Protecting Oak Tabletop

We have an oak table in our kitchen which we use for meals on a daily basis. We use placemats for our plates. However, my child placed a really hot muffin on the wood and it left this circle on the table that can be seen from certain angles. The table has a beautiful grain and I don't want to cover it with a table cloth. However, I would also like to protect it from future accidents. What can I apply to make clean ups easy? Currently, I just wipe off the table with a slightly damp cloth and then apply Pledge every other day. I don't see this as any protection to the table really...Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
MG
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Since you are using the table heavily you probably are not interested in a "hand rubbed finish " that will require upkeep. I would go with a water based poly. It's easy to apply , touch up and redo if you need to. You can go with a high gloss to help bring out the wood's details.
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wrote:

Howdy,
Unfortunately, it would seem that you have applied gallons of Pledge to the table already.
Because of that, tt might well be very tricky to apply a real wood finish over it without making things look much worse (if the finish penetrated in some places but not others.)
Also, there is the possibility that the mark from the hot muffin might be something called "bloom." That is just water vapor that becomes trapped within the finish of wood.
If it is bloom, you might find that it vanishes over a week or so.
P.S. Stop the Pledge. <g>
All the best,
--
Kenneth

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Good point. I would use a quality wood cleaner to remove old wax, Pledge, etc. before applying a finish.
On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 16:53:32 -0500, Kenneth

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The table most likely has a lacquer finish on it now (which I think is prone to the damage described). Why would another coat of lacquer have to "penetrate"? Penetrate into what?
Is there a way to remove the built up silicone oil due to the pledge use on the surface of the finish? Maybe mineral spirits? I'm not sure.
Do a google search on "Padding Lacquer" to repair the damage once the silicone oil has been removed.

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"stoutman" wrote in message

Flexner's book has some steps for getting rid of silicone on wood. Washing with tri-sodium phosphate and water, sealing it in with #1 shellac, dusting with very light coats of nitrocellulose lacquer, or adding silicone oil to the new finish to even out the surface tension, are some of the methods.
Never tried it, but it sounds as if it is a trial and error, combination of the above, operation.
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Removing silicone contamination is much easier to say than accomplish. Even stripping will not necessarily remove it. This is one of the things that make overcoating an existing finish a real gamble.
Having said that, a really good washing is the place to start. Lots of fresh rags or cleaning cloths is a must so you don't end up simply spreading the silicone around. Sealing with shellac can work but only if it is sprayed. Brushing it on only serves to stir the contamination to the top of the seal coat. Adding "fisheye" remover to the top coat can also help but too much serves to make the coat soft and it can also act as a retarder.
One or all of these things may have to be used. You can always see if it works by wiping on some mineral spirits or alcohol. If it suddenly pulls back leaving "dry spots" you still have contamination.
Good Luck.
To reply directly, remove both NGs.

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I recall reading that the "remover" merely is silicone. Wrong?
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You are correct but like any polymer, there are many different types of silicone. The types in fisheye remover work best for its task. They are also in a carrier that is suited to being added to lacquer, varnish, etc.

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