Resaw oddity. . .

. . .I think. To get my feet wet resawing, I sliced a 15/16x11x24 roughly in half. The odd thing was the what the two halves did after the cut. The two halves immediately cupped out in opposite direction, sorta like, (), I would have bet they would go , )), . Is this normal? I need lots of practice but the Grizzly G0555 with the 3/4" Timberwolf blade did not drift off but remained straight down the middle. I did not hold the piece true vertical but not so much that it would be a problem in the planer. I won't be planing the pieces as it was not a very good piece of wood(cypress) to begin with. Any suggestions as to technique and/or/ fence construction would be welcomed.
-- SwampBug - - - - - - - - - - - -
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Yes. it is or, at least, not uncommon.
What you have done is exposed the higher moisture content inner wood and unequilized the tensions in the wood.
Put it aside for a couple of days and it should start to straighten out as the newly exposed wood gives up some of it's moisture. .
Any freshly milled wood, especially if it has only been milled on one side, should be allowed to acclimate for at least a couple of days after it has been milled.
It's always a good idea to mill a couple of fractions oversized to allow yourself some wiggle room should the wood not return fully to the desired shape after it has acclimated.
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
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I think it's the other way around. He said the two halves cupped like (), which indicates that the inside is *drier* than the outside. In any event, your advice to give it a couple of days is dead-on.

-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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Yeah, my main wonder was why the two halves cupped opposite since the grain was obviously same for both. I suppose tho the cupping was more due to the inside being drier than the outside. My shop is not entirely enclosed and I have actually seen fog in it. . .<g> The humidity the last couple of days was near 100% and the temp around the mid 50's during the day as it was today. Tomorrow will tell me more. I just put a pic on ABPW.
-- SwampBug - - - - - - - - - - - -
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This situation is not uncommon, in fact expect some waste. Sometimes it occurs slowly as you let the material aclimatize after its been resawn, sometime it is so acute, it will occur as you are resawing, and trip the breaker for your saw.
Ah...the beauty of wood.
Cheers,
Andy
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I was just over at American Woodworker mag site and saw an almost duplicate case, see link below, as I posted. It was interesting to see that. It means that wood would be very predictable if we understood it better.<s>
http://www.rd.com/americanwoodworker/articles/200008/main/page3.html -- SwampBug - - - - - - - - - - - -

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