Semi OT: Shop Floor - padded floor or good shoes?

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Hi David
Did you get the foam underlay at Rona as well? If so, can you remember the brand name? Our local Rona is a little on the dim side when it comes to anything that is not the norm, so when you ask about underlay for laminate floors all they preent you with is the thin white foam (2mm maybe 3mm at best).
George Montreal
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No, George, I actually got the underlay at End of the Roll (www.endoftheroll.com, two Quebec locations). Much better quality for about the same cost ... I know exactly the stuff Rona's trying to sell you. The stuff I used is very dense, moreso even than a carpet underlay.
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on 3/7/2005 1:47 PM Duane Bozarth said the following:

If I'm not mistaken, all of those laminate floors, Pergo, etc. are meant to be floating. You must maintain a gap between the flooring and walls, cabinets, etc which are then bridged with shoe base and quarter-round. Getting ready to do a kitchen and I'm somewhat concerned as to whether or not to run it in all the way underneath the refrigerator and the stove/oven or just far enough to conceal the rough edge. Probably not a problem and I'm leaning to just installing it all the way beneath the appliances. I can't imagine there being enough seasonal movement with the laminate (will be using Pergo) to be a problem so long as the stuff's not butted up against the cabinet bases and/or wall plates.
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news:Ah5Xd.17495

problem, and I went "wall to wall" with appliances on top ... looks as good today as when I laid it, and as you say, leave a bit of space at the walls that you can cover with trim.
If it can withstand a passel of kids and the stringent and harsh cleaning necessities that entails as well as rolling appliances across it regularly (fridge out for cleaning, portable dishwasher as the kitchen reno featuring a built in is at least a year away ... ), you should be ok.
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on 3/7/2005 5:37 PM David D said the following:

Thanks, I figured I'd have more problems with moving the appliances in and out with that "lip" even if I trimmed it out with their transition piece or made my own.
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Redwing shoes are tops in my book. have a knee problem also. BUT a soft floor is real easy on dropped tools.
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If one has a good farm supply, one can usually find livestock floor pads at much less than equivalent shop padding costs. A few of those in judicious locations can make a big difference.
I'm in the same boat wrt to knees/back, etc., so it makes a big difference on both fronts--cushioning and not so blamed cold (directly on the feets, anyway)...
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Like any flooring, most if it goes unnoticed and or unused. Why have expensive flooring under and behind heavy equipment. I suggest Rockport hiking shoes. That is what I use and have spent years working on concrete and nothing gets tired or sore anymore because of the floor. Alternatively you can put down good quality anti-fatigue mats in areas that you do a lot of standing. These can be easily moved when you rearrange the shop again. :~)
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My suggestion is good shoes and anti-fatigue mats as well. I bought my mats from Costco and they are quite economical. All my mats are 36"x36" and I have them running in front of all my tools in a continuous run. All in I probably have about 25 mats. At a cost of about $15 per mat, it's not hard on the wallet. As well, if you intend to use your shop for it's original purpose at all, like for cars, then these mats are very convenient.
Neil
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well there might be a question of quality... but we just picked up a pack of mats at sam's club for ~15. they are two sided, black on one, colored on the other and interlock like a puzzle. It was sold as a "multi purpose mat" IIRC. (showed kids on the colorful side and a guy working on the black side.)
Each unit mat is ~2x2 and there were 8 total... so ~$2 a mat, or $0.50/ft^2 after taxes.
We picked it up for the wife's DDR (dance dance revolution) floor-mat which doesn't have any padding of it's own, but now that i think about it, i might pick up a couple packs for the shop. ;)
--
be safe.
flip
Ich habe keine Ahnung was das bedeutet, oder vielleicht doch?
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Even if you buy the shoes, spring for an area mat (2'x4') for when you will be standing in one spot for a while. That's fairly cheap and will give you a significant benefit.
-Steve
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I find that there are about four spots in my shop where I stand at least 80% of the time. (in front of the bench, in front of the lathe, in front of the table saw, and behind the table saw (I use the outfeed table as an assembly and finishing area)). A good quality anti-fatigue mat big enough to catch most dropped tools (about 3ft x 5ft) in each of these spots solved my concrete floor pains with minimal investment. I can drag one where I need it as projects demand, as well. I got the "super-soft corrugated top 5/8" thick sponge vinyl" mats from McMaster and they have held up for 10 years of use so far. You can order any size by the foot from them.
Roger
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There was a review of various mats etc... in a recent Fine Woodworking IIRC. I do remember that it was pretty pricey for even a small shop. I'm really liking the laminated floor idea. Not to mention the Jones' factor. Can you imagine telling your neighbor that you put down the same laminate they used in their house, in your garage (in my case unfortunately)? Good shoes are really a neccesity in my book whether cushioned floor or not. Cheers, cc
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Even at a buck a square foot laminate flooring is not inexpensive. Do the math, a 20 foot x 20 foot room will run $400. 5-6 fatigue at mats at work areas will run much less than that. Then if your shop is also a garage the flooring is pretty much out of the question.
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solutions. I have tried those 1/2" or so mats from the likes of Sam's Club etc... and actually found them to be a bit too cushiony for my tastes and I couldn't get good leverage on them for tasks like hand planing etc... Looking at the mats that FWW reviewed, prices ranged from $1.10/SF to $4.29/SF so comparing to these alternatives, the laminate would be cheaper. I haven't priced out those horse mat type things but I do remember my local Woodcraft had them on sale a while back and the cost to do a portion of the garage was better than $200 (price to do the laminate). I figure 1/2 the garage is just woodworking and there are no vehicles there (well a Harley but that's ok) so no worries about putting a car on it.
Ultimately, if I could afford it, I'd have a dedicated shop and build a raised floor with planks but that's the "dream" so to speak....
Cheers, cc
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James \"Cubby\" Culbertson wrote: ...

