Removable Fasteners

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I want to fasten one square wood frame to another in a fashion that can be easily removed. I'm thinking wing-nut sort of thing, but more attractive. Only one side of the piece will be accessible while attaching the frame.
Can someone offer a suggestion as to what to Google on?
Thanks
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How secure does the union have to be? Attaching mating rare earth magnets to each works well if you do not need absolutely no movement.
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Leon write: <<How secure does the union have to be? Attaching mating rare earth magnets to each works well if you do not need absolutely no movement.>>
Movement ok, but it would be relatively heavy for magnets it seems. 3 ft x 5 ft frame, maybe, holding a sheet of glass.
Thanks
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FIY the 3/4" x 1/8" round rare magnets will lift 22 lbs. each. The 1" x 1/8" will lift 30lbs. each.
See.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p2065&cat=1,42363,42348&ap=1
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Rare earth magnets, sliding dovetails, T-nuts or threadserts (aka wood insert nuts) are a few possibilities. You didn't mention how big the frames are and how much load, and in what direction, will be on the fasteners, but you could tap the wood if it's a hardwood then just use machine screws.
R
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I was going to suggest t-nuts also, or possibly "barrel nuts", threaded inserts (probably the same as threadserts?), or pocket-hole screws, if it doesn't need to be dissembled and reassembled too many times. Good luck, Andy
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Andy wrote: << I was going to suggest t-nuts also, or possibly "barrel nuts", threaded inserts (probably the same as threadserts?), or pocket-hole screws, if it doesn't need to be dissembled and reassembled too many times.>>
T-nuts look good. Barrel nuts look attractive, but I'd need one that doesn't require a tool to remove. I'll look for those. Pocket-hole screws would be too difficult to remove quickly
Thank you
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What exactly are you doing? You'll get more creative, and possibly more humorous, answers if the specific application is known. Frinstance, if it's some sort of storm panel or shutter, then I'd recommend vinyl bulb weatherstripping and not worry about perfectly mating surfaces and closely spaced fasteners.
R
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RicoJour wrote:
<<What exactly are you doing? You'll get more creative, and possibly more humorous, answers if the specific application is known. Frinstance, if it's some sort of storm panel or shutter, then I'd recommend vinyl bulb weatherstripping and not worry about perfectly mating surfaces and closely spaced fasteners. >>
Sorry, I was trying not to bore you guys with non-useful information. I am making a storm window of sorts, but it will be on the inside of the window. The purpose is primarily for sound insulation, but I'd like to be able to remove the window quickly should the need arise. Either escaping a fire or washing the windows.
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It's always better to give complete information.
The vinyl bulb weatherstripping would help seal between the frames and also isolate the two frames so sound wouldn't be transmitted through them - probably a minor consideration, but it's the correct thing to do acoustically.
The "sound panel" will be big, heavy and awkward to move. If someone is moving it in a hurry trying to escape a fire, I can easily see someone breaking the glass and having spurting arteries as they're trying to flee. That's probably not a good thing.
Patio doors have tempered glass as required by code. I'm not sure what your local code would require as far as safety glass. Tempered has to be cut to size then tempered, so it's more expensive than laminated safety glass - but either way, code or not, I'd want safety glass for this _emergency_ safety feature.
Hinging the panel would probably be the easiest and safest way to hang it. I'd consider breaking the panel up into two separate panels so they were lighter and easier to operate and less likely to break. You should also pay attention to the space required for the panel swinging out of the way.
Are there storm windows on the outside? That's probably the easiest and cheapest way to get some sound attenuation.
R
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RicoJour wrote:
<<Are there storm windows on the outside? That's probably the easiest and cheapest way to get some sound attenuation.>>
No, there are not, but some casual browsing suggested it was an expensive way to accomplish what I wanted. Couple of hundred per window is my recollection.
I googled on some weight estimates for a 1/4" sheet of glass and came up with 52 lbs for a sheet 96 x 120, which is a lot larger than what I plan. I'll check on the price for tempered glass, but I'm afraid it will be prohibitive
For the windows where absolute quiet is required, I'm slowly building some solid shutters that fit in a Z-Frame where the doors will be 1" thick plywood. For windows where a large sound reduction isn't required, I was looking for a quick and easy solution.
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Old saying in construction, "Fast, cheap or good. I can give you any two of the three. Can't give you all three."
A couple hundred dollars for a storm window that size is pretty reasonable. If you value your time at, oh, say right around zero, building it yourself will be cheaper.
Since you are concerned about the egress with the panel in place, the window in question must be a logical egress path. It would be myopic to create a hazard to save a few bucks. The only people that would get injured would be you and yours, or the people trying to save you and yours. Laminated glass will be cheaper than tempered and you can cut it yourself easily. Another benefit is that the glass panel stays intact when the glass breaks, where tempered breaks into a million little pebbles of glass.
A large single pane of glass is not a particularly good sound attenuator. Have you looked into using a double walled plastic (Kalwall is the big name in architectural double wall), or making a divided light frame that would accept smaller panes of safety glass?
R
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How about using bed rail hardware like this: http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?pageR89 You could mount them on the stiles, either one on each at the top or two on each, one at the top and one at the bottom.
Lee
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Lee Gordon wrote:
<<How about using bed rail hardware like >>

