Re: Old Codgers Only - SubTitle: Trifocals in the shop

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Norman D. Crow wrote: [snip]> Didn't we all have this conversation a few months back?

That's called "bifocal lock". I finally bought a pair of glasses ground to my bifocal prescription. They work great. I leave them next to the computer.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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Computer glasses are great. Get a single power. you may be able to pick a suitable pair from the local drugstore. Just be sure that you are checking them for the proper distance. I got my computer glasses through an optomitrist as the needed power is greater than the drugstore glasses.
Dick

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I think that you are confusing two things. There are tri-focal lenses that are split into three zones. There are progressive lenses that have no noticable division between the focal areas. Some people adapt to progressive lenses and many others find them very difficult. The progressive lenses have a continuous variation in power. The effect is that there is a very narrow range of suitable power for any viewing distance but there is some optimal power for every distance.
Dick

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That's why I come in here...so I can feel young.
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Well I can certainly relate to the distortion problem that you mention. I have tri-focal safety glasses and progressive glasses for non work activities. Both have drawbacks when you are performing precision alignment activities such as operating a hand electric drill.
Try buying reading glasses, full size (not half glasses) with the magnification that you require for a particular purpose. Wear one or the other around your neck and change between the two as necessary. You will not have the alignment issues with magnification only lenses. Just don't forget to remove the magnifiers before you walk away and let the floor come up and meet you.
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STOVEBOLT wrote:

I do use these for the closeups - the scattered all over syndrome - and they do help. It's actually when I don't have any spec's that causes the most interesting results :-(
I am becoming accustomed to the effects and am really thankful that most of the distortion is not obvious when I do any cuts or similar with single focus glasses.
...and to ease the fears of others it doesn't seem to affect longer range viewing like when driving. I only see the one lane (or as applicable) and going in the same general direction. :-)
Ed
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lay
<snipped> I have worn glasses since 17... now 57. Went through bi-focal, no problem adapting. Went to tri focal a bunch of years ago, no problem adapting. My eye guy talked me into trying progressive lenses (ultimately from two different Mfg.s) wore each about a month... MAJOR problems! First I had to become like a "bobble head" moving my head while reading, etc., not just my eyes. Next it seems that style of lens induced astigmatism, which normally is not one of my visual defects. I finally went to the "Ray-Ban aviator" shape lens, with fixed segments for the three distance ranges and I have zero problems (and they are polycarbonate for safety) except the usual... sweat dripping on them while I'm looking downward. All said and done, I like my "lines", they provide a fixed reference point and cause no difficulty... and in this shape and size of lens allow for adequate latitude of horizontal and vertical range within each segment to allow for a more normal movement of eyes only. YMMV Tom
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"Bill Daly" wrote in message

I
ROTFL ... "my head "reformatted"?? ... does that get rid of the FAT at the same time?
.... a great concept, BTW, and thanks for the reassurance. :)
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"Mike Marlow"wrote in message

learn
Yep ... I tried that, in the dark, this morning ... almost exciting as that first parachute jump.

big
That is what I noticed first, and sorry to hear that it might not change with use. I'll give them a couple of weeks and see how it goes. Sounds like everything else in life, from a choice of wife to the color of your car ... everyone is different.
Thanks for the perspective, Mike.
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"Bob Krecak" wrote in message

at
use
it
glasses
It does .... I've moved the computer screen further back and that seems to have helped, along with Edwin's suggestion about actual position of the lenses in front of the eyes. I'll be glad if I can forget about them at some point ... the older I get the less I like any kind of change.
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A couple years ago, during an eye exam, my doctor told me about double D's that he had made for a few folks in one of the trades, cant' remember which one. I have used them in the shop and think they're great. What they are is a bifocal, which is like a letter D, with another D on the top and the space between the straight parts of both D's is for normal distance. These are large lens safety glasses. They save a lot of crooking of the neck when trying to line things up or setting blade/bit height.
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I wouldn't put up with them for more than a week if you don't seem to be getting used to them. My eye-doc told me some folks have trouble with them and to come back if I had problems. I "kind of" got used to mine and wore them for a couple of years; but the reading field was very narrow, like yours. After a couple of years it was time for new ones I told them I wanted to go back to regular bifocals. I was told they could grind an adaptation of my old lens and if I didn't like them after a week or two they would give me bi's. The new grinds are MUCH BETTER.
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One more on "progressive lenses."
I wear trifocals and am very happy with them. I tried the progressive and found that every straight line had a bow. I learned to put up with it for one set of glasses, but for the next one went to the "old fashioned" lined lenses. I'm much happier with them. Age 67.
Some things I learned:
If you flood the surface with light, your pupil closes down, and the image gets sharper because the there is greater depth of the focused field. Remember back in the days when you SET the camera, how f2.8 (wide open) would give you a lot of fuzzy and f16 (pretty small) would put everything in focus? Works for the eye too. I went out a bought a lot of lights for my shop. Frequently my focus problem was a light problem.
When I bought my glasses, I had a second set of lenses ground, for not very much, from safety glass material, put in sturdy frames. They are not actual safety glasses, but put more material between my eyes and whatevers happening that shouldn't be.
I bought a set of "cheap reading glasses" for project work, where I needed to see up close out of the TOP of the lens. They are very dizzymaking when I walk with them, but they save a lot of neck craning.
When I taught computers, I had my trifocals made with a larger mid distance piece, set for the distance that I was at standing behind a student. With the regular grind, I had to get my head so close to the screen I was worried about being sued for sexual harassment.
Walt C
"
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I actually went the other way around. Had lined bifocals first (cause I'm cheap). Couldn't stand the parallax distortion. Switched to lineless, no problems since.
I'd actually asked a number of cow-orkers, and I think the split was about 50-50 betweened lined and lineless, among folks who'd used both. It seems like it's a real personal sort of thing, rather that what you first use. (YMMV, of course).
Regards,
JT (Check with your insurance; in my case, they charge for lineless; however, when I opted for lined, I had something like 30 days, then I could go back, and they'd re-do the lenses for only the difference in price between the two. It made the decision really easy -- opt for cheap first, and when that didn't work, pony up the few extra bucks for lineless).
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"John Thomas" wrote in message