The local farmers' supply has 4x6 (perforated or solid, your choice) at $28/ea, w/ volume discount as much as 25% depending on number. I like the holes for the shop as it lets chips, etc., fall in. Only disadvantage is they're fairly heavy so if join a bunch together it's somewhat of a pita to clean up completely. I keep most separate so simply lay one at a time back and sweep up (on the rare occasion I get that anal about it)...OTOH, a hose w/ floor sweep attachment on the DC makes pretty quick work of the bulk of it so there's not a real need unless one is fanatical. If the shop were in the house/basement sort of thing it might be a different story...
Anyway, they're relatively cheap, almost indestructable, heavy enough to not move, have good traction and yet "cushiony-enough" to make a really noticeable difference plus help a lot on the cold-feeling slab in an unheated area.
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On Tue, 08 Mar 2005 10:44:47 -0600, Duane Bozarth wrote:

I figgered that was a disadvantage; too hard to sweep up. Ok, I guess, if you use a shop vac. How are they (the stock mats) for resilience?
--
"Keep your ass behind you"
vladimir a t mad scientist com
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Australopithecus scobis wrote:

It's a mixed blessing...overall, I like the hole so I don't step on small cutoffs, etc., that gives an uneven footing and will put up w/ the cleanup hassle for that. They can be had in either form, however.
For resilience, I'm not sure which specific issue you're wanting to know about...they're dense but flexible and have sufficient cushion to relieve the foot-weariness yet don't feel spongy as some of the lighter ones do. They are a really tough for withstanding cuts, etc., as they will stand up to cattle/horse traffic for quite some time.
HTH...
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Rockler and Woodcraft sell some pretty nice anti-fatigue mats in various sizes. It's certainly less expensive to put several small mats where they're needed, than to try to cover the entire floor. I have four mats in two different sizes. One large one stays next to the workbench most of the time, one large one stays in front of the table saw most of the time, one small one gets kicked around to wherever it's needed, and one small one *never* moves from in front of the lathe.
Good shoes with arch supports are a must, even with the mats. Rockport makes several that are suitable. I've also found combat boots to be surprisingly comfortable. Your foot comfort will also be considerably enhanced with good heavy socks made of natural materials; I'm partial to wool myself, but cotton works well too. The synthetics just don't allow your skin to breathe.
We've kicked this topic around a few times before, too. A Google search on this newsgroup will turn up hundreds of opinions.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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Actually, Doug, as ex military myself, and as I mentioned, my partner runs a daycare and one of our families is current military, good, properly broken in combat boots make excellent and extremely comfortable and safe shop footwear. Our daycare dad has arthritis, and the Canadian military provides him with custom boots from a company called BioPed ... my slippers should be so comfortable and supportive.
I also agree about the natural fiber socks, although I prefer cotton to wool ... or silk to wool. Wool is too hot for my taste.
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