Scott's Liquid Gold

I would like any comments on using this product on interior clear redwood paneling.
Will it rejuvenate the old dry wood?
Does anyone know what is in this product?
Thanks.
--
Pacific Pintos

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"Pacific Pintos" wrote:

---------------------------------------------------- I used it to maintain the interior teak on my boat.
Worked well.
I'd try it.
Panelling will suck it up, so be generous when applying.
Have fun.
Lew
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Pacific Pintos wrote:

I do not know what is in it, but my mom used to use this product on her panelling. To rejuvinate old wood I would (and did on a 150yr old spinning wheel) wash it thoroughly with Murphy's Oil Soap and then treat it with Lemon Oil NOT Lemon Polish
https://www.alice.com/buy/1267611-holloway-house-furniture-polish-lemon - oil-wood-conditioner-and-cleaner?p67611&&source=pricegrabber
Is what I used and what I have used in the past with very good results.
Deb
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On Sunday, December 9, 2012 1:35:03 PM UTC-8, Dr. Deb wrote:

Murpheys is OK but for antique furniture all the pros use the same surprising thing. They use goop or any of the no-water hand cleaners as long as they don't have grit (like zep, etc.). Of course you need to be advised even an inappropriate cleaning can ruin the value of a fine antique but if they are grimmey, this stuff is the best. Just an FYI that has very little to do with this post but I am bored and possibly boring also.
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Memories, memories ...
Does anyone besides me remember the Fehrs brewery in Louisville KY? Back in the '50s they had a "light" beer called Fehrs Liquid Gold. I put "light" in quotes because I don't think they called it that - I don't think any brewery was using the term that long ago.
Here's a link:
http://www.beercollections.com/Breweries/Kentucky/Frank_Fehr_Brewing.htm
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"Larry Blanchard" wrote:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------- Missing from the list of Ohio breweries were Erin Brew and Leisey's<S/P> Pilsner Light.
Both were Cleveland breweries producing a product that bordered on something from a discontented horse rather than beer.
Lew
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On Sun, 9 Dec 2012 14:42:32 +0000, Pacific Pintos

My mother used it for furniture when I was a kid. It's like a brown oil.

Somewhat. What is your definition of "rejuvenate"? Is the paneling dirty or clean? If dirty, as Deb said, use Murphy's Oil Soap. It's excellent stuff. Are you after a shiny look or a matte look? For a shine, you might try Waterlox (tung oil finish which builds up to a shine.) Oils will look shiny until they're completely absorbed, then the wall will be matte.

http://www.scottsliquidgold.com/files/msds/MSDS%20SLG%20POUR%20ENGLISH.pdf
It's not much different from Deb's lemon oil, which is essentially mineral oil, beeswax, some cleaner, and a lemon scent. I used to use it on my shellacked knotty pine siding in the old house, but I cleaned first with Murphy's.
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On Dec 9, 9:42am, Pacific Pintos

Mineral oil and naptha. Will need to be renewed frequently.
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Moisturizing dry wood is a fallacy, wood is supposed to be dry, wet or damp wood is unstable and can get moldy. Wood is not skin, it should be dry.
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On Mon, 10 Dec 2012 11:19:25 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

That's easy. As dry as any other stable dried wood in the same vicinity.
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On Mon, 10 Dec 2012 10:57:50 -0500, "EXT"

I suspect the OP was thinking of the effect of oil applied to wood rather than moisture content.
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On Sun, 9 Dec 2012 14:42:32 +0000, Pacific Pintos

Google search: scott's liquid gold msds Result:     Petroleum Process Oil,     CAS Number 64742-56-9,     0.5 mg/cubic meter     (meaning very dilute)
    VM&P Naptha 300 ppm     (meaning not very much of that either)
    The solvent was not identified,     Father Haskell stated it was     mineral oil.
    Also some lemon scent was noted
Search on CAS Number 64742-56-9 returns:
Solvent-Refined Light Paraffinic Distillate
Will it "rejuvenate" old dry wood? No. Will it hurt anthing? No. It will bring out the grain of the wood like any oil finish. Will it cure like Boiled Linseed Oil or Tung Oil? No.
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