Screwdriver bits for brace

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Ah!... I didn't realise that. thanks
Tim W
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Yes -- perhaps an old tool dealer might have some.

I don't know.

If worse comes to worse, You could take an old auger bit, cut off the drill section, and fashion the remaining shank into a screwdriver of the size and shape you need.
Joel Jacobson
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Tim W wrote:

You want the screwdriver bits that have a tapered square shank, designed to be used directly in a bit brace. I've seen them in slotted and Phillips, but never Posidrive. Stanley, Irwin, Millers Falls are typical manufacturers.
That said, though, I couldn't find them in any recent catalogs. They may have been discontinued. Perhaps eBay or one of the antique tool sellers will be your best source.
I'd stay away from the adapters that take the 1/4" hex bits. They are OK for smaller screws, but the hex bits just aren't up to the larger ones. Which are the ones you want the bit brace for.
John Martin
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On Thu, 23 Mar 2006 12:14:10 -0800, John Martin opined:

Tools for Working Wood, http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com : 6, 8, and 10 mm straight, $11.84 - $14.22 Phillips 1/2 and 3/4, $20.16
Part numbers EE-8751.506, .508, .510, .612, .634
--
"Keep your ass behind you"
wreck20051219 at spambob.net
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Lee Valley.

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"Tim W" wrote:
>Reading an old book on boatbuilding, the writer says the _best_ tool for >removing old corroded screws, or any tricky screwing operation is a >screwdriver bit in an old brace (brace & bit cranked hand drill thing). >Sounds like just what I need, but a quick search reveals no source. <snip>
Jamestown Distributors.
If you are going to screw around with a wood boat, J/D will become a MAJOR supplier.
Trust me.
Lew
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Tim W (in vAtUf.23261$ snipped-for-privacy@newsfe2-win.ntli.net) said:
| Reading an old book on boatbuilding, the writer says the _best_ | tool for removing old corroded screws, or any tricky screwing | operation is a screwdriver bit in an old brace (brace & bit cranked | hand drill thing). Sounds like just what I need, but a quick search | reveals no source. Were these items once manufactured? Are they | still available? Posi also? in the uk? with the old square section | tapered shank for locking into the chuck of the brace? Or can the | brace be adapted to take a hexagonal shanked bit?
Tim...
I chucked up a magnetic hex bit holder in an old brace and use inexpensive hex-shanked screwdriver bits. I use mine almost exclusively for square drive wood screws; but would expect that this lash-up would work well for any type of screw.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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On Thu, 23 Mar 2006 09:08:43 GMT, "Tim W"

There's a lot to be said for that - at least for slotted screws. I also still use mine for drilling big holes with spade bits - I like the controllability as it breaks through.

yes, Draper still make them. Maybe Stanley / Record too.
I'd suggest getting an old one though, and certainly avoiding the Draper. If the steel rod of the frame is too thin, then they become springy. If you're putting a lot of force onto the end button to hold it into a screw slot then they bounce up and down uncontrollably.
You also want an old one with a wooden handle, not moulded plastic with a seam line across the middle.
Best of all is perhaps a "joist brace", which has a short body and a single side handle. It's intended for use between floor joists, but it also has less spring to it, a shorter distance between tool and rear pad handle and just as much torque.
The older antique braces had button locking to hold the bits, which is why old bits have a notch filed in their square tapered shank. Later and modern ones have a two jaw tapered chuck. This will _not_ grip a parallel sided drill bit. You also need to get a good screwdriver bit to fit it, and although pozidrive bits do exist, they're hard to find.
You also want a brace with a good quality lockable ratchet. I'd suggest 40-50 year old Stanley kit off eBay.
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