Router collet run-out

I use a Freud FT2000E router in a table, and have noticed recently that there seems to be a small amount of run-out in the cutter rotation. I am having some difficulty working out where this is coming from...
If I use a DTI on the actual router output shaft, its less than 0.03mm. Much the same for inside the shaft as best I can measure. However stick an end baring cutter in it, and the run out at the bearing is around 0.3mm and visible to the eye. Changing the length of protruding cutter from say 35 to 55mm clear of the collet nut, does not actually seem to make it any worse. Just placing the cutter in the collet - even without tightening the nut seems to introduce the eccentricity.
So it looks like the collet itself is causing the problem. I have done all the usual things; cleaned and inspected it and visually it looks ok. If you rotate the collet on the shaft of a bit there is no visible error, and a DTI on the outside of the collet shows none either. So its only when in the shaft that you can see it...
What else can I try?
--
Cheers,

John.

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Throw the collet away?
Perhaps, during previous work, the shaft has slipped causing wear to one jaw more than the others? Poor quality control during collet manufacture leading to improper hardening?
I don't do much routing but find re-tightening necessary after a few cuts.
regards
--
Tim Lamb

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On 05/10/2011 08:17, Tim Lamb wrote:

That may well be the required solution, but since they are about 25 a pop I thought I would check there is nothing obvious first!
This looks like the beastie:
http://www.mtmc.co.uk/Freud-Router-Collets/Freud-FR/12-Replacement-Router-Collet__p-12732580-37313.aspx

Perhaps, although I thought I would have seen that when rotating the collet on the shaft of a cutter (with the cutter held firmly). Perhaps I should check at several places on the taper and see if that has worn unevenly somehow.

This one seems to get a pretty good grip and hang on to it.
--
Cheers,

John.

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Bit more manufacturing work there than I had imagined.

My last job was cutting those window rebates. 45mm depth using a 1/2" shaft straight fluted work top cutter. I wondered why the depth of cut changed and then realised the cutter needed further tightening:-(
I suppose dropping a router on its nose might produce some interesting effects.
regards

--
Tim Lamb

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On 05/10/2011 20:03, Tim Lamb wrote:

Reminds me of my very first B&D "Woodworker" router... the depth lock was feeble and the plunge spring fearsome, so you frequently ended up with tapering depth cuts!

Indeed - although quite hard to do with a plunger router, unless its got a worktop length cutter in it.
--
Cheers,

John.

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