Raised Panel Curved Cabinet Doors

I'd like to steam bend some solid cherry panels, approximately 23"H X 30"W, the bend/arc to be perpendicular to the grain and the complete curve to be 90 degrees.... for making 2 curved cabinet doors at the corner of the cabinet. I suspect this sort of bending may not be sucessful. Has anyone tried this and what may be the best technique, in anything special? Actually, I suspect steaming is not the way to go.
I suppose my alternative is to glue up and laminate the stock, to make the rough curve and thicker stock (along the seams), then carve/sand down to the appropriate curve/contour.
I think I need to be successful with the curve/bend aspect of the panel, first, before I can address the raised panel aspect.
I've never attempted curved doors, so I don't know if either of these approaches is best/appropriate. Any assistance would be appreciated.
I've checked out these 2 sites, so for, but I think I need more "schooling" for my particular doors. http://www.miterclamp.com/radius/pages/Radiuscabinetphotoessay.htm http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Curved_cabinet_doors.html
Sonny
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Thin pieces would be the best, especially if you expect it to hold any of the shape after completion. The glue keeps it's shape.
----------------- "Sonny" wrote in message
I'd like to steam bend some solid cherry panels, approximately 23"H X 30"W, the bend/arc to be perpendicular to the grain and the complete curve to be 90 degrees.... for making 2 curved cabinet doors at the corner of the cabinet. I suspect this sort of bending may not be sucessful. Has anyone tried this and what may be the best technique, in anything special? Actually, I suspect steaming is not the way to go.
I suppose my alternative is to glue up and laminate the stock, to make the rough curve and thicker stock (along the seams), then carve/sand down to the appropriate curve/contour.
I think I need to be successful with the curve/bend aspect of the panel, first, before I can address the raised panel aspect.
I've never attempted curved doors, so I don't know if either of these approaches is best/appropriate. Any assistance would be appreciated.
I've checked out these 2 sites, so for, but I think I need more "schooling" for my particular doors. http://www.miterclamp.com/radius/pages/Radiuscabinetphotoessay.htm http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Curved_cabinet_doors.html
Sonny
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On 5/3/2011 10:49 AM, Sonny wrote:

...
Well, if you were talking orienting grain other way, coopering would be the way if you're adamant on being solid stock.
For horizontal grain w/ that much bend your only real alternative is laminated. In reality, that's what veneers are for.
Oh, the raised panel thing...you're hosed other than laminating I think and that'll leave glue lines showing; how prominent they'll be will depend on how well you can match the grain and the finish.
Cherry doesn't bend well; the laminations will have to be quite thin I'd expect; I've never tried the trick your asking about so don't have any data on just what you'd be able to get away with but it won't be very thick I'm thinking...
How much of a raised panel do you think you're going to want here? How thick is the final piece going to be you think?
My gut feeling is I'd rethink the idea... :)
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Make sure to post here if you actually pull this off. Very ambitious and difficult. Would love to know if it is possible with reasonable effort and results.

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I started this project last year, so I have the carcass partially done. I do have old pics, but will get new ones, with close-ups of the curve area. I'll post them this afternoon.
I have maybe 250 bd ft of air dried rough cut and 1400 bd ft of kiln dried cherry to work with, so I have some wood to experiment with.
The results may end up being "reasonable" for me. LOL. The project is ambitious for me, too, but I'm definitely learning more than I've previously known.
This is my inspiration piece: http://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/4035792138/in/photostream
Last year's pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/5684520028/in/photostream This is a curved corner/end: http://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/5684509922/in/photostream
Sonny
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On 5/3/2011 12:36 PM, Sonny wrote: ...
...
I think the grain will look wrong if you run it horizontal in the doors if you're making that piece (not to mention the added difficulty).
Run the grain direction vertical and cooper the stock for a solid door panel. Not only will it be much easier, it will be more stable and you'll not have to worry about either laminations failing or creeping or similar problems w/ grain failure trying to bend lengthwise grain.
$0.02, etc., ... :)
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Cherry tambour? Like an appliance garage on its side?
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Pooh Yie! That's too expensive! Besides, I don't want a beadboard look. I want a raised panel look. Maybe some tambour for the next project.
Cherry Tambour 96" x 24" 1/4" x 96" Long x 24" Wide 24" Solid Cherry Slats Part# T-CT24-96 Shipping weight 48 lbs Price $499.99

panel.
For sure, the grain will be vertical. The curve will be perpendicular to the grain.
Sonny
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Nooo... make your own!
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On 5/3/2011 6:16 PM, Sonny wrote: ...

...
Oh, ok, I misunderstood or miscomprehended one... :)
Coopering is the way to go as another said...w/ cherry I'd opt for laminating the upper/lower rail pieces.
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SonomaProducts.com wrote:

doors.http://www.miterclamp.com/radius/pages/Radiuscabinetphotoessay.htmhttp://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Curved_cabinet_doors.html
It is possible but very time consuming , soaking and steaming several times over several weeks keeping constant pressure , your far better off useing ply or laminating it up then veneering it .
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On Tuesday, May 3, 2011 8:49:04 AM UTC-7, Sonny wrote:

As others have said, glueing up a curve then shaping it to a panel is more likely to succeed in dry cherry wood.
I've seen some lovely doors done this way, in the Rotunda at U. of Virginia; Thomas Jefferson made oval rooms inside the round building, and the doors actually match the wall curvature. Alas, I don't know the wood in those, or how it was worked.
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Sonny wrote:

Just saw such a door made on "How it's Made" yesterday. The coopered the panel and used a custom laminated and curved piece for the top and bottom rails.
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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On 5/3/2011 2:19 PM, Gerald Ross wrote: ...

But the panel grain was parallel to the curve, right? Sonny thinks (iiuc) he wants to run the grain the other way. (As noted, I think the aesthetics are wrong in that case as well as the pita construction, but hey, it ain't my piece.... :) )
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