Setting a wagon tire

Page 4 of 6  


Well, you could get a big tank of propane and/or other gas and just heat up the whole thing. I would think tha it would take a fair amount of gas and time.
As for a charcol pit, that would probsbly work. How about just making a circular pit? Dig a hole in the ground a bit bigger than the wheel, but leave the middle intact. So you are just heating the steel itself and not a big unrelated area.
This seems like a whole lot of work and bother for a little authenticity. Is it really worth all this trouble?
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Use the tire as the fire ring.... Once it is hot enough, install.
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On 7/31/2010 1:58 PM, Cross-Slide wrote:

There's a notion, but will that get it properly red hot?
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wrote:

Sure, use a little LOX.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TBLr_XrooLs

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On 7/31/2010 1:10 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

It's about the journey, not the destination. I'd like to do it just so I know I can.
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J. Clarke wrote:

Get your weed killer big as you can afford. use bricks to make 2 walls 2in apart by 2ft long by 2 ft tall. blockoff one end and the top all bar say a 2in part. put your iron wheel inside between the 2 walls. In the opposite bottom corner leave a 2in gap. Light your propane burner apply flame to bottom hole. Heat steadily for probably 30 mins till the whole of the inside is red hot inc the iron wheel. Have your wooden wheel supported flat on some bricks and your tongs at the ready. Take out the redhot iron place on the wheel and hammer down. Pour lots of cold water on it ant it will shrink up well.all youll get is lot of steam. hope this helps. Ted Dorset in UK.
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There's no need to dig a pit. Just set the rim on the ground and raise it up about an inch or two with rocks or anything that won't burn. Cover the entire rim with charcoal and light it. There's no need for charcoal in the center of the circle. It shouldn't burn with any more smoke than a bbq. Raising the rim gives room for air to get to the charcoal under it and will heat it better. Underhill, the Woodwright, did a show years back on this very subject. The actual fitting required some fine adjustments with a sledgehammer, and be sure to have plenty of buckets of water handy for when the fitting is done. Art
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On 7/31/2010 4:09 PM, Artemus wrote:

It's a no burn ordinance, not a no smoke ordinance. It's the fire not in a fireproof container that's the issue, not the smoke.

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wrote:

A ring of firebrick laying on the ground is by definition a fireproof container. That's what firebrick is made for. So would a sheet of steel qualify.
I would get a copy of the actual ordinance and see what it *really* requires.
Joe Gwinn
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On 7/31/2010 6:00 PM, Joseph Gwinn wrote:

And that is more effort than I want to go through for this project. This is supposed to be recreation.
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J. Clarke wrote:

You should talk to one of the local Amish smiths. In this area they are using a neat wheel. They look like the standard wood/steel construction. BUT they actually have a wood center/spokes/rim, Then they have a layer of rubber glued to that and a steel ring around all of it. The rubber gives a better ride and seems to lower the wear on the steel as well.
--
Steve W.

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Sounds a bit fancy and prideful to me...
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ATP wrote:

Why? It sounds like less labor, for a longer useful life.
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I'm kidding, but the Amish have an unusual take on things. I guess rubber under the steel is OK, but rubber tires would be unholy. But whatever they're doing seems to be working for them. I wonder if they're still busy making those stoves...
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On 8/4/2010 4:44 PM, ATP wrote:

It's not that rubber tires are "unholy"--their rule is no powered vehicles that can be driven on the highway and no rubber tires is a way to enforce it.
Much of the Amish attitude toward technology is pragmatic--it's not that it's "unholy", it's that they want to maintain a particular social structure of their community and they're perfectly happy to go with technologies that don't upset that social structure but they after due consideration forbid those that do upset it.

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I'm not sure I follow - I've seen Amish wagons on the road, both with rubber wheels and without. What does that have to do with it being powered? None of the Amish wagons are powered.

Different sects of the Amish have different takes on the rubber. Some allow it, some don't. Least that's what I've read. And it's owning things that creates the problem. The Amish can take public transportation and they'll hire buses when necessary.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

If you saw a buggy with rubber wheels it was NOT Amish. More likely Mennonite.
Basically there are different orders of plain folks. Old order Amish - These are the ones who shun pretty much all modern technology, no powered machinery on the farm and maybe a phone stuck on a pole out in the middle of a field for all the "local" Amish to use.
New order Amish - These allow some modern technology like generators and solar power as well as some powered machinery on the farm with maybe a steel wheeled tractor or crawler allowed. They allow a phone in the barn or greenhouse and some even have a drivers license even though they are not supposed to drive cars.
Mennonite - The closest to what we take for normal people. They allow tractors and rubber tires on the buggies, some even have cars. They do some stuff the old ways but also have cell phones and electricity in some places.

Yep, and they also hire out locals to take good to market sales and such. One of the locals has me drive him or his wife around quite a bit to different farmers markets. VERY nice folks. The neighbors are currently selling out their farm and I'm hoping that some friends of the Amish I know buy it.
--
Steve W.

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I hang out on newsgroups - maybe too much - and I don't know if I know what a 'normal' person is anymore!

I hope the Amish buy this place: http://newsfeed.time.com/2010/08/02/n-h-farm-on-sale-after-378-years-in-the-family /
I'd hate to be the one to make the decision to sell such a place.
R
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wrote:

Best auto mechanic I ever knew was Mennonite!
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