RE: Time Will Tell

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Ditto that. Three or four years back I spent $72 for two Primecell rebuilds for a 12v Mikita impact driver. I didn't need the tool right away but wanted to have the availability if I needed. Several months passed before I had that need. The Primecell rebuilds wouldn't even take a charge.
Dave in Houston
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On Friday, October 17, 2014 8:42:09 PM UTC-5, Dave in Texas wrote:


ay


ge.
I remember Leon's post about that from some years back. I had a Makita bat tery rebuilt here in town by a company that specializes in rebuilt batterie s for older tools, but will do newer ones as well. They rebuilt my battery for my beloved Makita 14.4v monster, and it worked great. However, they w ent out of business.
One of the reasons I finally decided on the Ryobi was because of the lack o f ability to find good rebuilds along with the my problem of putting a $90 battery in an 8 year old drill. Looking at the Ryobi, it came with two bat teries (granted, low milliamp models) but they recharge in 30 minutes. The y also come with a three year battery warranty along with the rest of the t ool. If lost, they can be replaced with an exact match for $35. You can al so buy up the battery amperage and get much stronger batteries for a few do llars more.
After trying out the drill and driving a hundred or so screws with no pilot hole, I think this will be fine for me. The drill wasn't close to breathi ng hard. Even as a contractor, I don't drill more than a hundred holes or drive more than a hundred screws all at once very often. So I don't have t he huge battery needs a lot of guys do. And if I did, the other battery is charged and waiting be used, and another fully charge battery is only 30 m inutes away.
I am totally off any rebuilds for now. If my tool failed when using it on a job and the failure was due me being a little too tight with a buck by bu ying a rebuild I would be really pissed off myself.
Robert
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On 10/18/2014 3:03 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Dave in Texas wrote:

Primecell does not make the batteries and probably most of the rebuilders use the same brand of cells. I have to wonder if that would have happened with any other one. You do have to charge them even if not used.

am totally off any rebuilds for now. If my tool failed when using it on a job and the failure was due me being a little too tight with a buck by buying a rebuild I would be really pissed off myself.

Ryobi seems to have many followers for the reasons you state. One fellow I know just tosses it every few years and buys a new set of cordless tools.
I had a bad experience with a drill needing repairs and that is why I moved up to the Panasonic. Could have been one of ten or ten million that broke though. It was an OK drill when it was working.
At work we needed a light drill for a lot of small sheet metal screws. It was just one project and would rarely be used again. I bought a 12V Rigid and it did a fine job. That was 7 years ago and the batteries will still take a charge, but don't know for how long. I should replace them give it to someone that can use it as it just sits now.
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On Saturday, October 18, 2014 8:11:16 AM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:


Yessir, and I made that reference in an earlier thread somewhere around her e. It seems to be a trend. I don't think most "high performance" "profess ional tools" are worth the money these days. I make a living with my tools so I don't save a dime to spend a dollar, but so many of the more expensiv e tools we see these days are not much better quality than the home owner v arieties it is pathetic.
40 years ago when I saved up to buy a real Milwaukee "hole shooter" it was a big drill. $90 for a corded drill 40 years ago! Used on the job nearly daily for a decade and off and on since then, it still runs. I have worn o ut more circular saws than I can count from my days as a production house/c ommercial framer, and then as a contractor. Milwaukees were the top of the heap then. My oldest Milwaukee is around 30 years old, and I finally got tired of rebuilding it with switch, bearings and cord when it came up to $1 25 or so to do it. But... it still works. My oldest Milwaukee Sawzall wi th the all aluminum housing and red lightening bolts down the side was my o nly recip saw for years and years. I bought it in a pawn shop for $50 buck s in the late 70s, and it still goes to the job once in a while when I need it. (It was replaced with a 15amp monster oscillating recip model.)
I wear out tools now, so I always look at performance first, then bang for the buck. If I worked in a shop like Leon and NO ONE ELSE touched, handled or used my tools (rumor has it Karl was allowed to use the Domino machine only under close supervision, then just once...!) I would most likely buy F estool or brands similar and know they would last me the rest of my life.
But I have to balance the price with the fact that my tools might get dropp ed or knocked off a scaffold or ladder (by me!), be used in the rain, subje ct to misuse by others, theft, or anything else out of my area of control. On a job, $hit just happens sometimes.
I am hoping that this new Ryobi drill/driver set fills the bill for a while . I am not really at risk for many dollars, and although now I find I use t he impact driver much less than I thought I would it is a handy tool when n eeded. For its warranty, I almost bough the Rigid 18v li drill, but the ha ndles are just too damn small for my mitts.
Robert
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

