Re: Putting 10 lbs. of Tools In a 5 lb. Shop

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"Too_Many_Tools" wrote:

I did this one years ago.
Buy a set of metal shelves about 84"-90" H as wide as practical (30"-36")
WW Grainger sell cardboard shelf boxes in bundles of 25.
You simply fold them to form a box.
They come in 2"-4"-6" widths and fit a standard 12" deep shelf.
A couple of Sharpies for labeling and you are good to go.
RULE 1:
Everything on that set of shelves MUST be in a shelf box.
RULE 2:
If in doubt, refer to RULE 1.
YMMV
Lew
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Simple. It's like the Law of Conservation of Energy. It's Called Conservation of Space. Either throw out the tools that don't fit, or Build A Bigger Shop.
I'd build a bigger shop, myself. If you decide to throw stuff away, post descriptions here first. If the tools are any good, I bet some of us would pay shipping to "dispose" of them for you.
Mike Eberlein
Too_Many_Tools wrote:

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When making wall cabinets, plain doors waste a lot of space. If you make the doors 3-6" deep, you can fit loads of nail and screw (and other small stuff) storage in the doors. Fit bearing hinges to take the weight, and some kind of ledge to hold the doors square when closed.
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- When making wall cabinets, plain doors waste a lot of space.
I know it's just semantics, but that statement doesn't really make sense, at least to me. While building small-item storage into the doors is a neat idea, you haven't really saved any space have you?
The front of your 3-6" deep doors are just as thick as your plain doors, so the 3-6" had to be subtracted from or added to the orignal depth of the cabinet, right?
Granted, having the small items stored in the door makes them easily accessible and probably more organized, so I do like the idea.
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"DerbyDad03" wrote: (clip)While building small-item storage into the doors is a neat idea, you haven't really saved any space have you? (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Would you be happier if he had said he was creating more "frontage?" :-)
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Hmmm. Unless you store the items in the Twilight Zone, they will always use some space. Just depends on whether its wasted space, or whether it will get in the way of other things.
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In my own case I made the cabinet doors 6 inches deep in addition to the cabinet 12 inches deep. The dimensions came from the sizes of some scrap wood I had. Yeah it sticks out more into the workshop, but its over a kitchen-style workbench against the wall so it doesn't really consume any usable space anyway. The doors were fairly rigid, but still sag under the weight, so I added a couple of ledgers at the bottom, that support the doors when they are closed. Ball bearing hinges were the best part of the design though. I would definately recommend them.
.
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How do you hinge the doors so that they will open without fouling on the adjacent cabinets?
Mark Rand RTFM
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Mark Rand wrote:

Obviously at the TOP. :-) ...lew...
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Lew Hartswick wrote:

Makes it difficult to store things on the doors though. You'd need to hang them so that they pivot from the front or else put some space between the cabinets.
--
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--John
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wrote:

I just listed a bunch of things with a 0.01 starting price. Besides that, any racks also help.
i
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Acro Bins and wall plates. You can get these for cheap from Global Industrial Supply. The wall plates are simple perforated steel sheets that the bins hang from. You can make a lot of storage area in a small space. Anything you can put on the wall is a space saving deal.
Our work shop is a 16' x 26' partition of another area. In it, we have a 12' x 16' caged area that has a milling machine, a 8' Lista cabinet with overhead cabinets, 2 - 3'w x 8' roll-around stand-up parts cabinets, a 5'w roll around Lista parts cabinet, a stationary Lista mill tooling cabinet, a 3' bolt/nut/screw cabinet, a laptop roll around cart, and every free space of wall to a height of 7' has the acro bins and wall plates with all of the pneumatic fittings and other odds and ends, even the area between the big Lista bench top and the upper cabinets is full of mounted acro bins. Outside of the caged area is where we do machine building, and this area currently has a new full-sized 3 axis CNC VMC we are automating, a 6 axis robot, a 6' lista work bench, a ladder/work platform storage area, an automatic parts washer and 5 roll-away tool boxes. And we still have room to work. Even the caged wall is used for storage, we attached extrusion to it, and use it to store completed sub- assemblies, hoses, cables, tools, paperwork racks, aluminum stock, etc. Keeping the floor clean and uncluttered is a key. Having hose and power reels mounted high on the wall/ceiling is important for uncluttering.
--
Anthony