Anyone who would ork a cow simply can't be trusted.
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Tue, Apr 26, 2005, 11:26am (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Swingman) laments: Here lately (fast approaching 62) <snip>
I just dropped by to post, and this thread popped up. So, I thought I'd see what you old guys were up to. Then I read this. Damn, I'm 64, and I don't even consider myself middle-aged yet, let alone old. You must be spending too much time thinking about it. Just ignore it, it won't go away, but it won't bother you. That's what I do. But, if you're having problems keeping track of your glasses, don't let 'em go when you take 'em off. Hold 'em with your little finger, put 'em in your shirt pocket, slide 'em in the gap between two buttons of your shirt, or in the neck of your shirt. Then no prob. Or you could choose the sissy route, and get one of those thingies that hook on your glasses frame and loop behind your neck. I use a magnifrying (sic) glass, or loupe, at times.
JOAT A highbrow is a person educated beyond his intelligence. - Brander Matthews
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On Tue, 26 Apr 2005 11:26:04 -0500, Swingman wrote in rec.woodworking:

Since you're approaching 62, I guess I have 5 more years of experience than you do.
I did a lot of computer work wearing bifocals, and finally bought glasses with my reading (bottom half) prescription all over. That works fine with a computer screen. The difference in my two corrections is small enough that I can also do shop work and such without too much problem. I also have two pair of those really cheap magnifying glasses. I can't remember the actual diopter numbers of those, but the ones I used for working on things like circuit boards really get the ol' nose down in there. I can't use those for more than a few seconds at a time, and dasn't walk across the room with them. The other pair is weaker, and can usually be found near the router table downstairs. I've gotten pretty good at swapping glasses without losing the idle pair. Not too often, that is...
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One of the good things about modern times: if you die horribly on
television, you will not have died in vain. You will have entertained
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We discussed tri/bi/quad/ focals, how about lens coatings and treatments?
I have the type that darkens in the sun. I hesitated getting them for years because I was afraid they would stay too dark. Now I won't go without them. No more clip ons or second prescription sun glasses to carry and change.
Anti-glare is also good. With the self darkening lenses you can't have anti-glare on the outside, but it helps even on the inside. Ed
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The first auto-darkening lense I got didn't work for crap. The last couple have been *wonderful*. I'm not sure what the difference is/was - the first set may have been glass, with the 'darkener' incoporated into the lens.
I know the last two have been physical coatings on plastic. I won't have glasses without this.
And also second the anti-glare. I just got this (it's by Zeiss) on the latest pair, and I won't live without this, either. Much less specular highlights from point-sources at night. Waaaaaaay better.
Caveat about the self-darkener -- won't help you in a car; however it works, it's apparently UV activated; I think the car windhields must have some sort of UV coating.
Regards, JT
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On Thu, 28 Apr 2005 22:20:32 +0000 (UTC), John Thomas

I've not been impressed with the difference with anti-glare coatings - in fact on the last pair I got supposedly coated they left it off the order and I never noticed until I had them back for adjusting and the tech. commented on it. The anti-scratch coating seems more useful to me - and they wouldn't do both.

Rumor is that there is a new type of self-darkening lens that reacts to visible light rather than UV. (car windows are UV blockers to reduce fading of the upholstery.) I'm going to check into that when I get my new glasses this summer.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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