Router bits for experimenting

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I would like to purchase a set of fairly decent but cheap router bits to play around with and determine what I will really want to keep in my stock on a more frequent basis. I do have some I play with from Rockler and Woodcraft and some I will continue to use which are the better grades such as Freud and Whiteside which I can pick up locally. Therefore, can someone recommend a variety set of bits which won't bust the bank and won't bust at first use?
Thank you
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First you need to establish what direction your projects are going to take. If you're going to make cabinet doors or jewelry boxes. Buy good ones you _know_ you're going to use often, then a cheap set for fooling around. I sometimes end up with sets of 24 or 36 bits if I just cannot refuse the deal. Most often along with another order of stuff. Then I use the straight bits and maybe a couple more, but those cheap ones will never go near anything that is important to me as bearings have been known to fail, ruining a job.
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SBH wrote:

Any number of places have "starter sets" of relative sizes and costs; I'd think any would be adequate to simply play with unless you're talking about playing w/ sugar maple or some such and expecting perfection at the same time.
I've never bought anything except what I've wanted/needed; primarily Amana and Whiteside so no direct hands on to go by. But, the Griz generally gets good marks on controlling quality at least reasonably at moderate cost; might give that a look.
Others may have other ideas...
--
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Amana is certainly all there. Carbide.com has excellent pricing on bits.
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Why don't you spend some time with pencil and paper sketching profiles that you might want to use on a frequent basis, and then decide what bits you may need to create them?
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"SBH" wrote:

----------------------------------------------------- IMHO, you can't get there from here.
You might buy a set of basic (1/4,3/8,1/2) cove, round over, and straight bits, maybe even a couple of beading bits.
After that, buy them on an as needed basic.
I've had good luck with infinity in Tampa area.
Check out their "Overstock" prices.
http://tinyurl.com/y89khx3
Lew
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That's what I have done, which is why I have the Freuds and Whiteside, but recently I wanted to experiment with the roundover and I'm not sure what size to get and stick with. Therefore, I thought maybe a set containing a few roundovers, then I can choose what I like the best or, at least know what to buy in a better grade when I know I'll be using it again on better wood.
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"SBH" wrote:
============================> That's what I have done, which is why I have the Freuds and

=========================You lost me.
----------------------------------------- Therefore, I thought maybe a set containing a

-------------------------------
I practice the following:
Garbage wood, garbage bits. Quality wood, quality bits.
If you want to experiment, try some poplar.
As far as mixed brands of bits, who cares.
OTOH, there is no place for junk bits, IMHO.
Have fun.
Lew
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SBH wrote:

What size wood? If 3/4" you are likely to use a 3/8" radius bit most frequently, 1/4" occasionally.
In addition to those I have 1/16, 1/8 and 3/4. I use the 3/4 once in a while, the 1/8 rarely. I've never used the 1/16 (it was part of an auction lot) and likely never will...easier to use a plane and/or sandpaper.
Buy 2-3 decent bits suitable for the stock you use, forget others unless you really, really need them - not likely you will.
--

dadiOH
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On 01/06/2010 07:39 AM, dadiOH wrote:

For those situations where a small round-over is needed, I often find it *much* faster (and a lot more fun) to just use a "SlickPlane":
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
The price is ridiculously low for a device that works as well as it does, and you can put a 1/8" or 1/4" round-over down the length of a four foot board in less than thirty seconds, as fast or faster than a router even if it's all set up and ready to go.
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"I am we Todd it. I am sofa king we Todd it."
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I like the Slick Plane but it only works in a straight line. I made a wine rack which will require a bit for the circles.
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hft
SBH wrote:

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I agree with the recommendation of Grizzly. They have 2 grades of bits. Try the "cheap" ones. MLCS is another source. http://tinyurl.com/yfdt35o
Max
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On 1/5/2010 7:36 PM, Max wrote:

I've used MLCS many times. Large selection, decent bits, good prices, and fast shipping, even when it's free (which it is by default unless you upgrade it). Give them a try; I think you'll be pleased.
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I vaguely remember reading a review of router bits in FWW (?) within the last few years, which rated Oldham bits fairly well. You can get these at HD pretty cheap, I don't know if they have sets.
I might be wrong though. Just ask my wife.
-Zz
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I *did* ask your wife. She says you're right, you're wrong.
:-)
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I've got a Ryobi set from HD. Looks like HD doesn't sell them any longer, but it was a 20-ish bit set with various sizes of straight, cove, and rabbiting bits. I've used most of them, and would recommend such a set. I think the whole thing cost around $60-70.
Mine have 1/2" shafts, and the ones showing on the HD site show 1/4" shafts.
Puckdropper
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Problem is, a good set will cost the bank, likely more that you're presently willing to pay. Since you feel that you're still in the experimentation stage, I'd suggest buying a few cheap ones at a time and experimenting with those until they wear our or burn themselves beyond use.
Go through a few bit listings and pick out a few that seem interesting to use on some project. Most listings show what kind of cut the bits will make.
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I know nothing about these bits and it may be a bait and switch ("100 sets available at this price") for all I know, but PeachTree Woodworking came out with the following email special today ("use keycode: bit1"): http://www.ptreeusa.com/edirect_010510.htm
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Whiteside is the preferred brand. You'll save money by NOT buying sets and buying only the bits you currently need. The 1/2" shank usually costs a little more, but worth it.
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