repairing cherry table

Some idiot (not me!) put something hot on our cherry table. It left a milky white blush stain (not very large).
What's the best way to repair it? I've done a Google and found that people use a) toothpaste b) a steam iron c) denatured alcohol.
What do you guys recommend?
MJ
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wrote:

Do you know what the finish is? Couldn't really say until that is known.....
Allen
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*IF* you go the iron route, be sure it's *completely* dry, or you'll make the problem worse. You're problem is moisture, if there's any water left in the iron.... well, use your imagination ;-)
First, you really need to know what the finish is.
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> Some idiot (not me!) put something hot on our

Mayonnaise, Helmans, Best Foods(same stuff), etc.
Apply like shoe polish with a soft cloth.
Lew
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Yep, water under the finish.
With poly or lacquer you can rub it with alcohol to try and get it to evaporate. The alcohol enters the finish in the same way as the moisture and as it evaporates it takes the water with it.
The iron is an attempt to do the same thing but dangerous because a few degrees to hot and you bubble the finish.
The mayonnaise idea is a variation on my favorite, mineral oil. The oil displaces the moisture. Rub it fast to generate some heat to help the emulsification, etc.
wrote:

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On Thu, 31 Dec 2009 16:02:11 -0800 (PST), the infamous

Not steaming alcohol-flavored toothpaste with an iron.
-- Sex is Evil, Evil is Sin, Sin is Forgiven. Gee, ain't religion GREAT?
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I vote for the rubbed-in mayonaise treatment.
Sonny
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If you've done the Google search, you have already seen the most common and useful techniques. If all fails, consider contacting a furniture restorer. For recommendations, call local moving companies and furniture stores: both deal with damaged goods and have folks on call to make repairs.
--
Nonny

ELOQUIDIOT (n) A highly educated, sophisticated,
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Though it does not cover the more recent finishes, a look at http://tinyurl.com/d2snmh might prove worthwhile.
Jeff
--
Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
email : Username is amgron
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Nice, I think this is one of these Darwin awards setups. I can just see the guy buring down his house but it sure cured that pesky water ring.
All the same concept, oil replacement and evaporation aided by heat.
Rubbing a walnut! Funny but just oil and heat.

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