Sensitized to formaldehyde/need workbench

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I'm being pedantic, I know, ..... however,
Casting resin (white polymer) is even cheaper - $79 for 2 gal - which equates to $39.50/gal
From their site:
AeroMarine Casting Resin is a thin, fast setting polymer used for casting parts for many applications. It features a simple “one to one” mix ratio. It contains no fillers, has no odor, and cures to an off-white color. Colorants are available, and this product is easily painted.
RED SYSTEM: AeroMarine 300/11 epoxy is a simple, non-critical 1:1 by volume mix. It has a 45 minute work life, 24 hour cure, and is a medium syrup viscosity. Used for bonding, great for concrete repair, and general woodworking applications. It is widely used by people building boats, airplanes, r/c models, etc. ($46/gal)
diggerop
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wrote

Good advice from Steve.
There are two essential rules to consider when applying epoxy; -
Rule 1/. Surface Preparation is Critical Rule 2/. See Rule 1
The following links appear to provide a good starting point on the process.
http://www.epoxyproducts.com/prep.html
http://www.epoxyproducts.com/beginfloor4u.html
http://www.epoxyproducts.com/slab4u.html
diggerop
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wrote

I learned I can rent a Edco concrete floor grinder for $95 for the day + grinding materials (and a hand grinder for $45 more, for the corners). The "diamond" (Dyma-Sert) cutters are $150 to rent and the stone ones ("coarse" is appropriate for epoxy preparation according to what I have read about the stones online) are about $50 to buy. The person doing the renting could only tell me that most people don't get the diamond ones. My 2 car garage is exactly 500 sqare feet.
Can I go right at my 40 year old badly stained floor (which has 2 long narrow cracks, with shifting about them) without power washing first? Nothing is wet, it's just aged grime (and I want to smooth the cracks). An Edco video I saw mentioned that the stones can get plugged with glue, but that doesn't seem too likely to me from a lot of very old grime and a bit of paint. However, I would hate to see "smearing" occur because that most likely wouldn't provide good preparation for the epoxy... Feedback invited, of course.
Bill
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Wood being unstable, I'm thinking that that these pieces may not lie together as nicely as one would like. I was thinking of using 6 pipe clamps for this (and all) of the glueing. It seems like one could take advantage of the "factory edge down" guidance to assist here. Especially since, by the time everything is glued together, the errors could be added together 8 times. Is the plan to just sand away all uneven-ness with the commercial drum sander later? I've got a 9" and 14" planes now and a 12.5" bench planer. I could put the glued 8" wide by 73" pieces through my bench planer and glue them after that--maybe there is no significant advantage though, huh, since the 8" wide by 73" pieces probably each have their own character (deviations from true-ness). I'd like to think I might finish the jobs with the hand planes, but I'll see what you folks think first. I hope to complete 2 benches along with a shelf or two for them.
By the way, I saw that Lowes has 3/4" pipe clamps for just over $15--best price I've seen.

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"Bill" wrote:

One of the reasons you only glue one joint at a time.

You are goinjg to want to alternate clamps (One up, one down) to keep things in line.
Plan on a dozen clamps.

Not if you follow my glue-up schedule I gave you.

Yep.
Don't send a boy to do a man's job.
You will end up fiddle f**king with those hand tools forever and probably still won't be happy.
$30 spent for drum sander time is the best $30 you will spend on this project.
Have fun.
Lew
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Lew, Thank you for answering my questions!
Anyone, Please let me know if you would suggest a book or two that I might find useful. I've begun reading Scott Landis', "The Workbench Book", but I would also be interested in a good one that describes fundamental techniques (such as clamping). It's easy to see, in retrospect, why alternating clamps may be helpful here, but I don't think I would have considered alternating them unless my dry glue-up failed. I've read some, but I realize I have a great deal to learn... I think the fun is in the journey.
Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

Fred Bingham's book, "Boat Joinery and Cabinetmaking Simplified" covers the basics and will cause you to ask more questions.
Forget the boat stuff unless it interests you.
About $20 from Amazon.
Lew
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I just requested it from my library. Part of my intent was to not have to ask so many questions to the group. I expect that after I look at the book, any questions that I have will be better ones.
I hope for an early 2010 assembly. I've got a co-project of patching, painting and cleaning my garage/"workshop to be" with a concrete grinder--never used one of those before, but they evidently rent them in town at $95/day! :) Based on your last message, I need to plan on buying a few more pipe clamps too (12)...
Thank you! Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

It's a great book and very informative in a down to earth way.

Better than what?
You have had some very good questions.

Sounds like a total PITA project.