an interior frame to which I will mount the frame with the glass. Seems like it would be tough to get a tight fit with the bed rails.
Thanks
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Greg Esres wrote:

Don't forget some "weep holes".
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RicodJour wrote:
<<sliding dovetails>>
Yikes!
<<threadserts>>
I'll have to study those.
<<You didn't mention how big the frames are and how much load, and in what direction, will be on the fasteners, but you could tap the wood if it's a hardwood then just use machine screws.>>
3 ft x 5 ft frame with 1/4" glass over a window. I want to be able to pull it off fairly easily and quickly, hence the preference not to require a tool to remove it.
Thank you.
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Greg Esres wrote:
> 3 ft x 5 ft frame with 1/4" glass over a window. I want to be able to > pull it off fairly easily and quickly, hence the preference not to > require a tool to remove it.
As the old saying goes, "You can't get there from here."
Unless the glass is in a vertical plane, it will probably break if you look at it cross eyed.
If the glass pane is vertical, the weight is such that unless you are a trained gorilla, even wing nuts won't get the job done.
Just curious, what is the objection to using some kind of tool?
Lew
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Lew wrote:
<<Just curious, what is the objection to using some kind of tool?>>
I'm putting an extra thick sheet of glass in the inside of a window for an improvement in sound insulation. I'm thinking in a fire or an invasion by ninjas, I'd like to get out of the window pretty fast. :-)
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Wed, Jun 6, 2007, 12:30pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@boundvortex.com (GregEsres) doth mumble: I'm putting an extra thick sheet of glass in the inside of a window for an improvement in sound insulation. I'm thinking in a fire or an invasion by ninjas, I'd like to get out of the window pretty fast. :-)
Well, if I figured I'd be needing to get out a window in some event like that, I'd say a 9mm slug or two should do it - I keep a 9mm handy, because I'm anticipating a ninja invasion any minute now. Or, hang a large hammer on the wall next to the wndow - you coud make it decoraton by usng an antique hammer. I would NOT want to dork around turning wingnuts, or whatever, if that was my exit of choice in case of fire. IF you're so cheap you don't want to break the wndow, put hinges along one side, and keep it shut with sliding bolts or something.
Always remember, K.I.S.S. If you don't know what that means. you'd better find out fast.
JOAT If a man does his best, what else is there? - General George S. Patton
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Lew wrote:
<<If the glass pane is vertical, the weight is such that unless you are a trained gorilla, even wing nuts won't get the job done.>>
Hmmm...I haven't given much thought to the weight. I have no idea how much a sheet of glass this size would weigh. Seems like 1/4" would be strong enough not to break easily, though. Surely the thickness of a sliding glass door is about that.
As for removing it by hand....perhaps a hinge might be easier. <sigh> Decisions, decisions. Thanks
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