roubo workbench

I have just about compelted my first roubo workbench. I built it out of 8/4 southern red oak and it looks fairly good, plus it weights between 320 and 350lbs (3 x 26 x 72" - the top alone weights 170lbs). I have a problem though that I need some help with.
I did not cut through mortises for the legs to attach to the top but decided to have some fun and hand chop the 2 x 1.5 x 4" mortises in the top. The leg shoulders were all cut at the table saw using the rip fence, so I know they are all the same length. The legs are all seated firmly (glued and pegged) against the top. The problem is, one leg is a bit long, which gives me a bit of a wobble.
So the question is, how to level the (5 1/4" square) legs? I am seriously leaning toward shimming them, probably with a high density plastic to get the end grain of the legs up off the concrete floor. But before I go that route, any other ideas?
Thanks
Deb
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I'm betting it's your floor and not the length of the leg. But that's a guess.
One method would be to use a belt sander to take down the leg a little. Or use a low angle hand plane if you have one.
On 6/21/2012 10:11 PM, Dr. Deb wrote:

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On 6/21/2012 9:11 PM, Dr. Deb wrote:

How about this?
Prowl around some appliance outlets or maybe a scrap yard and talk to the folks there about any junker washing machines they may have gathering rust. If you don't want to do that, check out the local Sears, Lowes, Home Despot, whatever, look over THEIR selection of new appliances. What you want is the screw in metal feet from said appliances.
They are often finished off with a nice wide diameter metal foot, maybe an inch and half or two inches in diameter with a threaded bolt that screws into the appliance frame to level it.
If you're lucky you will get a junked set of four for free. If you're not, you can probably get EXACTLY what you want for a price using the parts list for that new appliance and letting your fingers do the walking.
Once you have a set, go shopping for some t-nuts. Drill an appropriately sized hole in the center of each leg (don't you wish you'd done this BEFORE you assembled that puppy<g>) set the t-nut and screw in the leveler. You no longer have a wobble and each leg is now up off the concrete and will not wick water into the leg.
If you can't find a leveler that is wide enough to suit your taste, just make sure the shaft is at least 1/4", 3/8" would be better, and get those. Then buy some of those furniture slider pads faced with teflon or ...
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"Dr. Deb" wrote:

The simplest approach is to use shim packs.
Use 1/8" (Door skin) and 1/4" plywood to cut 5-1/4" squares to form packs.
Shim till level, then add 1/2" sheet PVC & flat head screws to hold plastic in place.
Have fun.
Lew
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Forgot to add.
Start with temporary shims that are 4" wide and 10" long.
Working with a pry bar and a hammer, you can insert and adjust the shims by yourself.
Lew
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Why do I have visions of a work bench top 48" above the floor? ;~)
John
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Dr. Deb wrote:

Lew, thanks, that will at least give me the thickness I need on the two short legs, which is on the order of 3/64 or 1/16"
As for Unquestionalby Confused, your idea would work, if the bench were about half its weight. There is no way those feet will hold up to either the weight or the usage of the bench.
Tiredofspam, wrestling that 300-350lbs around is a bit more than this old man can take on. It took three of us to get it up off the top and over on the legs.
Again, lew, thanks
Deb
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Dr. Deb wrote:

Leveling out a 55 ft boat mold that is upside down teaches you a few things,<G>
Have fun.
Lew
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"Lew Hodgett" wrote:

Another approach I've used to level out a loaded table uses some clamps, a couple of 2x4's and a 1 ton bottle jack as follows:
Attach a 2x4 to the right side legs (front to back) with clamps about 12" above floor.
Repeat on left side.
Place bottle jack under 2x4 on right side and lift and shim as req'd.
Repeat as req'd till level.
Tip: A 1 ton bottle jack is low cost ($10 Max) and has lots of uses around shop.
Have fun.
Lew
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I use these on all my benches and stands.
http://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-axminster-heavy-duty-lifting-levellers--pack-of-4-prod362777/#bottomsection
They work a treat.
--
Stuart Winsor

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wrote:

Adjustable feet would be good, Deb. You could mortise out an area for a 3/8" steel plate, drill/tap/mount it, then screw in rubber padded feet. I got the 2515T22 nylon feet for my CNC router from McMasters for $16, delivered. http://www.mcmaster.com/#adjustable-feet/=i370h9 All of 'em. Take your pick.
-- However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results. -- Sir Winston Churchill
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