------------------------------------------------------ SFWIW, got a flyer from HD indicating that for the next week, this drill is $14.99.
While in the process of getting a drill, also needed some drill bits.
Gone are the days when I needed full sets of number drills, fractional drills and brad point drills. Now all I need is something to meet my DIY needs and a way to store them away.
To that extent, Ryobi/Home Depot offered the following:
http://tinyurl.com/lnypxc8
Somebody had done the marketing about as well as it can be done.
Multiple copies of the popular sizes, a full range of sizes from 1/16" thru 1/2" with a step down shaft to 3/8" for the 1/2" drill, and a well built non metallic drill index storage.
Price: $11.00.
The only draw back is these are black oxide drills.
Not something I would expect to be able to use on a daily basis, but I no longer need that kind of performance.
If I do a project that requires high usage of a
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Opps, hit the wrong key. ---------------------------------------
Lew Hodgett wrote:

----------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------- If I do a project that requires high usage of a particular size, there is always Grainger down the street.
Again, time will tell.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

------------------------------------------------ Thanks to Puckdropper for suggesting a timer for the battery charger, made another trip to HF where I found a suitable timer for $4.99.
Let's see now, two (2) cordless drills, a drill index box of drill bits and a timer.
Not only is this becoming an investment of note, but also an engineering project.
Oh well, keeps me out of bars at night and wild women on the week ends.
Lew
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On Thu, 16 Oct 2014 19:40:22 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

I really don't want to know what you're doing with your drills.
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Lew, we are taking the trip on the RYOBI drill bits together. When I boug ht the drill, I decided to set it up as a kit since there was room in the b ag. So the RYOBI drill/driver set also has RYOBI drill bits to go along wi th it. I hate looking for bits, etc., as when I am ready to go, ..I am rea dy to go!..
So indexes, while they don't have usually have the best quality bits in the m, keep the bit organized, all in one place, and protect themselves from ru bbing around on one another to dull the bits while in transport or in the t ruck.
I have so far found the bits to be satisfactory as I have never needed numb ered drills as 90% of my work is woodwork, and my metal work is roof flashi ng and other water diverting fabrication that requires only 1/8" drill for rivets. Most of the screws I use on my metal work are self tapping, so not a lot of metal drilling these days.
So the RYOBI bits have worked well so far. I have drilled a lot of wood, p lastic, and other soft stuff and a few smaller holes in metal with them. T hey work just fine. I did drill some 3/16 soft steel plate holes a while b ack an the bits did fine, using pneumatic nail gun oil as a lubricant. Lik e everyone else, I would rather have a professional grade index from BluMol , Lennox and the like, but this is 1/5 the cost and does what I need for no w.
The only numbered bits I have these days are in the little case with my tap and die set that I use once every ten years.
Since I drill a lot of pilot holes for wood screws and nails, I am not that interested in the exact bit to be used. I still use the same old method I was taught, and that was to match a bit to the screw that allowed you to s ee the entire thread of the screw, but no the shaft itself (unless fastenin g soft wood). With that in mind, I have bought a grab bag of resharpened d rill bits from HF before, and they were as good as any bits I have ever bou ght, period.
They are from some manufacturing industry, maybe event their own, and the c ome really sharp, properly along the length of the shaft as well, and strai ght. These bags of bits aren't always available and when I have found them they come in all lengths, sizes and twist variations. Perfect for wood wo rking. They aren't marked with sizes (I don't need that) but are very fine ly ground and finished. They sell a big bag of bits covered in oil that ha s about 25 to 30 bits or so for $7. They are all smaller sizes like 3 3/32 nds to about 5/16ths, and no guarantee which sizes you get. They also have a jumbo size, which only has a few really large bits in them, but they are too large for my wood working needs.
Robert
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On 10/17/2014 3:00 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I have never seen those at HF. But they are 1 hour away in every direction so I don't get there that often.
Drill bits are the type of thing that I can resharpen pretty good, better than most new bits. The only thing I need new ones for are the finer bits that break.. I try buying the jobber lots of the smaller bits.
--
Jeff

