Some results of experimenting with soap stone. (Prelude to carving details in wood.)

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Understood and knew all that. What I showed may have only covered 25%-50% needed parts list. What I really want to know is if the type of stuff I did link too were of sufficient quality to begin build what one would consider to be an above average CNC machine. Guess the question should have been do these parts qualify as a really decent starting point or should I be aiming higher?
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snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com said:

Oops - Sorry about that. The link you provided seems a bit pricey but I didn't look up the impedance/torque/brand of the stepper motors. One of the more popular vendors among the CNC groups is: http://www.hobbycnc.com /
MSC and McMaster-Carr are also reasonable sources for ACME lead screws and nuts, either solid or ball, and machined steel drill shafts and bushings of every description. Carbon steel lead screws wear fast but are acceptable for experimenters: http://www.mscdirect.com /
http://www.mcmaster.com /
Selection of the stepper motors, controllers and power supply, along with the purely mechanical components, are dependant on what speeds, loads, and accuracy you require out of the machine. Planning is essential. I'd check out the CNC groups such as CNCZone for hints and tricks on DIYing a CNC machine.
There is tons of software available. As for controller software, TurboCNC is sort of free for non-commercial use but runs under DOS. Master5 is another and runs under Windoze and includes a device driver that supposedly deals with the Win API exclusive port access issue which causes inconsistent timing. (Steppers are a bit jerky.) Yeager Automation used to offer controller software but the link I have is dead.
Then you have ArtCam, GibbsCAM, DelCAM, MasterCAM, NCPlot and a few other G-Code generators that plug into popular CAD programs such as SolidWorks. Other programs will display your g-code and toolpaths in visual 3D form so that you can check for tool interference and such.
FWIW,
Greg G.
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On Nov 9, 7:00 pm, snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

I find these places helpful:
http://www.cnczone.com / http://www.vectric.com/forum / http://www.talkshopbot.com/forum/discus.cgi
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snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

WTF? The rendering at the top of the page shows two x-axis steppers and a z-axis stepper and right below it is a 3-motor kit. How about a y-axis stepper?
What Greg said, and I've had good experiences with
http://www.hobbycnc.com/products/hobbycnc-pro-driver-board-packages /
I have their 4-axis package with their 23-205-DS8 steppers and like it.
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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wrote:

Hey Morris, don't chew me out. I barely know what a 2-axis stepper does. I'm guessing a 4-axis model adds a few more directions to that equation.
Thanks for the link, I'll check it out.
By the way Morris (and Robatory and anyone else who wants to take part), I'm going to be picking your brains while I build a list of what to buy. And then, you can tell me what to add or subtract. That's after some considerable discussion.
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snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

Oops - sorry, I wasn't chewing you out. They caught me by surprise by offering to sell a four motor plan set right beside a three motor package. Fried my calculator, so to speak.

Ok. Might be a good idea to lurk a bit on the CNC metalworking group - those guys have a lot of good experience and occasionally post photos of interesting projects (for example: a cnc-milled steel boob for a bra manufacturer).
Be warned that this CNC stuff can make you lose sleep, think weird thoughts, and twist your sense of humor in strange ways. If you haven't seen the video of robatoy's chicken spinner, you should. I, myself, have kept most of my marbles in the basket - but I'm still working on my weapons-grade CNC pie thrower...
:)
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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[snipped some good advice from Morris for Dave.]
but wait! There's more!

