SketchUp7 users -"Dynamic" Kitchen Cabinet Face Frame components

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Been playing around with creating "dynamic components", using that new feature now available in SketchUp7-Pro.
Below is a file that contains two .skp files, one for Base Cabinet FF's, and one for Wall Cabinet FF's. (Be sure to open any folder if it downloads that way):
http://e-woodshop.net/files/DC-FaceFrame.zip
If you're a SketchUp7 user, you might want to give these a try and let me know how they work for you.
(Note: you will want to "import" into an open file. On some systems you also to may have to "explode" the component itself _once_ after its loaded into SU to the get the "component" to by dynamic ... but try it first.)
~The Base Cabinet face frame "component" should respond to a user selected "Cabinet Width" list box, in industry standard 3" increments, or you can "scale" the component to any desired WIDTH using the "scale tool".
~ The Wall Cabinet "component" should respond to both user selected "Cabinet Width" and "Cabinet Height" list box, in industry standard 3" increments, or you can "scale" the component to any desired WIDTH and HEIGHT using the "scale tool".
Since I always build my face frames first, then assemble the sides, top and bottom onto them, this is a useful tool for determining cabinet WIDTHS when designing a kitchen, and to see what will fit where, or resizing and/or scaling/snapping into unoccupied wall or floor spaces you need to fill with cabinet.
But either way you build your cabinets, you may find the ability to dimension, or scale, cabinet face frames handy.
This is now especially true if you want to generate a face frame cutlist from your model and you also own CutList Plus.
The "Cutlist 4" Sketchup plug-in linked below, is specifically designed to work with CutList Plus ... damn nifty!
http://www.box.net/shared/m9ryf1l0ni
This is my first try with DC's, so let me know if something doesn't work, and any comments welcome.
Thanks,
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Welcome to the world of paramentric design.
In my real job I am in the 3D CAD business. Parametric design was a revolution for this industry 20 years ago. With complete parametrics you can embed an amazing amount of intelligence into one base design. They can be linked to spreadsheets, can hide and multiple parts and features, matain ratios or more complex rules, nest one design inside anothjer and drive changes up through the design; very cool stuff.
This was initially only available in the $20-$50k type software. The second revolution was the "desktop" or "mid-range" solid modelers in the $2-$8k proce range. Now I guess R3 is in Sketchup. Too cool.
I think pretty soon the $2-$8k guys are going to have a hard time seeling their stuff when their only real differentiation is being harder to use. ;^)

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SonomaProducts.com wrote:

Methinks SketchUp may have a ways to go yet. :)
I discovered an interesting "feature" this morning and will post to abpw. It doesn't like to make a hole through material that already has a hole in it.
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DeSoto Solar
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product which hopefully will entice the curious into trying real CAD software. That is especially true when you're trying to make the link between CAD and CAM. Having said that, for the price (even for the Pro version) SketchUp appears to be an excellent value.
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"Robatoy" wrote

Don't look now, Rob, but your lack familiarity with the program is showing ... SketchUp has always been upfront about NOT being "CAD software". :)

All the Pro version does is add advanced printing, exporting, importing, and presentation capabilities. Other than the ability to create dynamic components, and the above mentioned, there is no functional difference between the free and Pro versions.
Any tool is only as good as the craftsman who wields it ... it is always a mistake to sell something short on the basis of cursory knowledge.
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I am the first to agree that I have yet to delve into all of the host of features that SketchUp offers. I , frankly, haven't had the need. So your assesment of my lack of familiarity is sound. Somewhat. And yet, my grandmother's wisdom haunts me: "I don't know how to lay eggs, but I sure know when one shouldn't be eaten." I am still somewhat curious how someone, like yourself, who has shown a solid working knowledge of other software has bolted onto the SketchUp product. This is not a critique, but a question. You were a TurboCAD user at one time, were'nt you? Why the change? I have never been one to stay with a system/software 'just because'. If that were true, wtf am I married 3 times? I am willing to change and learn. I just don't see SketchUp as a path to growth, unlike TurboCAD which ate least teaches CAD-style conventions.
Am I way off here?

