Screw/Nail Into End Grain

On a number of low budget "Home Shows" like "Trading Spaces" the carpenter/woodworker seems to like putting screws or nails into end grain. I always thought that people who don't know what they are doing tackle joinery with that approach.
Can anyone confirm or deny that putting screws/nails into end grain is bad?
Thanks, Hank
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Don't know about nails but srews all the time, Never a problem and the right screw into end grain in very strong Why would it be bad ?????

bad?
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it depends on the application. a fastener in end grail will have less pull out resistance. if the fastener will load in shear it isn't a problem. if the fastener is a screw adequate pull out resistance can often be achieved with a longer screw.     Bridger
On Sun, 11 Jan 2004 18:52:44 GMT, Hank Kingwood

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Well, fastening into endgrain has LESS holding power than any other way of fastening.
Howerver, depending on WHAT the load and stresses are, it may be satisfactory, especially if used with glue
John
On Sun, 11 Jan 2004 18:52:44 GMT, Hank Kingwood

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I am making the Woodsmith cherry bed and they have an excellent solution to end grain joining for the bed rails. about 1/2" from the end of the board you will be screwing into, drill a hole into the wood with a forstner bit to a depth about 1" from the other end of the board. That is, lock the board into a vise and drill through the board parallel to the width. I hope that makes sense. Then glue in a dowel that matches the size of the hole drilled. This provides the extra holding power required because when you drill into the endgrain the screw has some tangential grain to bite into. Used this on a test bed ,made out of pine and works excellent. Details are in the woodsmith issue 108 I believe.
John V

bad?
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Well sure it is weaker than most alternatives but it is quick & easy and often is adequate for a specific purpose. like, say firestops or blocking in walls or floors
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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On Mon, 12 Jan 2004 18:28:14 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net (Lawrence Wasserman) wrote:

stick framing is designed to put nails in end grain under shear loads. what you're not allowed to do in stick framing is use nails in end grain in situations where it will see tension loads. that's where the simpson hardware comes in.
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