Which begs the questions: "What kind of pie?" and "How far?"
I'm surprised jo4hn isn't doing the CNC boogie yet. He's used to talking to parcels full of electronics from far, far awaaaayyy!
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"Robatoy" wrote:
Which begs the questions: "What kind of pie?" and "How far?" ----------------------------------------------------- This one will work.
It's from America's Test Kitchens as modified by me.
Easy and delightful. (Only has top crust)
Leave it in the skillet when used as a projectile. -----------------------------------------------------
Flavorful Skillet Apple Pie
Serves 6 to 8
Crust Ingredients:
+1 Cup, Unbleached all-purpose flour (5 ounces), plus more for + dusting work surface +1 Tbl, Sugar +1/2 tps, Salt +2 Tbl, Shortening , chilled +6 Tbl, Cold unsalted butter (3/4 Stick), cut into 1/4-inch pieces + 3-4 Tbl, Ice water
+ 1 egg white , lightly beaten + 2 tps, Sugar
Crust Directions:
Pulse flour, sugar, and salt in food processor until combined.
Add shortening and process until mixture has texture of coarse sand, about ten 1-second pulses.
Scatter butter pieces over flour mixture and process until mixture is pale yellow and resembles coarse crumbs, with butter bits no larger than small peas, about ten 1-second pulses.
Transfer mixture to medium bowl.
Sprinkle 3 tablespoons ice water over mixture.
With blade of rubber spatula, use folding motion to mix.
Press down on dough with broad side of spatula until dough sticks together, adding up to 1 tablespoon more ice water if dough does not come together.
Turn dough out onto sheet of plastic wrap and flatten into 4-inch disk. Wrap dough and refrigerate 30 minutes, or up to 2 days, before rolling out.
(If dough is refrigerated longer than 1 hour, let stand at room temperature until malleable.)
Filling Ingredients:
+ 1/2 Cup, Apple cider + 1/3 Cup, Maple syrup + 2 Tbl, Fresh lemon juice from 1 lemon + 2 tps, Cornstarch + 1/8 tps, Ground cinnamon + 2 Tbl, Unsalted butter + 2 1/2 Lbs, Sweet apples and tart apples (about 6 medium), peeled, + cored, halved, and cut into 1/2-inch-thick wedges (see note)
Note:
Use a combination of sweet, crisp apples such as Golden Delicious and firm, tart apples such as Cortland, Empire or Granny Smith.
Filling Directions:
Whisk cider, syrup, lemon juice, cornstarch, and cinnamon together in medium bowl until smooth.
Heat butter in 10" cast iron chicken fryer over medium-high heat.
When foaming subsides, add apples and cook, stirring 2 or 3 times until apples begin to caramelize, about 5 minutes.
(Do not fully cook apples)
Remove pan from heat, add cider mixture, and gently stir until apples are well coated.
Set aside to cool slightly.
4. TO ASSEMBLE AND BAKE:
+ 1 egg white , lightly beaten + 2 tps, Sugar
Adjust oven rack to upper-middle position (between 7 and 9 inches from heating element) and heat oven to 500 degrees.
Roll out dough on lightly floured work surface, or between 2 large sheets of plastic wrap, to 11-inch circle.
Roll dough loosely around rolling pin and unroll over apple filling.
Brush dough with egg white and sprinkle with sugar.
With sharp knife, gently cut dough into 6 pieces by making 1 vertical cut followed by 2 evenly spaced horizontal cuts (perpendicular to first cut).
Bake until apples are tender and crust is a deep golden brown, about 20 minutes.
Let cool 15 minutes; serve.
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wrote:

No problem, do that already.

Don't have one as many people here will attest to.

You mean how to create a CNC built pie trebuchet?
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Hmmm... what I see, is 2 y axis steppers, one z axis stepper and no X axis stepper.
Okay, I'm being a dick here... but for me, I operate the table from the end, so the long axis is Y, the across axis is X.
I do have another settings file which flips everything 90 degrees...but my brain doesn't work that way..for some reason.
I have said this before... I don't think like other people. <G>
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On Nov 9, 5:16 pm, snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

For openers, it is a lightweight project, but all the rules are the same, Whether you're throwing around a 10HP across a 10-ft table or a 1 hp minirouter on a table-top. Up, down, sideways. back and forth pretty much sums it up. Small table-top devices can be a hoot to work/play with and can come up with some pretty cool results. It is obvious that duty and project size determine your needs.
If there is one thing that I read, consistently, is that brushed router motors (aside from being noisy) are not really designed to run for long periods of time. The duty cycle is ...what.. 1/2 hour max, in a router table? Spindles will run for weeks on end and are designed to do so. But... would you hang an expensive spindle on a MDF frame, and then try to push it around with 240 oz/in steppers? It seems that the whole CNC thing goes up in doubles. You can have a lot of fun for about a g-note. To notice a markedly better performance, 2K. Then 4, 8, 16, 32... you get the picture. You can have a lot of fun for $3K US.. http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=19666&source=googleps . Comes with Vectric V-Carve Pro (Aspire's kid brother) As Greg pointed out, you're nowhere near done by buying that kit. The rest really adds up in a hurry.
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On Mon, 9 Nov 2009 17:29:05 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

