Radial Arm Saw

Page 1 of 2  
Can someone give me some insite on a RAS from J. D. Wallace & Co (circa 1940"s) out of Chicago, IL. Its still in pretty good condition But I don't know if the motor works because the wiring is shot. Just wondering if its worth the expence to fix and the availiability of parts. Any info is good info---thanks for your time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

http://www.owwm.com/MfgIndex/Detail.asp?ID 9#Profile
JD Wallace has been gone for a long time...roughly around WWII era. Parts will be essentially non-existant. If you can't test it and/or return it if not satisfactory, I wouldn't give much at all for it (like ask them for $10 to dispose of it for them). If it's external wiring only that appears to be the problem, it's possible it might still be operational. Bearings should be possible to tell if their in decent shape or not, if the motor has been burnt out that may be discernible, maybe not...
Overall, you might get lucky, then again it's a long shot...but I'm guessing you knew that... :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Duane Bozarth wrote:

Actually as a brand name they lasted a wee bit longer than that. Somewhere along the line they were bought or the machine line was bought by Indiana Machinery & Foundry Supply. In fact the saw below looks an awful lot like the Wallace.
http://www.owwm.com/MfgIndex/image.asp?id )9
When it all went kaflooie I don't know.
UA100
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Unisaw A100 wrote:

That image is labelled as a 1945 vintage machine which is <about> WWII era... :)
I couldn't find anything even mentioned for them past early 50's (and absolutely nothing of any real use) so didn't count that as being significant for OP's purposes...
I don't think it'll help him any if he decides to bite on the RAS, iow... :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Steve B" wrote:

------------------------------------------------------------- The Wood Manufacturing Technology program at Cerritos College here in SoCal has an old radial arm saw that they keep around just to show how dangerous the beast can be.
The only thing they use it for is to cross cut rough stock to rough length before proceding with finishing blanks to size.
IMHO, I'd cut it up and throw it in the dump, before I hurt myself.
<Flame suit on>
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Lew Hodgett" wrote:

---------------------------------------------------- For the record, it's a 12" unit that has a many years on it.
The fact they only have one unit and it is restricted to cross cutting rough stock to rough length as the first step to size rough cut stock to size should tell you something.
BTW, they have at least 10, 10" table saws including Unisaw, General and PM 66.
All of these saws were swapped out for Saw Stop units 2 years ago.
As you might expect, safety is of prime concern.
The college has deep pockets and wants to keep them full of cash, not lawsuits.
IMHO, the RAS is a beast that has outlived it's usefulness.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 15 Oct 2012 17:18:07 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

All give you about 50% on that answer. I've been using one since the late 70's. I'll agree with use as far as ripping boards, I did it once and that was time to buy a tablesaw. You can mount a chuck on it and use it for horizontal drilling or put a router bit in and use it on soft wood as a pin router. Only 3450 RPM. Great for Dado's and many other cuts. Also there are molding heads available. Since I got the unisaw with the sliding table uses have diminished but as long as I've got the floor space every now and then it's handy,
Mike M
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Lew Hodgett" wrote:

---------------------------------------------------- For the record, it's a 12" unit that has a many years on it.
The fact they only have one unit and it is restricted to cross cutting rough stock to rough length as the first step to size rough cut stock to size should tell you something.
...
A) I really don't believe the reason given above has much at all to do w/ it still being there.
B) It tells me they understand where it excels and have far less length of time spent in starting new projects from rough, large stock than in the later fabrication stages. That somehow doesn't seem hard to imagine.
It also indicates they don't do a lot of really large, architectural-style or framing work. Somehow I'm not surprised by that, either.
C) You're entitled to your opinion of course and for your purposes it may be right. I've an almost ancient 16" and I'll never part with it. It again isn't the most used tool but it's invaluable when needed and nothing else takes its place.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
" Lew Hodgett" wrote:

---------------------------------------------------- "dpb" wrote:

----------------------------------------- OK. ------------------------------------------
-------------------------------------------- ALL projects start with the development of a rough stock list.
The ONLY function of the RAS is to cross cut rough stock to length. ------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------- I guess "Large" is open to some interpretation. ----------------------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------- In a modern facility such as the one WMT provides, that RAS stands out as one of the "Last of the Mohicans".
It provides no function that can't be accomplished by other means.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/16/2012 2:19 AM, Lew Hodgett wrote: ...