A suggested new project, a 4x8 general purpose table which I found to be absolutely indispensable,
Start by building a 4x8 frame with doubled (sistered) 2x6 and 2x6 interior studs on 24" centers.
(Basically looks like stud wall when complete)
Cut 4, 2x6x32" pieces for legs.
Cut gusset plates about 18"x24" from 1/2 CDX ply. (8 Req'd)
You want these to be triangular in shape along one edge so if you are careful with your layout, you will save a little ply.
These ply gussets get sandwiched between the 2x6 legs and 2x6 table top(stud wall).
As Norm would say, "Time for a little assembly".
Attach gusset plates to stud wall with glue and deck screws, then attach legs to gusset plates with more glue and deck screws.
Use some 1x4 for diagonal braces to keep legs in place.
Next cover table top with doubled 4x8x1/2 ply.
(I used 1/2" CDX.)
Plug any voids in surface ply with filler, sand smooth, then paint.
I used one of these for 10 years. Kept it outside and covered with a silver tarp.
Wouldn't have been able to work without it.
(Your Planer fits very well when you want to use it, at least mine did)
Have fun.
Lew
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Remember where this thread started...I've not had luck being around fresh plywood at all. I do need to draw up a design for my bench (es) though.
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"Bill" wrote:

To answer your question, "yes", but I forgot.
Can you paint the stuff or is just being on the same planet with it a problem?
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

He said that he's sensitized--being in the same building with it does a number on him.
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Well, being in the same room where the untreated material has been sitting is a problem. I had to give away a Sauder bookcase I bought because I couldn't stand to be in the same room with it (a lot of sweating--my whole body, especially my chest, arms, neck). That was a stronger reaction than my usual shortness of breath reaction from mere exposure.
When I actually sanded some plywood and laminate (on different days) the reactions were ones I had to face in bed. I've been to the emergency room for similar reactions twice (from other allergens), and knowing there is not much they do, except tell me that the first number of my blood pressure is about 165, I just "road it out". I was worried though.
It's sort of become personal. I don't want to have plywood, MDF or particle board in my life anymore than I have to. I will be very pleased to build and use a formaldehyde-free workbench! With regard to your question, I wish there were no plywood, MDF or particle board, as we presently know them, on this planet! :) For similiar reasons, I also wish there were no chickens in my grocier's freezer with "broth added", or products with artificial smoked flavoring, but I won't hold my breath waiting for any of these things to disappear. Amusingly, if I had been born 50 years earlier I would not have encountered any of these unnatural allergens. ;)
By the way, ICYAI, in the food industry, the advertising word "natural" has absolutely no meaning.
Bill
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------------------------------------------------------ I previously asked:

"Bill" wrote:

Can certainly appreciate your problem as I developed contact dermatitis from exposure to epoxy a few years ago.
It was a bear for awhile.
I understand you can't machine ply, cdx, etc, but what about painted ply surfaces.
That table I described was built outside, lived it's entire life outside with only a couple of coats of paint to protect it.
It could be built without ply gussets but you're stuck with a ply table surface.
Lew
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From what I have read, paint does not prevent outgassing of formaldehyde--but there are sealants that do. I am currently sitting at a Sauder computer desk I assembled in 1997 which gives me no problems now. It did in 1997, but I was less sensitive at that time. I remember looking at some of my furniture then questioning, "How can a piece of furniture seem to make me sweat?".
To me, "time" seems like a better healer of the material than a covering for it is. Personally, I'd like to avoid it altogether. I would like to avoid bringing any new materials into my home that place my sense of well-being at risk. My sense of well-being was bombarded while I was figuring out what my issues were. By the way, I don't think these aren't just my issues--I think I'm just a little more sensitive than most people to the chemicals that are showing up in consumer products and food. I don't think the chemicials under question are good for any people. Sadly, I think that he big picture here is remnicient of the way that tobacco companies defended the safety of smoking cigarettes (until not very long ago). I don't find this encouraging--and it bothers me that the USA allows the import of building materials that no other country will allow?!$$
Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

Once you asre sensitized, you are basically screwed.
Just trying to see if there were any work arounds that produced a result you could live with.
Lew
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I've been thinking about the pipe for the pipe clamps.
I assume that "black steel 3/4, schedule 40" is the right type.
I was thinking 24 to 28 two foot pieces would be about right, so that using couplets, that would allow me to have 12 to 14 four-foot clamps (of course, I've never done this before).
I know someone who can thread the pipe for me if I buy unthreaded pipe--but where? What is a good source for this pipe?
I've been scrounging around the Internet, so I'm not idealess, but I still would like to hear your ideas.
Maybe I should give up all this "nonsense" and try to get the bar clamps on sale at HF for $5 each...
Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

48" pipe is a good length.
These days there are speciality firms that make pipe nipples all day long.
Find a plumbing supply house and get a quote on 3/4" Sch 40, black, 48" Lg, threaded nipples.
Throw in a 3/4" coupling for each nipple and you are good to go.
Have fun.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Home Depot will cut and thread it for you if they don't already have it in stock prethreaded in the length you want.
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Around here, Home Depot has lots of pipe, and in cut lengths of 48".
Tanus
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