Looks like a nice unit, but I'd prefer to build one myself considering that all the parts, pieces and documentation are available. It's the best way for me to learn.
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On Mon, 9 Nov 2009 08:24:54 -0800 (PST), the infamous Robatoy

Here's what happens to yaks who don't play by my rules: I hand 'em their head http://fwd4.me/3aD

Double it for the next set of pomposities. And start marking off that Bucket List, boy!
A friend just sent this to me, entitled "Deer for breakfast, anyone?" http://www.snotr.com/video/2772 ROTFLMAO!
-- The Smart Person learns from his mistakes. The Wise Person learns from the mistakes of others. And then there are all the rest of us... -----------------------------------------------------
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Robatoy wrote:

Looks pretty decent. What spindle speed went along with the 2"/sec feed? How long did it take, and did you do it _all_ with the same 1/16" bit? (I think I'd have been tempted to hog away the material around the lighthouse with a 1/2" square-end bit.)
A second pass with a 1/64" bit might allow finer detail, and a third pass with a V-bit would allow signing each brick :)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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18,000 rpm. I took the 1/2 hogging endmill down to 12,000

Less than hour including changing the bits. 3 bits.

3 toolpaths. One 1/2" hog, one 1/4" cleanup hog and then the rest with the .0625 ball nose. The 1/4" end mill created most of the shape so the ballnose didn't have to cut much deeper than 1/8"

Indeed. The V-bit inserts, both the 90 and 60 degree ones go to a 'real' point. The stepper resolution would limit detail at that point. The run-out on the spindle doesn't wiggle the indicator needle.. Period.
The software allows me to set the detail resolution normal, 3x the data and 7 x the data. This was done at 3x. Stepover set at 40%
You know what a Canuckistani quarter looks like, eh? LOL

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Robatoy wrote:

That's pretty good. I suspect the 40% stepover helped a /lot/ with the runtime.

Hmm - ready to build a machine with a bit more resolution yet? :)

As a matter of fact, I /do/. Have a bright shiny one right here. I still like the bi-metal (center hasn't fallen out of this one), but my favorite is still the $50 maple leaf. :)
Methinks you might be a bad influence on diggerop - by this time next year we may be looking at the Sydney Opera House in soapstone. :)
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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I can just change out the steppers. The drivers and all that are up to that. I'm basically pushing the envelope to see if any of that would make sense.

You haven't bought anything with that 50-dollar coin yet? It'd make a nice tip after a big fancy meal, wouldn't it?

Yea... just a matter of time. He's asking questions already. I find that whole technology very challenging and rewarding. Just wish I had bought a bigger/better/3-head machine..yadda yadda yadda...<smirk>

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Robatoy wrote:

I predict it will...

It would, but it'll stay in the little plaque on my desk. I'm not a collector or hoarder, but it's one of the three prettiest coins I have (the others are a Saudi sovereign and a Dutch 2-1/2 Gulden coin).

I've been looking for exc^h^h^hreasons for needing a 7-axis machine...
...and wondering if it could be built on the cheap. :)
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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On Mon, 09 Nov 2009 11:53:55 -0600, the infamous Morris Dovey

Just do 3 things:
1) Line up customers for output from the machine.
2) Pry your credit card out and do the one buy. (I just did that with the computer. This old one is dying and I needed to upgrade, so I went $555.97 into hock for a new one.)
3) Make the parts and rake in the cashish.
(Oh, if only it were that easy...)
I just won an eBay auction for a new book, _The 4-hour Work Week_. I'll be [five, five, five] shortly, I hope. ;)
-- The Smart Person learns from his mistakes. The Wise Person learns from the mistakes of others. And then there are all the rest of us... -----------------------------------------------------
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Morris Dovey said:

Does your software support half or quarter stepping? Not perfect, but it might attain more detail.

What kind of mill do you have? Or did I already ask that... D'oh!

Got a box full of coins from various countries, including the bimetal coin referenced. I imagine that was an expensive coin to mint and didn't know they fell apart! Figures those drunken Canuckistanians would come up with a coin that literally lost value in your pocket. Oh, wait, that's the US.

And that would be So Cool.
Greg G.
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