PM 66 adjustment help

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After moving, I find the 90 degree tilt blade position is off (~ 89 deg) with the blade in the stops. The manual refers to all screws and bolts as screws and bolts, with no clue as to what their function is. Google is no help. Can someone tell me the item numbers in the illustrated parts list which correspond to the 90 and 45 degree stop settings?
Thanks.
TinWoodsmn
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I don't have an exploded view drawing of the PM66 so I can't tell you which item numbers correspond to the blade tilt stops. You can just peer down into the saw while tilting the blade to see where they are as you tilt the blade.
Some people like using the stops. Personally, I prefer to back them off so that the blade will tilt beyond 90 and 45. I find it easier to check the angle of the blade than to trust the adjustment of the stops. Feel free to send me email if you need more help.
Thanks, Ed Bennett snipped-for-privacy@ts-aligner.com
http://www.ts-aligner.com Home of the TS-Aligner
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Ed, do you really find it easier to check the angle every time you tilt the blade to 90 or 45 degrees over simply going to the stops? Or, do you find that it is more accurate to check each time and not trust the stops on your saw? ;~)
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I can't speak for Ed, but for me it is NOT an issue of 'what is easier', but rather an issue of what is better/more reliable.
I'm not sure about your saw Leon, but my stops are prone to picking up saw dust. I never rely on my stops. Mine are backed off like Ed described and I check for alignment before and during project sessions.
--
www.garagewoodworks.com



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GarageWoodworks wrote:

I have never had to readjust the stops on my PM66, except for when I have moved it and done a complete alignment. It has never been a problem.
It should be pretty easy to figure out how to do it, but if the OP still needs it, I do have the original manual around and will do what I can to help. However, it seems to me that about 3 or 4 years ago I was able to dl one from the website. Perhaps it is no longer there.
Harvey
Harvey
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Nor should it be, that's why many of us go with the more expensive less fussy equipment.
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Which is what I was getting at, easier is not necessarily what gets it done on all equipment. I could hrdly see how taking extra steps would be easier than not.

My old saw had so much flex in the side panel that you could change the bevel angle by pushing on the side of the saw. I no longer have that problem, I upgraded to a saw that produces repeatable results with it's fixed settings, thank goodness. ;~)
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"Leon" wrote in message

The stops on my Unisaw have always been repeatable to within 1/10 of a degree (measured with a digital angle gauge that has proven accurate enough for woodshop purposes) even after hard use and between cleanings.
Nonetheless I always verify after making any change to blade tilt.
What I like about relying on stops, with verification, is that it more or less forces that old principle of always approaching a mechanical setting from the same direction to mitigate slack in the mechanism.
--
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Last update: 11/4/07
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I verify by checking the fit. ;~)
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"Leon" wrote

Me too ... if my Starret fits snug to the blade, we're good to go. ;)
--
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Last update: 11/4/07
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I find it easier and more accurate. For me, there's nothing easy about trusting the stops and then finding out sometime later that they were inaccurate. After a couple of decades, I have learned that it's always easier to do something right the first time. Certainly, there are those situations where I might not need the accuracy (bird houses, picnic tables, pukey ducks, etc.) and I can just use the scale on the machine.
Ed Bennett snipped-for-privacy@ts-aligner.com
http://www.ts-aligner.com Home of the TS-Aligner
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Since you have just moved the saw I would suggest that you make sure that no debris has fallen down onto the stop and perhaps prevent the blade from being adjusted to on extreme or the other. IMHO it does not seem likely that the saw would have lost its adjustment in that regard.
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The manual can be found here - adjustments on pg 12... http://power.forest.net/wmhtool/PMWood/Manuals/CurrentManuals/M-0460231-66.pdf -- JeffB remove no.spam. to email
TinWoodsmn wrote:

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Yep, that's the baby!
BTW - I hate the splitter that came with the saw. Has anybody designed a better one?
Harvey
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I put an Excalibur splitter on mine. I love the quick-release feature. It did take a bit of work to fit it, because it requires you to cut off a cylindrical protrusion from beneath the top casting. Also, there is apparentlly quite a bit of variation from saw to saw (talking PM66, here) because my splitter mount bracket did not fit properly out of the box. I called them, and after taking a couple of measurements, they sent me (overnight) a replacement that fit perfectly.
I'm not affiliated with them in any way. I'm just a very satisfied customer.
Regards, John.

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It does look easier to put on and take off, but I would really like one of those that attach just behind the blade and go up and down with it. There's a word for it, but I can't think of it.
Harvey the_tool_man wrote:

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Riving Knife
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Leon wrote:

Thanks, Leon. Are you aware of any good ones for the PM66? It seems that many say you can not mount one to this saw. I took a quick look and see that there is a bolt behind the blade and seems to be attached to the trunnions. Can't that be used?
Harvey
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No sir, I am not a ware of "any" that are aftermarket, but if you find one, letme know too.
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You're thinking of a riving knife.
I, too, wanted a riving knife. A search of the aftermarket revealed no such thing available for a PM66. I looked into building one of my own, but I couldn't figure out any way to make one rigid enough to be effective, that would fit in the space available within the saw. The arbor bearings are pressed into a rough casting with no flat mounting surface anywhere near the blade. Also, the back of the blade comes very close to the rear trunnion as it retracts, leaving very little room for any sort of riving knife. The design I came up with would have interfered with the table insert for beveled cuts, so I gave up at that point.
In practice, the removable splitter works the same as long as you aren't making a blind cut. I don't know about other saws, but on a PM66, because of the design of the blade height mechanism, the back edge of the blade is close to the splitter throughout most of it's adjustment above the table surface, so the splitter comes into play right after the start of the cut. For blind cuts, at least for the ones I do, they are either very shallow, and the risk of the wood binding on the blade is small, or they are made with a dado blade, in which case a riving knife would be ineffective. Again, to me, what makes it effective is the ease with which it can be removed and replaced. This means I will use it every time, rather than hanging it on the wall or something.
FWIW, the Excalibur comes with anti-kickback pawls that are very effective. I also use a pair of board buddies and an assortment of push sticks to minimize the possibility of kickback and the consequences thereof.
Regards, John.

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