Queen Anne Table Question

I'm building the queen anne table available from plansnow (Woodsmith #43) and the directions call for aprons to be 13/16" wide. Is this a common thickness? Would it be better to plane the stock to 3/4"? Does it matter?
Thanks, Tom Wojeck
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Tom Wojeck wrote:

I'm confused. 13/16" wide is not a thickness dimension. Do you mean thickness? I can't see the detail in the picture, but I'd be hesitant to mill off an extra 1/16" and find I really need it for some reason. It is tough adding it back on.
Does anything get attached to it? Any slots routed in it that could possibly make 3/4" very thin at the slot?
Ed
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Ed,
Thanks for your reply.
I really miswrote the message. I'm still a rookie and sometimes say the wrong things. It's not width I was referring to it's thickness.
The plan calls for the ends to be milled into tenons to fit into the table legs. The tenons are 1/4" thick.
However, I agree with you. If the plan says 13/16", then that's what I'll make it.
--Tom

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Tom thats probably what the lumberyard is selling as 3/4 stock surfaced .
Used to be if you bought 3/4" stock rough sawn it was always cut 1/8" heavy [7/8"] so that it would clean up a full 3/4". Seems now the deal is if you buy 3/4" stock surfaced, instead if a full 3/4" you get 13/16". In effect it allows the dealer to start with thinner rough stock and thus makes a little more cash for surfaced stock and rook you out of 1/16"of material. If you question the dealer then the excuse will probably be that it is a "shrinkage allowance", the truth is they are advertizing 3/4" stock and selling something less, which to me at least should be illegal.
In short do it right, mill it to 3/4"thats my suggestion.....mjh
--



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wrote:

Uhhhh, excuse me a second... 13/16 is *more* than 3/4. (3/4 = 12/16)
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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Hey now is not the time for logic. !!! :) what I really ment was advertised 4 quarter stock is being sold as surfaced 13/16".
I just checked my handy rule and by God you are right of course....mjh
wrote:

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In
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material.
Miss America?
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Tom Wojeck wrote:

Made one of those a while back (some details on my site). I made several changes...don't recall if that was one. Here is one thing to consider.
On the sides, the apron sets back from the leg by about 1/16". In the front, the apron is flush so as not to mess up the drawer. This detail gives the finished table a nice, traditional look. Too much or too little would (IMHO) have a big impact on the end product. Changing the thickness of the apron may require you to adjust other "things" to get the end result you're looking for.
--
Larry G. Laminger
http://woodworks.laminger.com
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If you are concerned about the strength of a finished product, that extra 1/16 on an apron isn't worth the extra aggravation of working in sixteenth's.
3/4 aprons are fine to use.
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
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Woodsmith often tends to "simplfy" things, often at the expense of clarity. In this case, I think they're simplifying by letting you use stock as it would typically come from a dealer, rather than making you plane it (as Mike Hide states, dealers typically sell 4/4 rough lumber planed to 13/16 when it's sold surfaced, the idea notionally being that the end user can plane/sand the extra 16th off to remove any handling marks).
Since 3/4 is the "normal" dimension to design around, it would have been good of Woodsmith to at least mention what they were doing, and thus avoid the confusion you experienced. Certainly, if you have 3/4 stock on hand you could use that. You may need to adjust dimensions elsewhere in that case, altho odds are the difference will be 1/32nd, which probably isn't going to be important.
John
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I appreciate your help on this. I had intended to plane it down to 3/4", since the DW735 that I have has a postive stop at 3/4", so I could make sure that all of my boards were identical. When I looked the cut list over closer I noticed the 13/16" dimension. I bought the stock roughsawn and it seemed to vary around 7/8". I was concerned about getting everything milled to 13/16".
It also made it more straightforward to make 1/4" tenons with 1/4" shoulders.
Thanks again for your input, Tom Wojeck
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