Re: What is it? LXXVII

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On Thu, 01 Sep 2005 12:32:42 +0200, Nick Mόller put fingers to keyboard and said:

I'd think for likely it's for (re)loading shotgun shells
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442: screw/bolt extractor 443: smithing hammer, for getting into highly raised work 445: marking knife 447: haybale lifter thingy. The lifting point is between the gear teeth. The lever is the release thingy that would have a line on it
yours, Michael
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Michael Houghton wrote:

...
Don't think it's a hayhook although I suppose it could have been used as such.
Can't get much of a feel for the overall size as I have no idea what the 19" dimension is in reference to, but I'm thinking it looks more like a light logging hook than for hay purposes.
But, hey, who knows what them crazy Canadians did, eh? :)
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On 01/09/2005 2:19 PM, Duane Bozarth wrote:

Heyyyy, I resemble that remark!
I agree, too small for a hay hook, which typically only had one hook with a T-handle. At least when I loaded hay those many years ago. Nowadays it's giant round bales and a forklift, except for the local Mennonites and Amish who still load horse-drawn wagons and loaders with pitchforks.
Logging hooks are not usually big, at least not the handheld ones. There's a practical limit to how big a log a couple of loggers can lift.
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Doug Payne wrote:

That's a hand hook for bundles or small square/round bales...
A double-hook similar to that shown was used often for loose hay in lofts, loading/unloading wagons, etc. For that purpose it seems far to small and I've not seen one w/ the ratchet mechanism, either.

And, of course, don't forget the 40 or 60-ft boom stacker... :)
Here most everbody simply uses a balefork on the tractor for moving just a few. Almost everybody has gone to the 2T round here as well.

That's why I made my guess...I'm thinking this one might have been used w/ a team. (But what do I know--ain't no trees within 200 miles of here... :) )
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Regarding 447: Perhaps a clamping hook for pulling roots and smaller stumps in clearing farm land. Agree that it is much too small and heavy for a bale-grabber and too small for a loose-fodder fork, which more typically have an 'armspan' of 6 feet or more.
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Fred R wrote:

I'm thinking it was more like a "skidder" hence the latch mechanism?
Doesn't look tough enough to me for rough work such as the stump puller although that's hard to judge from the picture--if knew how much it weighed might help to judge.
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I agree! Puller for thornbrush, small stumps, etc. we used was more like a pair of scissors, made of 1/2" thick steel with short chains attached to handle ends & a ring where you hooked the pull chain.
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The overall length in the first photo is 19".
Rob
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442. Broken drill bit
443. Sheet metal tool, perhaps. Set the ball end against the piece being worked and strike the other end of the head with a mallet.
444. I'd guess it clamps to a bench and something gets turned. Possibly the piece with a longer handle isn't actaually part of it.
445. Used for scribing designs in wood.
446. Defective ice cube tray
447. Part of a crane, used for picking up the new apprentice by the shirt.
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The vent core?
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Haven't been able to confirm what it is, here are the guesses so far:
-note holder -static electricity dischargers -puncture test tool -grandfather's clock mechanism -weights for the scales of justice -for electrical experiments -durometer -tester for finding the hardness of optical pitch -spindle for paper -for making indentations in metal -standard lightning rod balls and needles -for gravity experiments -desk decoration
Rob
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I believe you got it correct, but the image is "upside down."

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Sam Soltan wrote:

But why the nice wood stand?
Maybe a store display for a place which sold such things?
And presented upside down to reduce the chances of ripping someone's clothes or flesh?
(It's hard for even me to believe what I just wrote.)
Without the spike parts I'd be tempted to say they had something to do with some very cold weather and two different size metallic monkeys. :-)
Jeff
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OK! You've done it now!
I know this trivia (being in the explosives industry), but most don't.
WHAT does it mean to "freeze the balls off a brass monkey"?
This sort of fits into the "What is it? LXXVII" series.
LLoyd
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On 9/6/05 7:27 AM, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

OK...here's my take on the expression (but I may be wrong....lol).
I grew up in the UK and at one time it was very common to see 'brass monkeys' sitting either on the mantelpieces above a fireplace or in the hearth depending on the size. I have seen them range in size from solid brass ones at about 1" tall to hollow brass ones about 12" tall and they are always cast as a single piece.
In every example I saw the monkeys are sitting on their haunches, knees up, and are either sitting in a straight line or in a slight curve. Each of the monkeys has his hands in a classic pose and they are named according to that pose. One will have his hands over his eyes and is known as 'See No Evil', the second will have his hands over his ears and is known as 'Hear No Evil' while the third has his hands over his mouth and is known as 'Speak No Evil'. It is my belief that they date originally from the pre-Victorian era (possibly of Japanese origin)and represent a lesson in morality i.e. a person of decent morals will neither see no evil, hear no evil nor speak no evil.
Now, it is very common in the UK for a well known phrase, expression or myth to become plagiarized and develop a whole new meaning. It is quite possible that this has happened in this case. If you consider the sitting positions of the monkeys their testicles would have been in contact with, or very close to, the ground (if they were sitting outside on the ground of course). In very cold weather that would have left them frozen (possibly to the ground)and if the monkeys were to stand up they could have left their testicles behind. Hence the phrase 'Cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey'.
Some examples of the monkeys can be found in the links below (some of which also point to a Japanese origin).
http://www.aogiftshop.com/images/31164.jpg
http://tinyurl.com/bs4ey www.oldcopper.org/three_wise_monkeys.htm
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Nope. But it does have something to do with balls. <G> LS
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Lloyd Sponenburgh writes:

That's what you think.

The answer is that if this phrase ever referred to anything specific, it's no longer known for sure.
Larry Green answers:

This is as good an explanation as any -- simple hyperbole.
Lloyd now comments:

Lloyd needs to read these references:
<http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-bra1.htm <http://www.snopes.com/language/stories/brass.htm
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Nope, it has a quite definite etymology, but a rather exotic one.
LLoyd
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The story I've heard is that it refers (in some way I could never figure) to cannonballs and powder monkeys on Naval ships.
I don't believe this though ... it has a certain aura of implausibility to it, and just *feels* like a back-formation. I've certainly never seen convinving evidence of it.
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