I agree, but why change a horse in the middle of a stream? There must be real advantage to adopting SketchUp over Turbo. If there is, I don't see it. And when it comes to wielding tools in the CAD and 3D modelling world, I hold my own quite well. SketchUp leaves me wanting more. Like NURBs. Like extrusions along rails. Like sweeps along bezier paths. Skinning and a full set of Bolean functions and a full set of rendering tools. And after all that, a true export ability that all programs can understand and parse. And don't get me started on infinite lighting sources and radiosity. Textures in all their photo-realistic glory.
SketchUp has never made claims to fit my bill. They don't. But if you're going to learn conventions, they should be cross-platform, and adhere to some standard which is transportable.
Honestly, dude... nothing personal.
r
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Nice link, thank you
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"Any tool is only as good as the craftsman who wields it"
Here here, good addition to my Grandpa's favorite "Its a poor workman what blames his tools."
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Morris Dovey wrote:

Ah, that explains it. I saw the posting and was wondering how you got those pipes drawn in the center there. I'll have to try that with VariCAD, I don't think that would be an issue.
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And methinks the operator may have a ways to go to understand how to operate the program. :)

Like I said on apbw, this is elementary ... send me the file and I'll be glad to show you how to do it. :)
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"Morris Dovey" wrote

Here you go, Bro ... make a cylinder "component" with diameter of the hole you want, poke it though the curved surfaces where you want the hole(s), then use the "intersect with model" function, then erase the parts you don't want.
When you know how, it takes longer to draw the box and cylinder than to get holes in the curved surfaces ... about a three minute job. :)
http://www.e-woodshop.net/files/CurvedFaces.jpg
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Yup. You can coerce and cajole it into doing much of what you might want, much of the time. It's great for what it is, but much of the time, sooner or later it bogs down and I'm fighting it to do what I want rather than what it wants. That's more a compliment than a detraction or dismissal. Sketchup *almost* allows me to do useful work. A few more versions and a bit more development will get it there.
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"MikeWhy" wrote

That's too bad ... In a nutshell, I've made woodworking pay a lot more since wielding SU than any other software design program to date. I can't wait for "a few more versions and a bit more development" to make even more $.
:)
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It's good, and it's fast for the initial rough out. There's still room for the middleweight systems. Mostly, it's the lack of "history" and committing to details too soon. I can't easily go back a few steps and adjust a smidge and then roll it forward again. Other times, it's the inferencing that guesses wrong and won't be corrected. Overall, though, it's a remarkably useful tool as it is, a huge step toward empowering the normal person to sketch up and document his world. For that alone, I'm very sure history will speak well of Google's achievements in these years.
So, what's your revenue stream with CAD? Are you just better able to communicate ideas? Save time by thinking through the details? How is SU making you $$?
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"MikeWhy" wrote

Google is just standing on the shoulders of giants ... they bought out the company that created it.

Just a current example that's being worked on, with a bit of history behind it following ... caution, it's a 1.3mb download:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/files/Kitchen-wall adjusted12-08.zip
The cabinets for this kitchen will be started in another week to ten days. The client lives in Austin, 170 miles from my shop, and I live in Houston. I've seen her only once in the two months since the design started, and most of that time was waiting on sinks and appliances to be purchased so the cabinets could be designed around them and fit into the space.
With the exception of the downdraft venting system for the stove top, which she has yet to be purchase (thus the real stove top model just sitting on top of the island counter top), the other appliances and sink are the actual products themselves from models taken off manufacturer's website and imported into SketchUp ... IOW, what she actually sees _is_ what she's getting, with her appliances in place.
Currently I'm waiting to finish the double oven cabinet and island cabinet design, but other than that, she has made her door and drawer front choices, where she wanted the appliances, where she wanted shelves, where she wanted the pantry, everything ... decisions all made by viewing the SketchUp model as I make her changes and put it online for her to download.
SketchUp is free ... she runs a Mac, no problem.
Mid design, she decided she wanted a kitchen "hutch", told me what she wanted, moved the location twice .. no problem, and where you see the "hutch" is the final spot. (maybe). :)
A side note with regard to the "kitchen hutch", I've already have a commission to build another, but stand alone, based solely on a relative having seen the one in the SketchUp kitchen model!
This kitchen is not one of my bigger kitchens, but will retail in excess of $60K, easily ... it is the direct the product of long distance collaboration using SketchUp, while many other projects are ongoing, much of the design done in the evening while SWMBO watches TV and I sit in an easy chair with my laptop, using a FREE program that more than gets the job done for what I need it for! :)
I could of spent $5K easily on another 3D "CAD" program, but I would still be learning the software months from now, instead of making money with it.
You asked ... :)
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Sorry damn spell checker did not like that URL:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/files/Kitchen-wall adjusted12-08.zip
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download?
I'm intrigued by the description ...
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Best regards
Han
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Han wrote:

Put < > around the link. The space between wall and adjusted is the problem.
<http://www.e-woodshop.net/files/Kitchen-wall adjusted12-08.zip>
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-MIKE-

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-MIKE- wrote:

Even that is getting screwed up... some browsers will delete spaces in urls. You might want to put an underscore "_" in place of a space, in the original link. You must change it on your server, too, however. Like this: http://www.e-woodshop.net/files/Kitchen-wall_adjusted12-08.zip
For now, it works if you cut-n-paste.
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-MIKE-

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then I could download the file.
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Han
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