Rocky 30 Trim Router - 3/8" Collet?

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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote in

Yeah, that's the difference between "center cutting" and "non-center cutting". The non-center cutting are designed to cut on the side of the mill - the workpiece is moved under the cutter from the side, as if you were cutting a groove or rabbet. The center cutting type are designed to cut on the side or end, so they can be plunged into the work and then the workpiece moved (e.g. for a stopped groove).
If I remember correctly (unfortunately my machinist friend passed away earlier this year, so I can't ask him) the non- end cutting mills clear chips better, so can cut faster in a production setting. Which is why both kinds exist.
John
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On 7/24/2016 9:34 AM, John McCoy wrote:

A four flute always has a cutting edge in contact with the material, not necessarily with a 2 flute. So a chattering cut, may require a four flute to calm the cut down.
--
Jeff

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On 7/22/2016 10:03 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

The bigger bushings do not need to flex as much as the smaller bushings. More cuts in the bushing allow for more adjustment. I would not be concerned with the single cut bushing. FWIW my 1/2" bushing/collet has 3 cuts, my 1/4" has 4.
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On Friday, July 22, 2016 at 2:10:00 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

Thanks for that info.
Do you know of anyone that sells 3/8" shank router bits in standard profiles, such as round-overs, chamfers, etc?
Remember, you started me down this Rocky Road, so you're on the hook to help me get the most out of this tool. ;-)
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On 7/22/2016 1:14 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

McMaster Carr has some and here, although I have never bought from the company listed below.
http://tools.toolstoday.com/search?w=3%2F8%22%20shank%20router%20bits
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On Friday, July 22, 2016 at 2:27:31 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

Almost all straight bits at ToolsToday. None of the basic profiles.
I may try some end mills just to see if I can tell any difference.
Thanks!
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The only 3/8th shank router bit I've ever seen was a 3/8th straight bit. It was probably solid carbide, I can't think of another reason not to use either a 1/4 or 1/2 shank.
John
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On 7/22/2016 11:03 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

So here's the thing, many metal working milling bits are 3/8" and WAY cheaper than woodworking bits.
So you can use them. They have 2 flute, 4 flute, some rare 3 flute. ball end, flat, etc... So I would say it is and can be useful. It's whether you will venture to metal working suppliers.. OBTW, the prices to Metal workers, is much less than the price to WW for the same bits.
--
Jeff

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On 7/22/16 9:03 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I bought a 3/8 collet for my big Milwaukee in my router table for the express purpose of using 3/8" milling bits. I've broken enough $$$ 1/2" shank, 3/8" spiral cut router bits to appreciate inexpensive and damn sharp HSS milling bits.
-BR
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