reducing the size of a doorway


Hi, I want to replace a door in my kitchen which measures 82" x 34". I've been told that i would have to get one made specially. A builder friend suggested that i 'plate' the doorway to reduce it to a standard size. Is this a straightforward job?
Many thanks in advance,
David
--
pistolknight


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I'm about to do the same thing in my laundry room, 36" down to 33". Just as soon as I seal up all the 100yr old laundry plumbing.
I'm figuring to just basically build out the jam side with the last piece maybe a harder wood, like poplar. Install door hardware on new door and paint. Carefully reuse the existing hinges and replace the threshold. Hope I can get it installed straight/plumb.
I'm using a half window slab door, rather than prehung.
Recommendations ?
Bart
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On Tue, 24 Jan 2006 21:31:33 +0000, pistolknight

Very simple process:
1) Buy 12 pack 2) Give 12 pack to builder friend 3) Get out of the way
But seriously, all he's saying is add a board on the sides, and likely on the top. The moulding will cover the seam as long as you don't build it out too much on one side.
-Leuf
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Standard size replacement door would be 80"x34", Should be available pre hung in many styles at most builder supply stores. Remove the old casing and replace it with the new complete door. There should only be a small space left above the new casing. A stoop if applicable will raise the door slightly also. You can easily block this and refinish the existing walls. Or even just use the door case trim if it is wider than the 2 inch gap. ( The door casing should not be load bearing.) Take care to plumb the sides and level the top and leaving a proper bottom clearance. The existing stud framing should have a 1"+/- side space to allow for this using shim stock after removing the old casing..
$.02, Chipper wood
wrote:

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Chipper Wood Wrote: > Standard size replacement door would be 80"x34", Should be available > pre

> casing and

> space

> walls. Or

> The

> and

> stock

> likely

Hi folks, many thanks for your speedy replies. Tonight i removed the old stops from the lining and i'm now left with an opening of 860mm x 2085. I'm thinking that i can just add to each side and the top, to take the doorway in to suit the 80" x 32" standard door that i have my eye on. Does this sound ok?
My next problem, the door i intend to buy is made of hardwood ( it's actually an external door) but i want it to be white to match in with my white gloss cupboards and cranberry red walls. Is there any problem with painting it?
--
pistolknight


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wrote:

Nope. If too much or too busy to do yourself, "promise" the 12-pack after a job well done.
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On Tue, 24 Jan 2006 21:31:33 +0000, pistolknight

I assume what he means is adding to the jam to make the opening smaller. It looks like you need to add 1 full inch to each side to get the opening down to 32" for a 2/8 door. I think it could be done but it might be hard to hide the edges of the pieces you have added.
Is it possible to remove the casing on the inside and outside, remove the door, install the new jam and door and replace the casing with 1" wider casing inside and out?
Mike O.
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pistolknight (in snipped-for-privacy@diybanter.com) said:
| Hi, I want to replace a door in my kitchen which measures 82" x | 34". I've been told that i would have to get one made specially. A | builder friend suggested that i 'plate' the doorway to reduce it to | a standard size. Is this a straightforward job?
Maybe yes, maybe no. You've walked into a big roomful of woodworkers; but you haven't (yet) asked if it'd make sense for you to consider _building_ a replacement door!
So I'll ask you: What are your woodworking skills? What do you have in the way of tools and/or shop? Are you willing try something new?
There are a lot of mentors, coaches, and skilled people around here who'd be willing to provide guidance - and it's not as difficult a project as you might think...
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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On Tue, 24 Jan 2006 21:31:33 +0000, pistolknight

Look into buying a 2-10 7-0 door and trimming it for height.
http://www.kolbe-kolbe.com/files/brochures/KolbeAdvantageDoors.pdf Tom Watson - WoodDorker
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)
http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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Tom Watson Wrote:

Hi Tom, many thanks for the link. However, i live in Scotland and it is a little bit harder to find a 2'10 x 7' door. I think i would have to get one custom made. If i had more time and was a bit more accomplished in woodwork, i would certainly try to make my own.
Regards, David
--
pistolknight

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Consider shooting for a 36" door instead. That way you avoid the issues of paint/wallcovering that would have to be touched up on either side of the casing. A standard 34" rough opening would be on the order of 36 to 36 1/2 inches. If you would then replace the trimmers on each side with 1x4's you would gain another 1.5". That would give 37 1/2 to 38 inches. 38 would be enough for a pre-hung 36" door. If it is a load-bearing wall you would probably want to reinforce the header to king stud connection with a metal header hanger due to the reduced bearing on the trimmers. This may or may not be necessary, depending on the load from the 2nd story (if applicable), roof system etc, but I would just to be on the safe side. If it's just a partition I wouldn't worry about it. Of course, that still leaves a little bit of height to make up. You could hold the door off the floor a bit, use wider casing, or just patch the wall finish.
Charlie

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My apologies. I am not the OP, but the MeToo poster. This topic is much more suited for alt.home.repair. I forgot where I was.
Bart
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