router fence material

Any comments on material used - MDF versus wood? Just finished white oak base, and will be adding adjustable, sliding faces. Oak would take some work, MDF would take far less.
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chris,
consider baltic birch or melamine. if you do use MDF, i've had success flooding it with many coats of solvent-based poly, diluted with naptha, and then waxing it. makes it much harder and resistant to swelling.
good luck,
--- dz
Chris Carruth wrote:

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My router table fence is an aluminum extrusion, a commercial fence, and came with MDF faces. They even included an extra set of MDF faces. I expected the MDF to get worn away quickly but in fact I am still using the first set and they are in good shape. I say go for it, and make a bunch of replaceable faces so that you can have zero clearance around some of your router bits.
-- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com

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came
set
Maybe it's just me but I made some zero clearance fence faces and I find my dust collection doesn't work as efficiently as with a larger opening. I have my dust collection plenum directly behind the bit and inside the fence. The same thing goes for my table saw. When I use my box joint sled with dado cutters I find that if I completely remove the blade insert the collection system pulls the chips down and away better.
Larry
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