Recommendations for good circular saw?

Page 2 of 2  
Consider buying a used Skil77 worm drive. They can be had for 35-50 bucks at most used tool/pawn shops. The blade is on the left so you can see your cut line. "Sidewinders" (non-worm drive saws) are noted for their propensity to kick back in your face should they bind up--I personally think they are the most dangerous of all hand-held power tools we use. Worm drives are mostly heavy--13+ pounds--but this is sometimes an advantage when it's in a heavy cut, such as full-depth cutting on a 6x6 post. Don't get me wrong, one of my saws is an 8 1/4" Super Sawcat-a sidewinder-with a 40 tooth blade. If buying used, plug 'er in and listen to it run---shouldn't be any growling noises, rumbling noises, etc.. I worked construction for years--never wore out a worm-drive. An occaisional brush change and changing lube in the gearcase is all that's really needed/ Roger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 02 Jan 2004 16:23:17 -0800, roger wrote:

I've got a Skil. The Festool system is a whole 'nuther matter.
http://www.minutemantool.com/Festool/plungecutsaws.html
-Doug
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Skil 77 is a great saw - remember when we used to call any hand-held circular saw a "Skilsaw"?
We have a couple of 25 - 30 year old 8 1/4" B&D Super Sawcats that just won't die (and various framers *have* tried to kill them over the years), but B&D seems to no longer makes commercial/professional lines, that's Dewalt's province (Dewalt and B&D have been the same company since the 1950's). I have a circa 1990 Super Sawcat that uses the same parts as the current Dewalt 8 1/4" circular saw, but I don't think it's built as well as the old ones. Heck, if the saw never wears out, they can't sell you a new one ....

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I respectfully disagree.
Sure, if you're just gonna slice some 2x4s or do other kinds of carpentry, on occassion, get a cheapie.
If you're gonna try to do ww'g, spend the extra for a decent saw. There're adjustments (squaring up the blade to the base, for example) on a good saw not found on the cheap ones that are important. Other features include a better, heavier base plate. Better bearings, prolly. Don't need to go all the way to the Skil wormdrive saw (which is heavy), but for just over $100, you can get something pretty dang good.
I often use the circular saw to cut plywood sheets to more manageable sizes, since I have a hard time handling a full sheet on the table saw. Don't want an out of square, etc. cut here to add to aggravations.
Depends what you're gonna be using it for and how often. But, if you can afford it, I'd reccommend the splurge for a better quality saw.
Renata

smart, not dumb for email
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You can find good and bad circle saws for about the same money. One of the models that keeps showing up on top, and is reasonably priced is the Porter Cable 743. I have a review of it with photos and stuff at the link below.
http://www.newwoodworker.com/pc743Krevu.html
tom Hintz www.newwoodworker.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@newwoodworker.com (Tom Hintz) wrote in

I keep wishing for a quiet one, because I'm tired of putting on earplugs :-)
ken
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (Dave) wrote in message
Makita makes a good circular saw, I think the model number is 5007FK. I've owned this saw for 3 years, and have been very happy with it. It has plenty of power, the adjustemnets for depth and bevel angle are very easy, and to me the visibility to the front tip of the blade is a little better on this saw than some the others in this class. It comes with a good quality blade as well, and an edge guide, at least when I bought mine it did.
Top of the line in circular saws generally means a worm drive saw like the Skil model 77 or Makita hypoid saws. Those saws are high torque, but heavier to handle. If you're cutting framing lumber all day long, you might consider one of those, but for plywood, or 3/4" material, they may be overkill.
Other brands I'd look at...? Milwaukee, Bosch, Dewalt, Porter Cable... they all make good tools. I would stay away from anything at the low end like B&D, Craftsman, Ryobi, Rigid.
Also, consider a long edge guide like a clamp-n-guide to go with your circular saw. I think you'll find it very useful to make straight and accurate cuts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (Dave) wrote in message Bob is hobby woodworker and Festool ISA. Due to the fact that he uses the tools himself he has an incredible knowledge. Many folks on the net buy from him and are nothing but happy with his service.
I can assure you that I don't work for Festool or revieve any money from them. I'm a satisfied customer and wanted to pass this on.
Regards,
Christian Aufreiter, Austria
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Look at the latest tool guide at the bookstore (FWW). Readers choices are the Porter Cable and the Milwaukee. LN
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gents,
Great feedback thus far...very helpful! Allow me to elaborate a bit--and add a couple more questions.
I truly AM a novice WW'er, and early on will be using the circ. saw in place of a table saw (which I hope to purchase in the next year or so), mostly for low-level cutting. I don't foresee heavy-duty needs at this point.
Reading thru the responses has created some additional questions--primarily due to my inexperience. Explanation (keep it simple) is appreciated.
--What is a "worm drive", and how will I know one when I see one-and why would I need this? --Bearings? Bushings? Whats their role--and how do they determine the saws quality? And how will I spot the better ones? --Terms like "end play" and "runout" were mentioned (bad things). What are these? --What types of blades are best for different applications? I assume the more teeth, the smoother the cut...is this true?
Finally, an update: Thru some "bonus points" I earned with my company, I had a choice of various products...including tools. Nothing else was very appealing, so with my "points" I chose the only circular saw listed--a B&D 12amp (no model #), and also a B&D rotary tool that comes with a variety of bits.
I get the impression this is pretty cheap stuff--but will it do? Or should I just immediately post it on eBay, and hope to make enough for a dinner at Olive Garden?
Thanks, & keep the good advice coming, Dave dmchace@Comcast(nospam).com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3 Jan 2004 20:13:16 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (Dave) wrote:

a worm drive is a mechanical system for changing the direction and speed of a shaft. it involves two very strange looking gears: one looks like a barber pole (the worm) and the other looks more like what you might think a gear should look like. this is the drive system used between the blade and motor of saws like the skil77 and makita hypoid saw.

you won't see the worm drive unless you take the saw apart. ; ^ ) here's what a skil77 looks like (on the outside) http://www.skil.com/Products/Tools/Circular+Saws/product.htm?id=HD77

bearings and bushings support and orient the rotating parts. once again, these are internal parts. for a handheld saw you will want pretty much all ball and roller bearings. avoid saws with bushings.

end play is the looseness of a shaft (like the one holding your saw blade) parallel to its axis. runout is eccentricity perpendicular to the shaft's axis.

sort of. this is a pretty broad field. I'd recommend you go to a real tool store- one that supplies tools to the woodworking trades, not home despot or mall wart and talk to the folks there for a while.

I think I'd keep 'em and use them up. pretty soon your skill level will exceed what those tools can do. when that happens you can either give them away or do something like put an abrasive blade on the saw and use it for cutting metal or concrete. that'll kill it off quick....
meanwhile you'll be getting a little time in trying out a saw.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(Dave) wrote:

will suffice. The only reason I have one is because a carpenter friend of mine gave me his old one after cutting through the cord for the third time (now 10" long) and after a first floor fall and a second floor fall (now has a bent shoe and adjustments, and no top handle). It still runs like a mad bull, I use it for demolition, cutting masonry and metal.
Steve ----------------8<--------------snipped
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.