Indeed, but "far less length of time [is] spent" roughing out than is required in the rest of the milling operations. Ergo, it doesn't take nearly as many machines to provide the needed capacity.
It doesn't follow that it is any less important a portion of the work, however, only that that portion can be accomplished in a (relatively) short span.

Indeed, but if were handling 12-, 16-quarter material of 8" and wider and 10-plus feet long as a piece of work, the TS would find as little application as the RAS does now.

See above--for large material that is essentially impossible to move across a TS it is invaluable as well as for the routine crosscut.
Once one gets something down to a manageable size, then the TS can handle it, certainly.
Or, of course, if one is comfortable w/ the RAS, it can do what the TS can w/ very few exceptions and some things that conversely cannot be done at all conveniently w/ a TS. OTOH, most folks now w/ the advent of the large router do many of those that way or large shops have other dedicated machines...
Again, if you don't like it, fine...I'll be retaining mine anyways. :)
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

--------------------------------------------- "dpb" wrote:

---------------------------------------------------------- Working with that size stock on a production basis would be done with power feed equipment, not manual feed as provided with a RAS.
For the home hobbyist, there are other ways including but not limited to a band saw. ---------------------------------------------------------- C) You're entitled to your opinion of course and for your purposes it may be right. I've an almost ancient 16" and I'll never part with it. It again isn't the most used tool but it's invaluable when needed and nothing else takes its place. --------------------------------------- Sentimental value is tough to define.
As an add on piece of equipment for the typical hobbyist or even a small one man shop, a RAS just doesn't cut it IMHO.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/16/2012 11:50 AM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Maybe, maybe not. I've seen both and I have had power feeder on mine on occasion ripping heavy stock...and can still move it form the shaper over there if the need arose.

Well, you weren't talking home hobbyist above, certainly...and how do you propose moving the material through the bandsaw any better than across a TS and what's the odds the home hobbyist has the BS that could handle it, anyway?

Nonsense. It has a definite advantage and does things 10" TS simply can't hack (the blade depth won't even do a standard 4x4, for heaven's sake w/o flipping the stock) not to mention again trying to cross cut long stock on a TS is far more dangerous and aggravating than a RAS ever thought of being.

Again, speak for yourself. IM(NS)HO if one deals w/ sizable stuff on any frequency at all and has the room it's well worth having around. As for the shop, it all depends on the type of work a shop does routinely.
And, for the individual, it's always the possibility as the one-piece does it all tool for a constrained size/budget. As at least one other noted here, that's the way I began lo! those many years ago and did quite a lot of work (some even pretty respectable after a few years :) ) with it long before ever had a TS. The TS was the one that I could do without.
It helps, of course, to have the room for the 16" behemoth but there's still the old DeWalt 10" of Dad's around that could handle quite a lot of the size of thing the normal wooddorker would expect to see very nicely...I could part with it but I'll never part w/ the large one.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If the user intends to rip with it, I agree on getting rid of it. If cross cutting and mitering is the only use, it is worth its weight to keep around.
--
Jim in NC


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/11/12 10:55 PM, Steve B wrote:

First thing you want to do is google radial arm saw recall. Type in your serial number. If it's a match, you'll be sent a new blade guard and table that will make the thing much more safe to operate. If your serial number doesn't match, put it in the dumpster while you still have a hand. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/11/2012 11:54 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

If the serial number does not match for them to send you the New Table and blade guard, they will offer to buy the beast, or at least the motor and carriage. They will send you the box to put it in, pay to come back to them and then when they confirm the serial number, they will pay you $100. I gave them my old one,a Craftsman, Got the $100 and bought a Table Saw. More people have lost fingers and hands with any of those old radial arm saws.
But if you really want to keep it, I have a book like manual that tells how to set it up, and how to do all sort of cuts and projects with it. If you would like a copy, email me at snipped-for-privacy@barr-family.com asking for the copy, and I will scan a copy for you.
Jack
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/11/2012 10:55 PM, Steve B wrote:

