Sanding plywood - I'm having a brain cramp!

Hi all:
I'm having a brain cramp, which forces me to post a dumb question. I'm building a wine storage cabinet (it's from the September issue of "Wood"), and most of it is plywood. It tells me to "sand to 220 grit." Great, I can do that...but, what grit do I start with?
If this wasn't plywood I wouldn't worry, but my fear is if I start too low, then sand and sand and sand and sand, then I may go through the veneer...or am I worried about nothing?
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote in

I'd probably start with ~100. It depends on how rough the surface is to start with, I usually use less than 110 grit to knock down things that are too high.
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Puckdropper wrote:

If it has dings and dents in it, like every pice of wood I handle, you can wet those spots and wiat until they are dry before sanding. That will expand them out. Otherwise you may not be able to remove them without sanding through the veneer.
I even dampen scratches on the assumption that there are probably some compressed fibers underneath the torn ones.
--

FF


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If the plywood is reasonably smooth, 220 may be all you'd need. Normally, I'd start with 120 or 180. Yes, that veneer is very thin so take it easy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I agree with Ed. I assume it is hardwood ply? If so, sanding is almost not necessary except for touching up and bringing things together. 220 should be fine

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thats an open ended question.
How thick is the vaneer and how much would do you think you need to remove? Are there scratches? Start with an 80, 150, 220. Heck you can do it all with 220 if you have a few weeks to spare.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HotRod wrote:

It's standard plywood, so whatever the veneer is on it. There aren't any scratches to speak of...the more that I think about this, I probably need to just wet it down and run over it with 80 (or maybe even 150) to knock down the grain, then finish with 220. Only 2 sandings...I like that idea. ;-D
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What kind of plywood? I might hit oak plywood with some 220 and go. Any of the coarse stuff might just scratch the heck out of it.
On 5 Oct 2006 14:10:40 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Double the grit number each time, starting at about 120. Finish beyond 240 though, if it's good quality work.
Start at 40 grit if you're actually removing timber and shaping things.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Go from 120 to 240??????????
Where did you get that idea?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote: : Hi all:
: I'm having a brain cramp, which forces me to post a dumb question. I'm : building a wine storage cabinet (it's from the September issue of : "Wood"), and most of it is plywood. It tells me to "sand to 220 grit." : Great, I can do that...but, what grit do I start with?
What sort of plywood? if this is furniture grade stuff, it's already sanded at the factory to 120 or 150 grit. I'd actually either not sand it at all, or start at 180 or 220, depending on the finish you plan to use.
: If this wasn't plywood I wouldn't worry, but my fear is if I start too : low, then sand and sand and sand and sand, then I may go through the : veneer...or am I worried about nothing?
Nope. Face veneer on plywood is at best 1/42nd of an inch, and some is now 1/100 of an inch. That's about as thick as a sheet of xerox paper.
    -- Andy Barss
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you are using cabinet quality veneer plywood, 150 is plenty coarse enough.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It is absolutely a valid worry. For most of the furniture grade plywood I have used, starting & finishing with 220 has been adequate. The face layer of veneer on most ply is eally thin, I wouldn't want to even get near it with anything coarser than 180.
If you're not sure it's best to sand a scrap and test with the finish you plan to use.
--
No dumb questions, just dumb answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5 Oct 2006 12:02:14 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Experimenting with scraps of the plywood would give you some idea of how much sanding. I would start with 150 grit then 220.
Mark (sixoneeight) = 618
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Scraps? You have scraps? I plan my project to utilize all the wood and buy exactly what I need. Doesn't everyone?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Given that my project are small yep, as a matter of fact I have a load of walnut scraps about the right size for pen blanks. Problem is investing in a pen making setup might be injurious to my health.
Mark (sixoneeight) = 618
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.