Sharpening stones

I want to get a sharpening stone to bring the edge back on my carbide tipped turning tools. But I would like to be able to use it for other sharpening tasks as well, like chisels and planes and knives. I don't want to go broke here.
Anyway it seems I probably need 2, a course and a fine. I was hoping to find somebody who made a dual sided block, but I guess not. Who would you all recommend that is the best bang for the buck?
-Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 31 Oct 2011 08:35:30 -0700, jtpr wrote:

Hoo boy, did you open a can of worms. There's oil stones, water stones , ceramic stones, diamond stones, ad infinitum. At least the oil stones and water stones come in man made and natural. And then there's ScarySharp, narrow belt sanders, ...
But I don't know why you're having trouble finding a coarse/fine combination:
(Amazon.com product link shortened) />/ B0001MSA5Y
or
(Amazon.com product link shortened) />/ ref=sr_1_13?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid20078245&sr=1-13
If you'd rather not buy online, I know Woodcraft carries combination stones and I suspect the borgs do as well.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ScarySharp is the same as carborundum, but cheaper, and stays flat. For carbide tipped tools, I'd bite the bullet and spend some bucks for a diamond plate. 600 grit cuts fast and leaves a decent edge.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 31 Oct 2011 08:35:30 -0700, jtpr wrote:

Oops! I read too fast. I use a little diamond hone for those little carbide screw on tips. The only other thing I use it for is carbide router bits.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DMT makes a line called "mini hones" that are high grade industrial diamond strips mounted on a small piece of plastic. They are great, and about $6 - $8 a piece if you buy a set. They are great for touching up router bits a couple of times.
I also used mine a lot when I was turning more to cut a fresh edge on my lathe tools. I don't have carbide faced tools, but have a few harder powdered steels steels like 2030 (much the equivalent of the old SV60) and several in an ultra hard M2. I bought mine in a three tool set for less than $20, and that has been all I have ever needed.
When I made of couple of hollowers, I used M2 laced with cobalt instead of carbide. M2/cobalt is easier to sharpen (easy on a soft, frangible wheel) and more readily available.
You will be surprised all the uses you will find for that little sharpening set. I bought mine at Woodcraft, but they have them all over the place.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Is this the one you refer to? I thought these might be good for the carbide tips. Plus, I could do up to a 1" chisel.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)20093725&sr=1-16
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Jim, I got this set for the truck: http://goo.gl/paUU3 to hone in the field. They're abot the same size as the set you listed but with a continuous diamond surface.
In the shop, I have EZElap 600 and DMT 600 honing plates, both 2x6". http://goo.gl/nelSa I can sharpen wider-than-2" blades on them. I recommend the 6" size or larger. They last forever and are less expensive and _considerably_ less hassle than truckloads of waterstones. Add some higher grit wet-or-dry paper and a strop for finishing. I like Lee Valley's green crayons for the strop. http://goo.gl/H5Zon Hayseuss Farkin' Crisco, lookee de price! <thud> Well, it's a lifetime worth of stick. Diamonds are a sharpener's best friend. Just do it.
1- Grinder, 1" belt sander w/ 120 grit Zirconia belt, or sanding paddle wheel on angle grinder will take care of jagged ends.
2- DMT (my preferred mfgr) 600 grit plate to shape and sharpen.
3- Finer papers on a flat surface (mdf, surface plate, countertop) for finer sharpening.
4- Strop and compound for polishing.
This will net you an inexpensive but very good system of sharpening for all your edges, from pocket knife to kitchen to shop to yard. Whoooooe! I gare-on-TEE it!
-- Inside every older person is a younger person wondering WTF happened.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No. See LJ's post and link (at this time, post #8) to see the exact item I referred to. I like those a lot, and if you are a good freehand sharpener they are great.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I use something like this for touching up carbide, I like having the handle but it may make no real difference:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)20334628&sr=1-1
When I sharpen my chisels I want a lot more room to work with. I want my chisels to be much sharper than I can get from a DMT diamond stone, and for that I need to be able to flatten the back and have it honed to a very fine surface (mirror polish) and then grind the bevel and sharpen the very edge of the bevel to a similarly fine level.
An inexpensive way to get started in that is to use the "scary sharp" system, which uses sandpaper or similar abrasives, with sheet of flat glass and a honing guide. But over the long haul I have switched to a grinder and waterstones because sandpaper quickly wears out.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 31 Oct 2011 09:48:12 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

That's the ones I've got. They work great.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/31/2011 10:35 AM, jtpr wrote:

turning tools. But I would like to be able to use it for other sharpening tasks as well, like chisels and planes and knives. I don't want to go broke here.

somebody who made a dual sided block, but I guess not. Who would you all recommend that is the best bang for the buck?

I would imagine that carbide cutting tools would eat through a natural stone in moments. I would suggest a diamond sharpening stone.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You will need a diamond stone to effectively sharpen carbide. DMT is a well known good quality brand but for occasional use there are many others available by searching Amazon that are cheaper and even HF has a few that are OK.
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think you're SOL.
Nothing short of diamond is going to work on carbide. A diamond plate or slip will wear out (I guess the diamond get crushed.) so you probably do not want to waste it on anything but carbide.
For steel there are numerous choices. The cheapest is scary sharp (google it) which works as well as anything else. The most compact setup that works fast and produces as fine an edge as scary sharp would probably be a couple or three waterstones.
Other stones work too, depending on just how keen you want the edge.
--
FF


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For about 15 bucks you can buy a set of EZ Lap brand diamond sharpeners in a pouch like a pocket protector called an L-PAK, plastic handles diamond surface of about 5/8 x 1.5 ". 3 pieces 1200,600,400 grit .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's the ticket! Excellent for router bits.
--
FF

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.