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The major drawbacks to the Harbor Freight cordless drill is the recharge time (3-5 hours) and there is no indication that the battery is finished recharging.
Below is an automatic shut off circuit using standard shelf componets.
Enjoy.
Lew ------------------------------------------------------------------ Hardware:
1, 6 circuit switched power outlet strip. 1, Manual 24 hour timer with two switched outlets. 2, LED night lights.
Directions:
Program the timer to be "ON" for 5 hours and "OFF" for 19 hours.
I used "ON" at 00:00 (midnight) and "OFF" at 5:00 AM.
Plug timer into power outlet strip.
Plug an LED night light into power outlet strip.
Plug an LED night light into 24 hour timer outlet.
Plug the 24 VDC "WallWart" from the Harbor Freight recharger module into a 24 hour timer outlet.
Plug 24 VDC plug from the "WallWart" into the Harbor Freight recharger module and insert battery to be recharged.
Plug power outlet strip into a source of power.
Rotate timer cam until it just touches the "ON" cam.
Turn the power outlet strip "ON".
The LED night light plugged into power outlet strip should turn "ON".
When the cam turns "ON", the LED night light plugged into a timer outlet will turn "ON" and the RED and GREEN lights on the battery charger will turn "ON".
After 5 hours, the timer will turn "OFF", the LED night light plugged into timer outlet will turn "OFF" and the RED and GREEN lights on the battery charger will turn "OFF".
At this point, turn the power outlet strip "OFF".
The LED night light plugged into power outlet strip should turn "OFF".
Remove the battery and allow to cool.
NOTES:
The timer only allows the recharger to be on for 5 hours and then turns "OFF" for 19 hours.
It will recycle if you haven't if you haven't turned off the power during that 19 hour period.
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Why do you need all the extra stuff? The LED night lights and power strips? I just plug the timer in, set the off time to the charge time, and let it go. If you buy a timer that uses pins, all you have to do to disable the "on" function is remove the pin. (Others require a bit of cutting with a knife...)
You do need to remove the battery from the charger, though, as many NiCD chargers don't include any kind of discharge protection (a fancy way of saying an ultra cheap --less than $0.01/charger-- diode.) It's usually not too bad, though. Catch it the next day or something and you'll still have most of a full charge.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 10/20/14, 1:57 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
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On 10/25/2014 7:47 AM, Brewster wrote:

The pay back time is not that bad. If you are saving 184 watt hours per day, then you are saving 67.16 kilowatt hours per year. If you pay $0.12 per kilowatt hour then your savings is $8.06 per year. If you pay $0.35 per kilowatt hour then your savings is $23.51 per year. (I chose those rates since those are the numbers on the sliding scale on my electric bill.)
Dan
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On 10/25/14, 1:15 PM, Dan Coby wrote:

Not Watt hours, these are Watt/days.
Point being, having things on a timer can save some cash. My electric water heater is on a timer, basically it is set to run for an hour in the early morning, cost savings shows maybe 15% over the pre-timer days (water heating is metered separately so it's easy to verify). As pointed out however, sometimes the cost of equipment can far exceed the savings 8^)

--- ---
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On 10/26/2014 8:07 AM, Brewster wrote:

A kilowatt hour is 1000 watts of power being used for 1 hour. The electric company bills for kilowatt hours used.
Your power usage for the chargers was 8 watts. Every hour you were using 8 watt hours (or 0.008 kilowatt hours). Each day you save 184 watt hours (or 0.184 kilowatt hours). So you save 0.184 kilowatt hours per day. Each year you save 365 times 0.184 kilowatt hours = 67.16 kilowatt hours per year.

Dan
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On 10/26/14, 11:58 AM, Dan Coby wrote:

Oops, yes I missed my cents/dollars error. The $10/year savings ( I pay about $0.15/kWh) will buy me a new battery when my current one dies.
-BR

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Why reinvent a cheaply made charger? Buy a good drill and save more in the long run. I'll never waste another dime on a Harbor Freight drill.
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wrote:

+1
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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

To be fair, the last time I asked HF Drill, the same one Lew bought, to help me mix paint for two days it did not disappoint. But a "driver" it is not.
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