Sears CabinetTable Saw

Page 1 of 2  
This may have been asked already, but has anyone got the Sears Cabinet saw, they are selling in their stores now. Looks pretty good, just wondering how it compares to other cabinet saws. Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It is not a cabinet saw. It has some cabinet saw features, but it's not in a class with the Unisaw, nor is it intended to be. For more information, do a search on here on "hybrid" saws.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Charlie Self wrote:

Soooooooooooooooooooooo, what exactly defines a cabinet saw?
UA100
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
UA100 asks:
Charlie Self wrote:

Soooooooooooooooooooooo, what exactly defines a cabinet saw?
UA100
Multiple belts, more power primarily, but the real definition of any saw is in the mind of the manufacturer. This Orion product is classed as a hybrid, as is one Jet and the originator of the class, the larger DeWalt table saw. I understand General also produces a hybrid.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I thought a cabinet saw is defined by having the trunnion attached the cabinet instead of to the top?
Brian Elfert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You mean that Craftsman #OR35505 for $649? ...of course you do, it's the cheaper one with cast iron table and wings and that seems nice for the money. I don't own a TS but I use three different ones. I think this one is a fine deal, but I also know that the motor is only 1-1/2 horse power, I think that is not enough power to effectively rip 8/4 maple stock because in doing such, I had to use a 3hp cab saw to do it in adult ed. and I had to send the blade upwards three times even with that, to make one cut, a Chinese 12" saw that was a donation to the shop. With the Sears saw you might up the blade 4-5 times for one cut.
Recently I did it again on an old Oliver 270D 14" blade, I believe it is five full hp and it was one cut easy without upping the blade three times... it was like 4/4 oak on an old 1hp Delta Unisaw, maple is a hot slow bitch though bro... just some perspective for you.
--
Alex
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
AAvK notes: "TS but I use three different ones. I think this one is a fine deal, but I also know that the motor is only 1-1/2 horse power, I think that is not enough power to effectively rip 8/4 maple stock because in doing such, I had to use a 3hp cab saw to do it in adult ed. and I had to send the blade upwards three times even with that, to make one cut, a Chinese 12" saw that was a donation to the shop. With the Sears saw you might up the blade 4-5 times for one cut."
Up the blade? Why would you raise the blade? If you have a good blade, and feed properly, almost any decently made 1-1/2 HP saw will cut 8/4 hard maple. It won't do it all day, every day, but if you're having feed problems that cause you to raise the blade, I'd suggest--strongly--that you check the blade for sharpness.
I've got one of the 1-3/4 HP Sears hybrid saws, and while I've not cut any maple with it, I have cut some 12/4 cherry, a wood that burns just as easily. No problem at all using the original blade and making the cuts in a 9' long section. It does take care in feeding, but that's the operator, not the saw.
If you had trouble cutting 8/4 maple with a 3 HP saw, I'd really suggest you toss the blade and get a better one.
Another point: now often do any of us rip 8/4 maple or oak? And how much do we rip when we do it? Is it worth spending the extra hundreds of dollars to outfit ourselves to handle a very occasional need that can usually be dealt with simply by using the sharpest blade on hand and slowing the feed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I tried it. Didn't work, as it was far too slow and HOT! The Oliver 270D carried not one single problem doing it.
I watched the blade being put onto the Chinese saw 12" as it was mentioned to be newly sharpened. When I finally got to use it for the maple it was about 1-1/2 months or more after that. The blade does need a stabilizer though, I can tell when it slows to a stop, it's got some slight wobble. These folks sharpened it, they are in my town: http://www.carbide.com/ they have three of my handsaws as of yesterday.

That is a good example being 12/4 cherry, it's still not what maple is though... in fact the only close factor is that they are both "wood".

It takes a loooooong time to get the ol' fella to get anything needed done though. He is about 85.

the aspects... being my real point. I add it up to being able to build nominal house furniture using a table saw, as should any woodworker. I don't think too many people can say "I'll only build little boxes and small pieces". I can see a 1-1/2 HP contractor saw as being for framing building using doug fir. Not for serious work in a shop using hardwoods. Give me 3hp/12" at the very least. Not that I am an expert.
There is one fellow in adult ed. class who arrived with an 8/4 white oak board and is cutting it up and building a bed frame with it but using the oliver, so, often enough bro... and I definitely slowed the feed next to a very hard to use fence. Equipement-wise, it could be a far better situatuation if he kept up. It has taken about eight months since he first promised to put sharp blades on the 12" jointer. Looks like it might be coming up soon. Sorry to sound so "mechanical" in the way I express myself but I do have three different chemical imbalances upstairs here...
Are you happy with your table saw (I do know which one it is)?
--
Alex
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's kind of a hard argument to pass off on people who have used 1 1/2 - 2HP table saws for years and have indeed cut the very woods you mention. Of course, we are all entitled to our own opinions and I certainly have nothing against a saw that is bigger then mine, and I can recognize certain benefits to a bigger saw, but... those benefits do not - time and woodworking have proven - do not support your claim above.

