Safety issues of wearing gloves when using power tools?

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wrote:

I agree. Plus, working with an alert and clear mind will help question procedures that can be done in a safer manner.
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jtpr wrote:

Kickback happens because fences, blades, and splitters are poorly aligned, along with a board that's able to rotate and catch a rising tooth. "Slippage" has nothing to do with it.
With everything properly aligned, including a splitter, you can actually stop and let go of the work. Nothing will happen if the splitter and/or featherboards keep the work off the rising teeth.
A setup poorly enough aligned will overcome Kung-Fu grip on a saw with enough power. <G>
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For what it's worth: I like to think of myself as a reasonably intelligent person, but one who is deeply inexperienced with power tools. I took wood shop in 1975 and have forgotten most of it, except the part about jointers taking off fingers. (Oh, and that lathes are cool.)
This discussion has been very enlightening to me. Most of it involves tools I don't have yet, or tools that I don't use gloves with anyway, but it has answered some points that I've wondered about in passing. But none of the substance of the discussion was already between my ears when I started working on stuff a year or so ago.
--
Drew Lawson http://www.furrfu.com/ snipped-for-privacy@furrfu.com
"Please understand that we are considerably less interested
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"Drew Lawson" wrote in message

I stand corrected.
Just as with IQ in the general population, it's a good bet that half the woodworker's instinctively know that wearing gloves around woodworking machinery is not a good idea and are in no need of further "documentation".
Making you absolutely correct for the remainder ...
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Maybe it's an age thing...
I'm in my mid-50's. Growing up, I did a bunch of building and construction activities with my dad, some for money, many for charitable activities.
My wife and I raised 4 sons. We did as much as possible with the boys, but not nearly as much as I did with my dad. My sons were deep into sports and other great activities, but the 80's and the 60's were very different decades.
I watch my eldest son in my shop today, and cringe. He's 33, and a really bright fellow, but he's had no shop classes, built very few buildings (or septic tank leach fields), and laid little to no concrete, all staples of my youth.
But they are really good with equipment and systems that didn't really exist in my youth.
And they love the same music I do. ;)
Patriarch
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like cloths....the music comes back in style. R&R will never die. But I dont see (or hope) bell bottom pants come back. Love to see braless halter tops in vogue again.

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Were you not paying attention during the early years of this decade? Bell-bottoms already came back, then went back out.
Oddly enough, I thought they were much more flattering this time around, probably since they were being worn by lovely young women and not, you know, Mom.
- Ken

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I think you are a troll
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Maybe. I'm about to roll to 48, and in shop at school I learned about the risks of loose clothing, jewellery, watches, neckties, gloves, etc in relation to power tools.
Teaching of shop declined seriously in the intervening years, to the point that kids are graduating high school without knowing how to do things I (and you) take for granted.
Most of them can't even make a watering can from a tomato juice can and some sheet metal using snips, a brake, and a REAL soldering iron (the kind that needs a torch).
--
I am extraordinarily patient, provided I get my own way in the end.
- Margaret Thatcher
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On Fri, 20 Apr 2007 19:43:48 -0600, Dave Balderstone
Maybe. I'm about to roll to 48, and in shop at school I learned about the risks of loose clothing, jewellery, watches, neckties, gloves, etc in relation to power tools.
Teaching of shop declined seriously in the intervening years, to the point that kids are graduating high school without knowing how to do things I (and you) take for granted.
Most of them can't even make a watering can from a tomato juice can and some sheet metal using snips, a brake, and a REAL soldering iron (the kind that needs a torch).
--
I am extraordinarily patient, provided I get my own way in the end.
- Margaret Thatcher
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I'm not sure how wearing gloves with power machinery gets crossed up with anything Margaret Thatcher did in Britain, but you can rest assured, this is a trend in the U.S., too, and has absolutely nothing to do with the federal government. Local school districts have been closing down woodworking and metalworking programs at a hot pace for a couple decades now. Very little remains, and this used to be one of the biggest furniture building areas in the world.
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I'm not sure how wearing gloves with power machinery gets crossed up with anything Margaret Thatcher did in Britain, but you can rest assured, this is a trend in the U.S., too, and has absolutely nothing to do with the federal government.
Are you sure? What percentage lawyers, and a current one hoping to crow atop the congressional dungheap with an interesting background. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Edwards#Legal_career
Liability. Of course it would be easier on the poor IA teachers around all that dangerous equipment if they could throw the bums out, instead of giving them continuous attention out of fear they will hurt themselves or others, prompting a lawsuit.
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Oh, for Christ's sake. This is a thread about safety. Save the political bullshit for campaigns.
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Mike wrote:

I'm 31. I didn't take shop in school, so I don't know what they taught...but I assume they still cover this. I did make a bent-shaft paddle in the school shop over noon hours after showing the shop teacher that I knew what I was doing around the tools.

I've never done anything like that but I've done electronics soldering and torch pipe-sweating so I'm fairly sure I could figure it out if I had to.
Chris
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"Patriarch" wrote in message

You bet it is ... leaving me with little patience for coddling the male of the species for any reason. If I'd had any sons, I'd bet that would have wished I'd only had daughters, which I have. ;)

That brought back memories. Raised on a small farm, digging 100' increments of septic tank field lines was one of the punishments for my getting into (frequent) trouble.
The other of Dad's "favorite" punishments, if it didn't warrant the immediate laying on of a leather strap (or perhaps, and depending upon the severity of the offense, in addition thereto), was digging post holes (there were no gas operated post hole diggers in those days!) for so many feet of fence.
This was in addition to feeding and haying twice a day (250 +/- rabbits, a feed lot calf or two, 10 or so horses, the chickens, ducks and geese, and various other critters), keeping two 1/2 acre gardens up to ideal, maintaining the grass and flower beds on the 2 1/2 acres around the house, and the never ending, daily mucking out of stalls ... all being just every day stuff that was expected to "earn your keep".
In this day and age, the kid's themselves would call CPS! ;)
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Use Google--there's a bundle out there. Besides that, most owner's manuals state this in the safety section. If you want more evidence, ask a firend who has worked at a hospital for a few years--lots of stories to tell.
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