You can't 'idiot proof' anything....every time you try, they just make
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Anthony wrote:

I had an old rack for 9 track computer tapes sitting around, so I made a rolling base for it, then I covered one side with 1/4" hardboard, and the Harbor Freight version of those bins. That left the other side open, which was filled with the old metal framed AkroMills 50 drawer parts cabinets. Small parts on one side, bigger stuff on the other! Not only can it turn, but it can be rolled almost anywhere in the shop to keep things close at hand.
It is similar to the open rack shown here: http://www.online-computer.com /
I have made storage cabinets out of old relay racks with locking doors, as well. I store the expensive tools and test equipment in them. They are all on heavy casters, and can be moved, if needed.
--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
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You only need working space for the tool that you are working with. Put as much equipment around the perimeter of the room and put all heavy machinery on mobile bases.
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The mobile bases should be storage cabinets for heavy stuff so the machine isn't top-heavy.
Several of my machines are mounted on opposite sides of flip-top tables if they might be used alternately on the same job; planer + jointer, 8" table saw + belt sander, sheet metal shear + corner notcher. The base cabinet contains all tools and accessories.
On the lighter machine stands the casters are on narrow hinged boards which can be flipped out with a toe to put the machine solidly on the floor. It works better if each board has one swivel and one fixed caster, aligned such that it doesn't roll away when you lift each side to flip the board.
jw
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Assuming you have a smooth flat floor.
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...put all heavy machinery on mobile bases.

If not, just use bigger castors. I usually work outdoors with the machines on a sloping, uneven asphalt driveway or the flatter ground beside it. Any machine that requires side forces like a table saw has retractable landing gear (see other post) and I kick shims under it to stop wobble. The 4X6 bandsaw is on lawnmower wheels. I put rubber door stop wedges under the casters to keep the welders from rolling and let the heavier sheet metal machine stand rest against the tailgate of the pickup truck.
jw
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Relatively smooth, no make that as long as the dips and small holes are not more than 1/4" deep. My garage floor is far from flat or smooth.
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My garage floor is all pitched towards a drain, so I cant get anything leveled without support block. In my 10x18 garage I have 2 toolboxes , two 4 drawer boxes, 36x18 shelves, 2 side cabinets, Radial arm saw, table saw, 30x72 workbench, 36x18 metal cabinet, 17" drill press, 20" scroll saw, 11 drawers (that was for workbenches) stacked on top of each other and 2 small tool carts, 28' ladder, and I can still fit my car in. What I did for the bench was made it pivot between 2 4x4's that go from ceiling to floor (with pegboard in between the two 4x4's), when in use I prop it up with a 2x3, if I need to move it, the legs and supports get wing nutted on. I had to figure out what to do with the radial arm saw or table saw since one of them would get in the way of the car to park in there, so what I figured out was the table saw without legs was 13" tall so I thought why not make that pivot to. Yes its a bit heavy to get propping up and to let it hang when not in use, but its working out great for me, the stand can get bolted on easily when I need to move it out. 4x8 sheets are behind the 2 tool boxes and radial arm saw. I have the garage pretty much well packed, even wood hanging from the ceiling. You just need a creative thinking cap.

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On Sun, 9 Sep 2007 22:46:13 -0400, "noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote:>My garage floor is all pitched towards a drain, so I cant get anything

Shrug...my "shop is a partially closed in 14x54 carport with a dirt floor and a 24" slope from end to end.
With the exception of the HLV-H and the Gorton MasterMill..everything else is on 2x4s or 4x4s with shims.
Gunner

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