Problem using Akeda DT jig

I purchased and Akeda jig a few months ago (lots of raves on the new group). I have begun using it to build a bunch of drawers for kitchen cabinets. My first set of 10 drawers came out perfect. They were made from solid birch. I was not so lucky on the second set of drawers. The sides are 1/2" baltic birch and the front and back are 3/4" baltic birch. A front board will finish the drawers.
I made some tests to establish the height of the bit and got it "just right" after a couple of tries. I then proceeded to do the half blind joints for the first 5 drawers. I cut the tails in the sides for all five drawers. Then I switched to the pins on the five sets of front and back pieces for the drawers. I was very disappointed to find that the joints did not fit correctly. The tails do not mate tightly to the pins - there is a 1/16 inch gap; i.e., the is a gap holding the two pieces apart by 1/16 inch.
I checked the pieces with my test pieces. The tails in the drawer sides fit perfectly with the pins in my test pieces. Something went wrong when I cut the pins on the front and back pieces. My first thought was that the router bit dropped or the router depth changed. But, it would have happened just as I changed from tails to pins - too much of a coincidence! The guides are all at the same height and are in there tight.
Anybody got suggestions on what I did wrong?
Len
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Bummer :-(
It has been too long since I've used that jig to know for sure. Things that come to mind are... - Material thickness variance - Router bit heat expansion (not so plausable) - Some chips under the base plate or in the clamp space during initial setup.
Just an FYI that in production shops using Baltic, we always puttied with white putty and sanded out any dovetails or box joints and it actually looks really great.
BW

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Put the test piece that fits correctly back in and try to figure out what's different? I only do through dovetails so I can't be of much use.
Kevan at Akeda is very helpful.
-Kevin
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Assuming you did nothing wrong and the bit depth is still correct, the stock could have been warped and was not clamped "flat" in the jig. This would be a problem with most any jig.
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snipped-for-privacy@uiuc.edu wrote:

Did you plane the stock for the test and the final in the same run? A slight thickness difference can really muck up a router cut dovetail.
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On Sun, 2 Nov 2008 07:34:48 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@uiuc.edu"

Len,
Do you have a complete set of Akeda bits and bushings?
On one of my first go rounds with the jig I used the wrong straight bit (the 0.350-Inch box joint bit instead of the .315-Inch bit). This would be the FIRST thing I would check as the results were EXACTLY as you describe.
The full akeda bushing set also includes oversized and undersized bushings. Using the wrong one could also give you a possible same result. -Chef Juke "EVERYbody Eats when they come to MY house!" http://www.chefjuke.com
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But he was doing half-blind, which doesn't use a straight bit.
-Kevin
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On Nov 3, 9:32am, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

D'Oh!
Yep. yer right. So it shouldn't be a BIT issue, but could still be a bushing issue....
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It can't be the bushing. The test was done with pieces of baltic birch from the same sheet and the same bushing. If it were the bushing, the test pieces would have failed too. Not so?
I didn't plane the baltic birch, but it is right on in thickness.
I'm thinking that the boards for the pins did not go in correctly; possibly something got stuck in there. I did clamp them pretty tight.
I will get back to it in a couple of days and report back on it.
Thanks for all suggestions
Len ------
Chef Juke wrote:

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I for one will be looking for it. I have the Akeda as well, and for one reason after another have not been able to get it out and get it benched for testing.
Let us know what you find out!
Robert
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I do NOT own an Akeda, but a Leigh instead, and have cut countless half blind dovetails over the years.
That said, it would appear that the same "depth of cut" issue is in play for cutting the pins of half blind dovetails with either jig:
With the Leigh, "depth of cut" is the deciding factor when cutting pins on whether the half blind dovetails joint is loose or tight ... sounds like your bit may have slipped.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
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Swingman wrote:

Late to another thread but my vote is for Swingman's answer.
Remember, you're using 1/4" diameter shank bitS (unless you got the 8mm shanks - and collet) and the shanks are longer than regular router bits in order to work in any of the dovetail jigs. And the dovetail bit wants to pull DOWN as it cuts.
The other possible source, or contributing factor is ply vs solid wood. Ply has a fair amount of glue which tends to dull cutting edges faster than most woods. Dull edges mean more downward force. And the faster you try and make the cut the more the downward force.
Did you make the cuts in four or five passes or just a full plunge and then lateral movement?
charlie b
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I hadn't thought of the downward pull. The bit is still sharp and I made about 3 or 4 passes to route the joints. I will look at the bit height tonight.
Thanks Len -------
charlieb wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@uiuc.edu wrote:

Might want to put some lacquer thinner on a Q-tip and clean both the collet and the inside of where it fits.
It's the less than obvious things that often raise hell - or in this case perhaps a router bit.
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I finally found some time to resolve the problem. After looking over the original incorrectly routed pieces I decided that it was a gradual change in some setting. The only possibilities were the router height adjustment and the collet. I bought a new collet. It is much tighter than the old one - so there must have been a lot of wear over the years. I have been routing dove tails for the last few days with no problems.
Case Closed (finally)
Len
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snipped-for-privacy@uiuc.edu wrote:

Sounds like you cut the tails too deep, or the pins not deep enough.
Chris
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