Re: Poll: Workbench: Upper & Lower Stretchers or Lower Stretchers Only

Go with both and build in drawers and perhaps a shelf or two. AND, you can put a tool tray under the bench top IF you leave enough room. More enclosed storage space along with more weight certainly can't hurt. The internal parts will also firm up the base quite a bit.
I'm about 6 months - elapsed time - ahead of you on building a real work bench - finally. You are going to go with through mortise and tenon joints on the stretchers/legs connections right?
You're going to enjoy making this bench I'm sure. Most of it going to be jummy wood?
charlie b
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:-) :-) :-) :-) :-)
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wrote in message:

Jums,
here's some Aussie Jummywood going into a "basher bench" at the moment. Facing and vises still to be fitted. Trim has been installed but is not in photo.
http://woodworking.homeip.net/wood/temp/6.jpg
(other pics 1-7)
Greg
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wrote:

Hell yes. Particle board and pine is what built the house of Ikea! :)
I love picture number 5:
http://woodworking.homeip.net/wood/temp/5.jpg
Let's see now: Spring clamps--- check. Various nuts 'n' bolts--- check. Bins of assorted screws and other odds 'n' ends--- check. Metal ruler, scissors, wire brushes, "box cutter" knife--- check. Varnish, (in manly "I'm a real woodworker" mason jar)--- check. Case of Jacod's Creek Chardonnay-- check.
Jacod's Creek Chardonnay. Love it. No shop should be without it. :)
Ok everybody, fess up. I can't be the only one who spends at least as much time looking at the periphery of the photos that get submitted around here as I do the object intended to be gloated over.... Can I?
Michael Baglio Chapel Hill
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wrote:

I reckon it'd been as impressive as the bench if it had been "bin 444" ! ;O)
Those Jacobs kids are something else aren't they? Talk about versatile; wine, cream crackers, and those drill chucks!! Sheesh, what a talented family! ;O)
Take Care, Gnube {too thick for linux}
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snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.net (Tom Bergman) wrote in message

I used single lower/middle stretchers and double rails on mine. All joints were pinned m&t. I added an open tool shelf as an afterthought.
Solid as can be, with no sign of racking or any sort of movement, and I use it regularly for mostly handtool work (scrubbing, surfacing, mortising, etc.).
You can see it at:
http://www.swt.edu/~cv01/bench04.jpg
Chuck Vance
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That's a very nice bench. It looks like SYP except for the leg vise portion. Can you elaborate as to type of wood and finish you used?
Don

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It's SYP for the top, legs, rails and stretchers. The leg vise is made of a dense, close-grained pine from Mexico that my wood-monger called "guato pine". It's good stuff and amazingly durable for pine.
You can get a better idea of what the stuff looks like up close at:
http://www.swt.edu/~cv01/repisa.gif
It also can have a bit of figure to it:
http://www.swt.edu/~cv01/stool2.jpg
The bench legs, rails and stretchers are finished with blonde Paddylac(tm). The top was done with a coat of 50/50 BLO and turps flooded on, followed by three or four more coats increasing the ratio of oil to turps until the last coat was pure BLO. (One coat per day.) I then topped it off with a couple of coats of Tried and True's beeswax/oil mix. That gave just enough slickness so you can get glue and such off easily, but not so much that things would slide around.
Chuck Vance
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It's SYP for the top, legs, rails and stretchers. The leg vise is made of a dense, close-grained pine from Mexico that my wood-monger called "guato pine". It's good stuff and amazingly durable for pine.
You can get a better idea of what the stuff looks like up close at:
http://www.swt.edu/~cv01/repisa.gif
It also can have a bit of figure to it:
http://www.swt.edu/~cv01/stool2.jpg
The bench legs, rails and stretchers are finished with blonde Paddylac(tm). The top was done with a coat of 50/50 BLO and turps flooded on, followed by three or four more coats increasing the ratio of oil to turps until the last coat was pure BLO. (One coat per day.) I then topped it off with a couple of coats of Tried and True's beeswax/oil mix. That gave just enough slickness so you can get glue and such off easily, but not so much that things would slide around.
Chuck Vance
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Just used lower ones . It never seems to move at all . picture on web page...
-- mike hide http://members.tripod.com/mikehide2

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Actually no, there's a chance I'll need to relocate and I want a bench that is movable. So stub tenons with the 1/2" bench bolts sold by Lee Valley so I can break it down if necessary.

Although I've lurked here quite a while, I'm not positive on jummy wood, always assumed it was pine. If so, no, the top will be hard maple, the base most likely either soft maple or poplar. Depends on prices at the mill when I pick up the lumber.
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