Source For Wood Screws (For Hinges)

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I am going to replace the hollow interior doors in my house with solid pine. In the hinge section at Home Despot, Stanley only has #9 screws at 1" length. I would think that, even with 3 hinges, I want longer screws so that some or all go into the studs, but HD only has #8 and #10 at various lengths in the screw aisle.
#10 doesn't look too bad on the hinge, but I prefer #9 if I can get them, since they fit perfect flush on the hinge. Anyone have a good source for these? Need brass Phillips.
Also, I am curious if I should consider the square drive (Tor-x ?) screws on the hinges.
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http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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carry
masses
Thanks. Looks like I'll have to bookmark that site. When they say brass, do they mean real brass, or brass finish? I wonder if brass will be too soft?
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Buck Turgidson asks:

Go for plated brass, over steel. Much, much, much stronger when working with wild Indians, especially as the Indians get bigger.
Charlie Self "In our civilization, and under our republican form of government, intelligence is so highly honored that it is rewarded by exemption from the cares of office." Ambrose Bierce
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I'm guessing real brass. Of course, there are different qualities as I found out a couple of months ago. I'd be very careful driving brass screws. You want to have a proper sized pilot hole. You may want to drive in a steel screw first, then the brass or at least use some lube. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome .
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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Buck Turgidson writes:

I don't know where you'll find #9. McFeely's has #10 solid brass up to 1-3/4" long, #8 the same. They've got silicon bronze in lengths to 3" in #10. If that doesn't reach your framing, then there's a problem. These are boatbuilding screws and are not cheap (100 #10 x 3" is about $38.50, plus shipping).
I doubt you really want solid brass, anyway. Plated is stronger. McFeely's has those in #8 x 2" for $6.89 per 100, or you might try ayellow zinc plated flat head, #10 x 3" at $10.31 per hundred. Check www.mcfeelys.com
These are square drive, NOT Torx.
Charlie Self "In our civilization, and under our republican form of government, intelligence is so highly honored that it is rewarded by exemption from the cares of office." Ambrose Bierce
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pine.
Hmmm...ONLY concerned about screws long enough to go into the studs, but not about the screws that go into the doors? Think about it. ;-)
My takes are:
1) Surely the hollow doors have only two hinges and you are adding a hinge, another 3 screws on each side of the hinge to handle the extra weight. If so, then my guess is that 1" screws are enough. 2) But if 1" #9 ISN'T enough, then go to a full-service hardware store to (1) look for longer screws and/or (2) look for a different brand of hinge that accepts the #10 screw.
Jim Stuyck
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Jim Stuyck wrote:

Think about it further. The screw that goes into the door goes directly into structure. The screw that goes into the stud has to go through the door frame, first and then possibly a block or even an air space before it gets to the stud that is the actual structural member. Hence longer screws are usually needed on that side.

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--John
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so
various
screws
Yes, I did think about it (before posting). The "single long screw" per hinge, on the stud side, is done on exterior doors for added security, so that the door frame can't be broken loose (or simply broken). In my experience, such precautions aren't taken on interior doors. My thinking remains that three screws per hinge, into the frame on interior doors is sufficient. Take the 1" screws the poster located. They go into only 1/4" less material on the frame side (OK, maybe 5/16" less) than those on the door side.
Perhaps an experiment is in order? Hang the door with three hinges, each with three 1" screws into the frame, then hang on it. See what happens. ;-) Don't even need to do it with those solid doors, just hang on the doors already there (with two hinges?). Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
I surely am happier to discuss screws and hinges and doors rather than the "f-word."
Jim Stuyck
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wrote:

and so we progress....
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Sounds like a plan. I'll report back on the results....;)
I plan on using long screws on both the frame and the door. I mean...why not have the added insurance....? Plus I have 2 boys who are like wild Indians.
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Buck Turgidson wrote:

You can always use drywall or deck screws. HD has plenty of these though the color may not be what you want. Typically only one long screw per hinge will be enough.
Gary
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hinge
Deck Screw would be Ok but a dry wall screw would not be a good choice. Way too brittle and not much more bite than a nail in this application.
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#9 @ 1" is plenty. Just be sure to pre-drill - having filled questionable holes with Titebond2 and hardwood toothpicks - so as not to split the jamb...and torque the screws to the perfect tightness.
Brass is fine.
If the jambs are installed correctly hinge screws into the studs is worse than overkill. If the jambs aren't shimmed and true, screwing into the studs will simply distort the frame.
--
Doors - Locks - Weatherstripping
POB 250121 Atlanta GA 30325
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Interesting. Never thought of that. Thanks for advice. I guess I will try as you suggest and do the first door with the 1" and see how it seems. Although I guess you never really know until it falls off the hinges....;)
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Using a "Vix"-type bit or a sure hand, make sure the screws' heads are flush and square, and that there's no "hingebind," and they'll swing properly forever.
--
Doors - Locks - Weatherstripping
POB 250121 Atlanta GA 30325
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Had never heard of a vix bit before, but I looked on Amazon, and they seem like just what I need, and a good investment for the money.
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Make sure you get the hex shaft...the orginal Vix had a round one and I have no use for it.
--
Doors - Locks - Weatherstripping
POB 250121 Atlanta GA 30325
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Thanks. Looks like the ones at amazon have the round shaft. I'll keep looking.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
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