry...this newsserver doesn't do binaries and I'm not going elsewhere... :)
What's it show/say?
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dpb wrote the following:

A faux ad for GG. A gorilla hand holding the bottle of GG. The caption is: "Gorilla Glue For mending your gorilla". Didn't even get a chuckle out of me.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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Many different published tests have shown Gorilla as usually the leaset effective for wood joints.
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On 1/10/2012 5:26 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

OTOH, Gorilla duct tape is really good. Maybe use it in place of Gorilla Glue?
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On 1/11/2012 2:47 AM, Just Wondering wrote:

Well, it used to be simple that "Gorilla glue" was the polyurethane product. Now they also have a wood glue so the brand w/o the type isn't definitive.
As noted elsewhere, polyurethane glues in general don't match the strength for wood-wood joints of the PVA glues so it isn't Gorilla's fault there's doesn't, either. It fits in the class of the particular product as do the others on the market. If it weren't for the catchy name and massive ad campaign, nobody would have ever "discovered" its existence.
I've not tried their duct tape nor the wood glue (I've yet to see the latter on a store shelf locally to have the opportunity).
--
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Fine Woodworking did a test of various glues using bridle joints as their test joints. Gorilla Glue did not fare well. Regular old PVA woodworking glue is what to use for interior joints on non-oily wood.
However, the most important thing I gleaned from the article is that for PVA glues the critical factor is clamping pressure. LOTS of pressure. It's almost impossible to put too much pressure. The strongest joints were made with freshly-planed (not roughened for "grip") joint surfaces, a moderate amount of glue, and lots of even pressure. It has changed the way I work and for once I can make those airtight joints I always sought.
And I have an excuse to get even more clamps!
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On 1/14/2012 10:42 AM, scritch wrote:

Indeed, pressure is good and the idea of pressure "glue starving" is overblown. I don't have the link otomh, but there was also an article in FWW not terribly long ago about clamping pressure based on research from the Forest Products Lab. While it was done for commercial applications in mind, its recommendations for optimal clamping pressure were/are mind-boggling in terms of actual clamping pressures that produced optimal results, indeed.
--


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"dpb" wrote in message
On 1/14/2012 10:42 AM, scritch wrote:

Indeed, pressure is good and the idea of pressure "glue starving" is overblown. I don't have the link otomh, but there was also an article in FWW not terribly long ago about clamping pressure based on research from the Forest Products Lab. While it was done for commercial applications in mind, its recommendations for optimal clamping pressure were/are mind-boggling in terms of actual clamping pressures that produced optimal results, indeed.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- It says on the Titebond page to clamp at 125 to 250 PSI.
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On 1/15/2012 12:05 AM, CW wrote:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Titebond is not the only glue used here.
ANY epoxy can be over clamped and starved.
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On 1/15/2012 1:52 AM, Richard wrote: ...

Yes, but this subthread had devolved into the PVA clamping pressure recommendation of the FWW article to be specific...
--
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On 1/15/2012 9:05 AM, dpb wrote:

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On 1/10/2012 1:41 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

That would depend on which Gorilla Glue you use. Try using the White Gorilla glue vs. the polyurethane.
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Stop looking. I wasted a bunch of nice material using that crap when it first hit the market. Never again. Just use regular Titebond 2 or 3.
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