Resin help please


I made a loft bed for my daughter some time age and all was fine till now. The reason for this change is that I made the bed a little too high, about 8", and she now keeps hitting her head when she get up.
I have cut the bed down to a more usable size, but the ladder is now leaking resin. The wood is a soft pine, known here as CLS timber, very cheep, but quite good for this type of use. Looks like I've cut through a knot, and I need some help please.
What's the best way of stopping this leakage, keeping in mind that the bed is all waxed?
I was thinking of using shellac to seal the wood, but will this seal be good enough to stop the resin form getting through?
I know I perhaps should have used a little more dense wood, and probably got some of a more seasoned quality, but not knowing where to get that from, and being my first real build I now pay the cost :-( But with your help I'm sure all will be fine in the end ;-)
Any ideas on how to overcome this will be most greatfully received.
Thanks in advance Deb
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Don't know if this will help, but there is a specific product -- laquer-like stuff -- just for this purpose. Generally, you put it on before you paint the final result. I think you have a problem here that is simply due to the kind of wood you have. I had an unfinished cabinet (sold it along with the house), that was painted white. I failed to seal a knot. After about a year, it started to bleed through the paint. PITA...
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win.ntli.net:

This is a typical job for shellac. Cheap, easy to use, fast drying, quick clean-up.
Clean off the wax with mineral spirits or similar, then have at it.
Patriarch
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Traditional, too. Common solvent between varnishes and resin - turpentine. Alcohol, on the other hand is a polar solvent, so resin won't eat it. And vice-versa.
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Patriarch wrote:
> win.ntli.net: > > >> I made a loft bed for my daughter some time age and all was fine till now. The reason for this change is that I made the bed a little too high, about 8", and she now keeps hitting her head when she get up. >> >> I have cut the bed down to a more usable size, but the ladder is now leaking resin. The wood is a soft pine, known here as CLS timber, very cheep, but quite good for this type of use. Looks like I've cut through a knot, and I need some help please. >> >> What's the best way of stopping this leakage, keeping in mind that the bed is all waxed? >> >> I was thinking of using shellac to seal the wood, but will this seal be good enough to stop the resin form getting through? >> > > > > This is a typical job for shellac. Cheap, easy to use, fast drying, quick clean-up. >
Thanks needed a little help to ensure I was using the correct stuff.
> Clean off the wax with mineral spirits or similar, then have at it. > > Patriarch
Thanks for this suggestion, was going to ask what to clean it with.
Again many thanks will let you know how it turns out :-)
Deb
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Now here is a crazy idea. If it's the bottom of the ladder legs how about getting some of that acrylic rubber dip they sell at the borgs for dipping tools in? This would seal the bottom and make it slip proof at the same time. Just make sure the dip comes up the sides of the legs to form a cup.
Hey... I said it was crazy...
Bob S.
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My daughter calls her loft bed, the 'bonk' bed. robo hippy
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BobS wrote:
> Now here is a crazy idea. If it's the bottom of the ladder legs how about getting some of that acrylic rubber dip they sell at the borgs for dipping tools in? This would seal the bottom and make it slip proof at the same time. Just make sure the dip comes up the sides of the legs to form a cup. > > Hey... I said it was crazy... > > Bob S. > > >
From what I remember this plastic is put onto metal by heating the metal to about 120 C and then dipping the heated part you want coated into a fine plastic powder kept at a 'boil' by using an air source.
This would be far tooo much trouble for this problem, but NICE idea.
Thanks for the help
Deb
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No. Open can, dip part. No heat involved.

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