Restoring old shop equipment

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snipped-for-privacy@nono.com wrote:

For the fence and surface (assuming they are cast iron) steel wool and FWD-40 does a great job. Clean and then Johnson's paste wax every 6-9 months. I've only repainted one tool and used Sherwin Williams epoxy. Looks great and has held up fine (5+ years). I have a Delta (Rockwell) scroll saw and belt sander from that era. No lube ports on the sander, saw has an oil reservoir right under the table.
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Daryl wrote:

Wood magazine did a test between several different methods/products for rust removal and prevention. http://www.boeshield.com/rust_prevention/stoprust.pdf
You may find that some of the newer products will save you some time and energy, as WD-40 and Johnson's both did the worst at their respective tasks.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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-MIKE- wrote:

I tend not to believe everything I read, especially when it doesn't jive with my own experience. If I did, FWW would have convinced me a year ago that I needed a 20 ton press to do a panel glue up. Been doing this since '94 when I got my table saw. Johnson's takes maybe two minutes to apply, wait 10 then 2 more to buff off and that only twice a year. The top looks as good today as when I bought it. Now doing the same with all the tools. Not sure what could be easier than that but I should probably stick with this. I could use the excersize.
Just my $0.02
Daryl
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Daryl wrote:

I certainly wasn't telling you how to part your own hair, just sharing info, which is the purpose of this group... I hope. :-)
For your intents and purposes, you probably don't need the best in both categories. If you look at the pictures in the article, you'll see they are letting those surfaces get very rusty... simulating what looks to be "a couple years in the shed" worth of rust.
If I ever have to take off that kind of rust, I'll go with what they recommend and not repeat the learnin' they already learnt. :-)
As for prevention... someone in here recommended this... http://www.super-lube.com/drifilm-aerosol-ez-69.htm ...and I've been using it with great results so far. Plus, it's a multi-tasker and I hate uni-taskers.
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-MIKE-

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Just so you know, I did a comparison of my own, last night, between WD-40 and Boeshield Rust Free rust remover.
There is simply no comparison. I was pretty amazed at the Boeshield. I had some spots of surface rust to remove. WD-40 kind of sits on top of it and doesn't really do much but act as a lube and solvent while you scrub. I don't see it doing much beyond acting as a solvent to help the rust soak up into a towel.
I sprayed the Boeshield on and the rust sort of vanished and turned a different color. It lifted off the surface before I could even reach for the scrubbing pad.
I'm going to do some removal on another tool that has a considerable about of rust on it. I'll report on that later.
Again, I'm not trying to be confrontational. But if you ever need to remove a considerable amount of rust, this Boeshield stuff is worth it.
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-MIKE-

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