Power for tablesaw in shop?

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Initiated a new woodworking shop endeavor last week and have "anything goes" on electrical from the contractor and wonder where the "typical" power source is for the TS whether 110V or 220V. Currently have 110V TS and it was plugged into a ceiling receptacle and was happy with that not having to step over a cord on the floor but inquiring minds wonder what other alternatives exist. Got the X10 for dust collection that was utilizing the same circuit and enjoyed it muchly. Small compressor can use either voltage but will probably convert to 220V for efficiency. Shop/garage will be 24X30 with 9' ceilings with half bath and drain board/sink adjacent and 3 windows with 18' garage door and person door. Anxiously awaiting completion! Anxiously awaiting responses also.
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On Sun, 03 Sep 2006 11:53:24 -0400, nospambob wrote:

When I built my shop, I had the power for the table saw come up through the floor. This keeps the power cord completely out of the way. The top of the table saw is free of a hanging cord so does not interfer with any size wood project.
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It probably depends on how much you use it. I inherited my dads wood working equipment, and most of it is 220v but, he used it a good portion of every day, so it made sense to have it on 220v for the savings on electricity. I will say they are more powerful than before he made the motor switch, you just can't lug down the belt sander, and the table saw is like a hot knife through butter. I don't know if he upped the HP when he made the change, but they are sweet machines now.
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AFAIK, there is no energy savings to be had, running 220(240?) instead of 110/120. There may be less voltage drop when running 220, but no energy savings.
DAGS for "120v 240v difference", and have fun. :)
Clint

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Yes the amperage is cut in half because it's split between two circuts not because your drawing halve the wattage. The wattage stays the same and that is what your paying for.
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The wattage used by the motor would stay the same, if the voltage to the motor were the same, although even this is ignoring resistive losses within the motor. But the phrase "There may be less voltage drop when running 220, but no energy savings." does not make much sense: The voltage drop amounts to turning electricity into heat in the wiring, wiring in the building and in the power cord etc., and it unless you want to count that toward heating the building it is exactly enery lost, so if there is less of it at 220 then there is energy saved. There are lots of details if you want to go into them, such as the back-emf generated by the motor and how that falls off with load, but overall more of the electricity you are paying for will go into making sawdust at 220 than at 110. Going back to the first sentence, note that a different voltage drop makes for different voltage to the motor, so nothing here is simple. Bob Wilson

that
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To continue what Rich said, around here we pay for electrical power by the kilowatt-hour. Wattage = voltage * amps. So if your tablesaw draws 15 amps at 120v (15A * 120V = 1800W), it's the same as 7.5A @ 240V (7.5A * 240V 1800W) in terms of actual power used, and therefore cost.
BTW, when replying to (and quoting) someone else's post, it's poor practice to include the same quote identifier in front of your text. Makes it hard to pick out what you're trying to say. This is simply my opinion, unlike some people who will try to what an "Internet Standard" is (regarding top/bottom posting).
Clint

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amps
Since the same size wire will carry the same amount of amps at either voltage, and voltage is what drops as wire runs get longer you tend to get more power to the motor if you opt for the higher voltage.
Also if you take it to the next step and run the motors on 3 phase power (assuming it is available) you get a bigger bang for your buck.
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Roger Shoaf

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Watts equals amps times volts.
Lets see. Twice the volts, and half the amps. Multiply by two, and then multiply by 0.5.... see what happens. Try it yourself, it's a real surprise.
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Christopher A. Young
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@earthlink.net says...

Yes, amperage is cut in half but since power is product of amps and volts, watts are still same. My electric Co. bills on watts (kilowatts). Does yours bill on amperage?
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It may not be a large difference, but higher voltage transmission lines will lose less energy to heat than lower voltage ones over distance. The same could be said for an AC motor winding.
In theory, the power output of a motor running 15A at 120v is identical to the same rig running 7.5A at 240v, but in practice, this is not the case. As the load increases, efficiency declines and the motor will draw more energy from the mains in order to complete its task. the higher voltage motor will also suffer from this, but to a lesser degree. This is why you see large scale industrial motors running at higher voltages (and lower amperages), rather than using something like 120v/50A. I doubt that the savings in electrical cost will be enormous, but over time it will add up (or subtract up, down, whatever :)
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Yep. Probably save you $1.00 per year.
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And the savings have been already lost on the whole conversation even at a $1/hour we have spent more time on this than the savings! Now I like teflon tape to seal water fittings.........
LOL Happy Labor Day
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Work is accomplished by watts. You pay for watts, not amps. There is no savings with 220 volts.
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Christopher A. Young
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I would say most, including me simply, use an extension cord. I have used an extension cord since 1981. In 1999 I upgraded to a cabinet saw and use a 10-3 extension cord 30' long. I have never tripped over either. Until I have a larger shop with a stationary and permanent position for the saw, I will continue using the extension cord.
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Can't address the power question, but if this is a 'clean paper' setup and the slab hasn't been poured yet, I'd tuck a 3x3 shower stall in that half bath, especially if there is a SWMBO in the picture. If you are doing a big project and get all sweaty and sawdust covered, they get real cranky when you track that into the house. If this fancy shop isn't at home, it is real nice to be able to clean up before meeting people for dinner.
aem sends....
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run conduit in floor install floor outlets for fixed tools like table saw.
install at least a 100 amp sub panel for your new shop with lots of convenience outlets.
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And it's be good to have a phone in there too. Maybe one of those you can answer without touching it.

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While we are dreaming, don't forget the separate room, with the big screen TV, surround sound and a pool table! Oops! Don't forget the beer fridge and wet bar too! Greg
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