Shaker and Mission?

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What are the main differences between these styles of furniture?
Thanks.
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Stoutman wrote:

See:
Mission Furniture:
http://www.gustavstickley.com/missionstylefurniture.html
Shaker Furniture:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shaker_furniture
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Not our Stoutman, it seems. Hmmmm. Tom no(SPAM)vasys wrote:

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I could be wrong, though. Tom tom wrote:

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It's me.
Looking at two pieces of furniture, one Shaker and one Mission, what would distinguish them?
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Stoutman
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Please describe them to me. Tom Stoutman wrote:

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Please see original post.
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Stoutman
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I'm sorry. I thought you were_ looking_ at them, not just figuratively. They look pretty similar, don't they? Seems to me the Shaker style is a little more lithe in the leg. More carved tapers, spindles, etc. Mission: a little more stout, overall, with wider, more squared components. Of course, less embellishment in the Shaker would be expected, but how can you get less embellished (well, within reason) than Mission? The Mission might sport some bevelled through tenons, dutchmen and such, I guess. Stoutman wrote:

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While having a similar discussion with a guy who made a Bombay Chest out of solid mahogany he cynically summed up Mission as follows: "You can shape all the pieces with your planner." As Tom points out there are simple curves and turnings associated with Shaker.
John
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"John Grossbohlin" wrote in message

of
... and that, apparently, was considered one of the pluses of it's near kin/predecessor, Arts and Crafts:
"Frank Lloyd Wright's lecture, "The Art and Craft of the Machine," delivered at the Chicago Society of Arts and Crafts in 1901, in which, after invoking the name of William Morris, he went on to declare: "The machine, by its wonderful cutting, shaping, smoothing, and repetitive capacity, has made it possible to so use it without waste that the poor as well as the rich may enjoy today beautiful surface treatments of clean, strong forms""
The essence of A&C, "Mission" being a close cousin of sorts, was to use the "machine" to relieve the tedium of repetitive, manual tasks which the artisans of prior ages were slave to.
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Interesting quote from Wright. Though I never thought of Wright as trying to go mass market he clearly understood what the technology could do. I'd think today's wonder machine, i.e., the one that brings variety to the masses, would be the CNC machines. With CNC the masses can afford fancy looking stuff like Chippendale, Queen Anne, etc...
John
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1901 is pretty early for Wright, before the Larkin Building and Unity Temple. He was just developing the Prairie Style and mainly building private homes.
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Andrew Williams wrote:

However he was always looking for a way to go mass market--that was the main point of his "Usonian Automatic" designs in the '50s, something that could be built with little skilled labor--people have built them by starting out with a mold and making one concrete block at a time until they had enough to build the house.
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On Sun, 23 Jul 2006 21:09:27 -0400, Andrew Williams

It's not early for Wright, it's just early for Wright's Prairie period. He had a _long_ career, and the early stuff alone would be enough for most architects.
Have you ever visited his house, if you're in Chicago? That's a fine example of his early period styles.
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I think the best way to see the difference is to go to Google images and do searches such as "mission style chair" and "shaker chair" and compare what you see. The differences will become pretty apparent pretty quickly.
Mark
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Shaker is hand work trying to look like machine work, Craftsman is machine-made trying to look like hand work.
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wrote:

I thought the Shakers did not eschew the use of machinery; they did shun ostentation in their products. That's why you see wood knobs, lack of carvings, etc.
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On Mon, 24 Jul 2006 20:04:11 -0700, Mark & Juanita

Shakers certainly weren't anti-machinery, it's just that not much of it had been invented by then. Even Babbitt's famous circular saw was still only seen as a labour-saver for construction carpentry timber, not a resaw for cabinetry.
The Shakers used hand tools (with great skill) and they aspired to the sort of perfection of finish that we usually identify as "machine-made quality" -- certainly in the early Victorian period when "machine made" was an accolade found proudly stamped onto goods.
The Arts and Crafts movement is a late Victorian reaction, primarily to the dehumanising effects of factory life on the workers. Ruskin and Morris saw it less in terms of products and more in terms of those involved. The later American A&C theorists attempted to recapture the golden age of craft labour by the deliberate application of machines. If you could make an honest product, then the assumption was that it would generate honest employment and fair treatment of workers. At the same time, the product was supposed to look as if it were hand-made and to avoid all the gingerbread that Victorian machinery had been so good at churning out.
The English A&C movement never took this line, even in the 20th century (pre-war anyway). Gimson and the Barnsleys were adamant over the use of hand tools, and the way that artisan craftsmanship was the only right way for an artisan craftsman to be employed.
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"Andy Dingley" wrote in message

<snipped only for brevity>
Very well stated in its entirety.
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It's difficult to pinpoint the main differences because these styles evolved over time and differed between villages. There are probably more similarities than differences between these two styles.
Shaker lighter, fewer members religious belief influenced design furniture pieces used for tasks and work milk paints & hand-rubbed finishes
Mission stronger pieces often heavier somewhat crude design
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