...
The RAS seems to bring out the critics here but imo they've mostly bought into fear-mongering instead of real issues...
Yes, a RAS can cause an injury if you put yourself in the path of the blade--otoh, if you put yourself in the path of the blade or a potential missile from a TS, surprise--the same thing can happen.
A RAS is particularly good for cutoff work of long material that is difficult or impossible on a TS; set up in a bench correctly they can also rip and miter and at compound angles sometimes more easily than a TS as well. Since the blade moves instead of the work except for ripping, it makes handling larger work less effort. For crosscuts there is the limitation of the length of arm that can be a disadvantage.
The only real problem is that one does need to learn to use one w/ some practice--it is possible to let the head get ahead of itself if one doesn't control the feed rate well as the proper crosscut is to start w/ the blade behind the fence and then move towards you to make the cut. As another noted, proper blade design helps here.
As for whether to keep this particular saw or not--depends. :) Some of the small Craftsman particularly vintage were built pretty well and are adequate machines; unfortunately there were quite a number that also used light round tubing that owing to the lack of heft are not very rigid and are, for that reason, nearly impossible to set up and keep in alignment and aren't really worth fooling with.
I'm spoiled as have an old Rockwell 16" beast built into a long bench--it doesn't get the most use but I'd surely not even consider parting with it...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B wrote:

The first stationary power tool I had was a Craftsman RAS. Bought it about 20 years ago, still have and use it.
I've never had it grab a piece of wood and shoot it. Not if it is used properly; i.e., wood against the fence, saw pulled forward (not pushed back as my dumbass former father in law was wont to do). It *can* try to climb up on the wood; that is mitigated by using a negative rake saw tooth (and by keeping your arm stiff).
They are good for crosscutting. They are good for that because you can see exactly where they are going to cut. Any saw blade I have ever had has one tooth that sticks out slightly more at the side than the other teeth (two sides = two teeth). I find and mark those teeth and line it up with where I want to cut.
If you want to make a half lap in a long piece of wood, it is easy on the RAS, PITA on a table saw. In fact, *any* crosscuting of long pieces is easier on a RAS. How easy is it to whack off a foot from an 8' x 2" x 10" piece of white oak is it on a TS? NP with a RAS.
You can crosscut wider than with a miter saw. If the RAS is set up well, you can crosscut double the arm travel by making one cut halfway across, flipping the board over and then cutting the other half. _________________
You can rip with them too but that is better done on a table saw...the table saw is meant for ripping. If you rip with it, there are two possible ways: One is called "in" ripping, the other "out" ripping. That refers to the direction in which the head is turned and in which the wood is pushed. Note that in both, the wood is fed into the blade *opposite* to that when crosscutting. Attention needs to be paid to setting the anti-kickback pawls properly too. People seem to tremble in fear when someone mentions ripping with a RAS; I suspect that may be because they didn't have it set up properly for ripping. ______________
The biggest nuisance with a RAS is getting it set up properly. There are numerous things that need to be done; all are explained in the manual so if you don't have one, get it. Once set up it works fine but if you turn, tilt or do anything else to the head things can get out of whack easier than with a TS.
IMO and IME, they are handy. I'd keep it.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B wrote:

One significant plus for a RAS is its accuracy, which really comes into play with cabinetry and the like.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/12/2012 11:42 AM, HeyBub wrote: ...

_ONLY_ if it is solid enough to be so...unfortunately, many of the low-priced Craftsman and the ilk aren't...whether OP's is or not is indeterminate w/o knowledge of specifics of model.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yep, a lot of the cheaper saws will cut accurately, if you do lots of setup and babysitting. And if you get it zeroed in, it can lose its setting very quickly.
Another factor I if it is accurate to begin with. Case in point, I borrowed the use of a RAS at a friend's house. It was dead on, total accurate 90 degrees. I cut some dadoes. I tried to test fit some pieces and found out that the dadoes were not consistently the same depth from front to back. I figured out that the dado actually curved up the further it got into the board. I pointed it out to my friend.
He apparently cut some aluminum on the saw and got a couple pieces in there that were much harder than the other stock. This bent the arm up. It did cutoffs just fine. The dadoes were what was screwed up.
Any time you use a RAS, always check for accuracy. The difference in the quality between various RAS becomes quite apparent very quickly.
Having said that, I have used a number of RAS that were just fine and did a consistently, accurate job.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.