Sketchup Problem

I got volunteered to help somebody learn Sketchup. Which will be quite interesting since I have spent all of 30 minutes with the program.
What is being done is quite simple. Antique radios, etc. Nothing fancy, If he can draw a box with some knobs and an old circular radio dial, it will be enough. And some very simple circuit diagrams. Again, nothing fancy. It ain't art. Just some diagrams to help a hobbyist.
Soooo...., here are my questions.
1) Any collection of electronic components, old radios or circuitry available any where? Again, this is old stuff, tubes, early transistors, big knobs, radio dials, etc. No need for circuit board design or anything like that.
2) Any words of wisdom to become sketchup semi-proficient within a few days?
I don't feel all that good about my honey volunteering me, but I need to get some basic sketchup skills together for a number of projects. So, I won't bitch too much.
And hey, those old radios had wooden cabinets. Soooo, it is sorta woodworking related. ;-)
Thanks,
Lee
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On Mar 8, 3:01 pm, "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote:

http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/search?q=radio+tubes http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/search?q=radio+old You can download a model and cannibalize it for parts.

There are a number of tutorials online that will help you avoid the more common pitfalls. Rule one is to start making groups out of things right from the get go so they won't glue to other drawn elements. When things that should be independent glue together it makes editing them a bitch.
This is Google's intro to SketchUp tutorial. It's nice to be able to use the application to learn the application. http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/details?mid=a00309dbdab49ffb545172f70efed474
But there are other video tutorials besides Google's: http://news.sketchucation.com/category/tutorials / YouTube is also good:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NREaJLMpaI
This guy wrote the For Dummies book, and it's probably the cleanest way into SketchUp: http://www.aidanchopra.com/web-content
R
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2) Any words of wisdom to become sketchup semi-proficient within a few days?
There are a number of tutorials online that will help you avoid the more common pitfalls. Rule one is to start making groups out of things right from the get go so they won't glue to other drawn elements. When things that should be independent glue together it makes editing them a bitch.
Actually I think you meant to say rule number one is to start making "components" out of everything. With components you can modify one and all copies, unless made unique, will share that modification.
This is Google's intro to SketchUp tutorial. It's nice to be able to use the application to learn the application. http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/details?mid  0309dbdab49ffb545172f70efed474
But there are other video tutorials besides Google's: http://news.sketchucation.com/category/tutorials / YouTube is also good:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NREaJLMpaI
This guy wrote the For Dummies book, and it's probably the cleanest way into SketchUp: http://www.aidanchopra.com/web-content
R
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"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote in message

There used to be excellent Sketchup video tutorials, but it is some years since I stopped using the program so I might be way out of date.
Tim W
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On Tue, 8 Mar 2011 15:01:12 -0500, "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote:

Go to YouTube and watch all the beginner's tutorials. It'll bring you and the tutee up to speed in a hurry. http://tinyurl.com/6hya2mq
More:

http://www.youtube.com/user/SketchUpVideo
http://sketchup.google.com/intl/en/training/videos.html http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/cldetails?mid6e1fa0d054a15eecc725c514c21d975
-- Life is full of obstacle illusions. -- Grant Frazier
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Lee Michaels wrote:

If you are just starting, multiply the amount of time you think it will take by 2.5, at least. Good luck!
Bill

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"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote in

Everything a woodworker should know about SketchUp can be found at http://www.srww.com/google-sketchup.htm . There are many other sides to SketchUp that aren't addressed in his tutorials but if you sit down and follow thru the "Beginner Sketchup Tutorial" you can probably get up to speed in a single day.
Larry
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I don't use the parts libraries but there is some online 3d warehouse thing.
Someone else mentioned groups but I think the most important thing to learn at first besides drawing technique is to use components. Make everything a component. Like as soon as you create a shape and do the first extrude, then highlight the whole thing and right click to Make Component and name it.
Eventually make new components out of groups of components (ie like a face frame all as one unit after it is made out of separate sticks).
Then use the Outliner to manage your components to turn them off, etc.
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On 3/8/2011 2:01 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

Lee,
Simply go to 3dWarehouse and type in "radio" or "antique radio" thusly:
http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/search?q=antique+radio&styp=m&btnG=Search
You should find plenty of models and collections.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
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