Rust spots on new jointer

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I noticed a few very small rust spots on the tables of my jointer today. I was able to remove them with a little scrubbing, but what do you guys do to protect the surface from rust. I have used car wax (turtle wax) on my table saw in the past for this. Anybody advise against using car wax on my jointer/table saw?
Thanks.
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Anything with silicone in it will cause you grief when you want to apply a finish to your project(s).
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sometimes orange water gibbon bucket and plastic." -- Mr. Burrows
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"stoutman" wrote in message

It is conventional wisdom that waxes which contain silicone may give you problems with some wood finishes. If you want to be on the safe side in this regard, diligent and frequent application of products that contain no silicone, like TopCote, BoeShield and Johnson's Paste Wax are pretty good protection for cast iron surfaces in most climates.
BTW, "Sandflex" blocks are great for removing rust from cast iron surfaces.
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No car wax as it may contain silicone
To remove rust, Top Saver is fantastic. Comes in a spray bottle and has the plastic scrubbies in the package.
To avoid rust, use either Top Cote, Boeshield, or a paste wax like Johnson's Wax.
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To paraphrase the wisdom of Unisaw A100 the best way to avoid rust on a tool top is to use the tool. The only time I get rust on my tools is when I take a bit of time off from the woodshop. With regular use they stay shiny and clean.
--
Jeff P.

"A ship carrying blue paint collided with a ship carrying red paint. The
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On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 00:04:10 -0600, "Jeff P."

Very true.
A bit of wax helps the action, though.
Barry
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Jeff P. wrote:

Lately I'm leaning towards the thinking that with the low humidity where we live (don't tell the others/they'll just want to move here) we're pretty lucky. I run the de-humidifier during the "warm" weeks (that period between July 1 and July 30) and do almost nothing the remaining months. Also, you and I do have our shops located correctly (basement/in a conditioned space). I don't wax my machine surfaces at all and I don't see a lick of rust.
Also, I painted my shop floor and walls and while I don't think it sounds like much I think that has created a great vapor barrier.
And it does help to use the machines.
UA100, edgebanding white PVC today onna 'count of the Lee Valley order came yesterday...
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[...]

And does the Paint stay? The cellar I use as a workshop has a wall that someone painted with shiny green impenetrable paint, and the moisture that wants to come out of the wall has pushed the paint togeter with the plaster off the wall (it's a standard elderly german house with stone walls and no special tricks to keep moisture out)
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Juergen Hannappel wrote:

Because of schedule (we needed to get into the house) I used regular old porch paint (a latex product) from (insert big box store here) and it's held up pretty well. There are many,many, many quarter (twenty five cents) sized spots where the paint has lifted but for the most part I'd have to say that 99.50% of the floor is still covered.
I did go back one day and re-painted a swath around my table saw and it's held up really good, actually looks great. My thinking is to re-paint small sections (4' X 4' or 10' X 10') ever so often until the entire floor is re-painted. I am leaning towards something other than the existing Sea Foam Green.

I used a wall paint with a fungicide and after 5ish years it's held up. The foundation is cinder clock (CMU) construction and somewhere around 45 years old. We do live on the edge of a swamp though and the sump pump cycles all day, all year round. Still, I don't experience rising damp.
UA100
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I use my machines constantly. The weather here has been rainy/humid for weeks. Wednesday I went into the shop and found everything made of metal was "sweating" and needless to say, the table tops all have a small rust forming. I spend quite a bit of time cleaning and protecting them, Johnson's wax is applied regularly and Top Cote is applied more often, if anything just to reduce friction. I've found nothing that eliminates rust entirely. The machines can be fine one day, and have a thin layer of rust the next depending on the weather. For quickly removing the rust, i prefer to mist the tables with WD 40 and lightly wet sand with 600grit sandpaper, then dry with a rag. After that, I apply Johnson's paste wax for protection. The only way to completely prevent rust would be to condition the space and keep humidity low by adding a dehumidifier if needed. --dave

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Dave Jackson wrote:

Cheap box fan! I'm a believer. It's almost magic how well that works. Johnson's paste wax helps too, but wax alone doesn't stand up to the onslaught at certain critical times of year. The trick is to stop the sweating in the first place, which the fan does by keeping the air moving too fast to condense on the cool metal. Or something.
I still get some sweating in obscure corners of the shop that don't get their air stirred up very well, but my rust problems have gone from everything ferrous turning horribly rusty overnight to getting a few odd spots of rust in obscure places a couple times a year.
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On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 12:15:04 -0500, Silvan

Howdy,
I don't dispute that, but...
Why might it work?
I would think that the only variables of significance would be the humidity, and the temperature. The fan would not seem to affect either.
Can anyone help? (Or is this fan thing just coincidence?)
Thanks,
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Kenneth

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Kenneth wrote:

Moving air across the surface causes higher evaporation rate that can help if moisture isn't <too> excessive.
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"Duane Bozarth" wrote in message

... and a fan helps to keep the air at a more even temperature throughout the shop, which also helps.
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You don't turn green wood, do you?
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"Jeff P." wrote in message

Don't count on it. What really matters is the climate you live in, the "climate control" in the shop tailored to that climate, and judicious use of rust preventative techniques and products.
There is no one solution to the problem, and especially not "use" ... unless you're prepared to "use" a tool 24/7 in some climates.
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That will not keep rust off of a tool in a humid climate unless you are using the tool literally non stop. With out using TopCote I get rust over night particularly after I have used it the day before.
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The first year I had my saw I waxed it but then did nothing for a few months Once warm humid day I opened the still cool garage door. I could see it getting a brown haze as I stood there with my mouth open in astonishment. Next day I bought a can of Top Cote.
--
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My new saw 4 years ago rusted over night after I cleaned the coating off the top. 1 coat of Top Cote was not enough for the initial application. Now I reapply about every 6 months. You mentioned Top Saver in another post. IIRC they invented TopCote and sold it to Bostich.
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Car wax is fine, if it's a high-end silicone-free product, like Meguires <sp?> or Mothers. I'll bet Turtle Wax is full of silicone. For that matter, keep the Armor All, Pledge, etc... out of the shop.
To be safe, stick with a good paste wax, available at any good paint store. Good brands are Johnson's, Trewax, Briwax, among others.
If silicone contamination shows up you'll be ready to jump off a bridge.
Barry
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