Alex - from everything you've said about your adult.ed environment, it is about the most ill equipped I've heard of. You are making judgments on classes of machinery based on experiences with very poorly maintained tools, improperly set up tools, and in general, an environment that probably 80% of the folks here would not consider acceptable in their home shops. The good news - there's a whole bunch of good news awaiting you. The first time you use a well set up 1 1/2HP saw, you'll be thrilled at what you "discovered".
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a Sears 1-1/2 HP table saw, and I have done a fair amount of ripping of 8/4 maple, as well as rosewood, purpleheart, walnut, and koa as thick or thicker, in a single pass. You've just got to take it slow, and a sharp blade really helps.
BTW, you need a ripping blade for this application. Those 60 and 80-tooth blades make a nice clean cut, but they generate more heat too.
--Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Okay okay okay you guys... then that Chinese saw needs one serious tuning- up all around. It'll never get done and I know it. Thanks for clearing things up. Sheesh! But, now I know for the future, if I get to the point where I can have my own saw.
--
Alex
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Was the blade installed backwards? I had an old 1 1/2hp contractor saw that would slice 8/4 hard maple with little trouble.
See the thread on Forrest.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
TeamCasa Feb 15, 3:34 pm show options
Newsgroups: rec.woodworking
Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2005 15:34:38 -0800 Local: Tues, Feb 15 2005 3:34 pm Subject: Re: Sears CabinetTable Saw Reply | Reply to Author | Forward | Print | Individual Message | Show original | Report Abuse

Was the blade installed backwards? I had an old 1 1/2hp contractor saw that would slice 8/4 hard maple with little trouble.
See the thread on Forrest.
Nah. But it had a visible wobble. I guess wobbles don't matter.
I still don't understand how raising the blade three times let him finish the cut.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Poor man's dado...
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
AAvK wrote:

Table saw power has been adequately covered in this thread, but I wanted to mention that a good partner to a low-power table saw is a band saw. If I have something really thick or tough to rip, I just rip it on my band saw. I can clean it up with my #7 jointer plane. Or, if I just bandsaw about 1/16" proud, I can quickly run it through the table saw to clean up that last 1/16, which will go very quickly with only one side of a kerf for the saw to deal with.
-Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Assuming that you are talking about the 22124 it's currently the flavor of the month on the WoodNet forum. You can't swing a dead cat without hitting a discussion of the saw. Luckily when it gets chatted up the original posters have been nice enough to list the number in the subject line making it easy to avoid.
From my brief and accidental readings of the posts there it looks as though most (maybe all) the owners like the saw.
Now I might be cornfused on this next part but apparently the saw is being built for Sears by Orian. Orian is a company made up/founded by some exDeltoids. There's even been a rumor that the Sears saw is identical under the table to the Delta WantsaBeACabinetSaw.
Sears: http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid922124000
Delta: http://www.deltawoodworking.com/index.asp?e 6&pX51
UA100
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There's even

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid922124000
Yeah... and the wantsabe is cheaper: http://www.toolking.com/delta/view.asp?ID 750
--
Alex
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
on 2/15/2005 4:42 PM AAvK said the following:

Yeah, but Tool King doesn't really say that shipping is free, only that expedited ground shipping is NOT available but regular ground shipping, if available, is free. What do you want to bet that ground shipping is UPS and they won't be hustling that 400lb+ saw over to your shop<g>
If I walk into the local Sears hardware store, I'm guessing they'll help load one into my van or truck so no shipping.
Then too, the Sears has a Biesemeyer 30" Commercial Saw Fence, the Delta has, well, a Delta fence as far as I can tell. You can get the Biesenmeyer from Tool King and it's only an extra $350 on sale<g>
Fortunately or unfortunately, I'm not currently in the market. I did see the saw at Sears and it looked pretty nice. Maybe "Crapsman" is trying to make a comeback. Their stationery power tools used to be pretty solid and then became plastic crap, IMO. I'd welcome the return of some solid stuff from them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yeah... but why buy the saw with the long skirt when you can buy the same saw with a mini skirt for $699 and have the guys at Sears load it into your pickup?
http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid922114000&tab=spe#tablink
That model has the cast Iron table/wings, plus 1 HP, and what looks like the B-Fence. Oh yeah... it also has a warranty. Put the extra money into a Forest WWII blade and you're home free.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
captmi asks:
snipped-for-privacy@hotpotato.com Feb 15, 7:48 pm show options
Newsgroups: rec.woodworking From: snipped-for-privacy@hotpotato.com - Find messages by this author Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2005 22:48:06 -0500 Local: Tues, Feb 15 2005 7:48 pm Subject: Re: Sears CabinetTable Saw
Yeah... but why buy the saw with the long skirt when you can buy the same saw with a mini skirt for $699 and have the guys at Sears load it into your pickup?
To start, the Biesemeyer fence. Also, the longer skirt makes for better dust collection, and the motor is ever slightly more powerful, at 1-3/4 HP.
The cheaper saw does NOT have the Biese fence.
The Leitz blade on the top of the line saw approaches the Forrest in cut quality, by the way.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.