Plywood for utility trailer.

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I couldn't resist. Gloatable. HAD to buy it. All metal in excellent condition, new(er) tires, lights, wiring all in tip-top condition...BUT.... The previous owner had built a box from?? . . . wait for it . . . flake board. (OSB without the nice binders..like cheap, aspenite) It appears to have started out at 3/4", now WELL over 1 1/2".. swollen somewhat..and totally delaminated. The whole box came apart with a snow shovel. Now... for new material. What do we like? (No, Lew, NOT mahogany marine ply <G>)
I'm open to suggestions, even those including a painted finish of some sort. Doesn't have to be pretty.
TIA!
r
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MDO. Tom Robatoy wrote:

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T-111 siding
Robatoy wrote:

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This is what I used. As cheap as it can get and the lines added some character to the box sides. No paint or finish at all and now 5 or more years later it is holding up great.
--
********
Bill Pounds
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Robatoy wrote:

Really nice near-marine ply, with a weatherproof plastic laminate on each side.
Cheap too - it comes from the scrapyard where they break truck trailers.
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Painted CDX. I've had mine on a little trailer for 5+ years. Left outside daily. Still solid. If you want a bullet proof bed, and hate money, Ipe.
Dave
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wrote:

That's the first thought I had as well....3/4inch CDX....weather-proof, durable, sanded one side, reasonable price.

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And my big mouth says . . . why a 'box' ??
Sounds like it becomes a 'permanent fixture' so that when traveling empty is causes drag and kills the gas mileage {YES - I'm a cheap SOB !!}.
I have 2 of those utility trailers. The 'big' one uses a 4x8 ply sheet as a bed, and folds for storage. Rather then cut the ply, I spend a few more minutes and un-bolt the bed before folding. I like the extra support of the full sheet, and I like the foldability that allows storage against the outside wall of the shop. The ply goes behind it and a 'Green Tarp' goes over all.
While I couldn't do that with a 'box' on it, sometimes it is nice when you need to move bulk material, or things that 'roll' . . . like 100 and 150 pound 'Mushroom Anchors'. I used basic grade 2x4's for the upright's and #2 common 1x4's for the 'slats'. Assembled with SS screws and 'Hot Galvanized' bolts, washers, & nuts. For storage, the pieces fit between the folded trailer and the bed, up against the wall, with a 'safety cable' attached between two eye bolts.
I did this when Joanne wanted a 2/3rds of a 'load' of garden soil - a full load {3 'scoops'}was delivered free, anything less was $28 - minimum. A 'scoop' was about 500 lbs, she wanted two - the trailer has an 1100 lb capacity. Made the 'cattle car' sides. Went to the garden center, 'lined' the contraption with a cheap Blue tarp {big enough that it lapped over the top, all around}, attached cheap, flat rubber pseudo-bungees to the 'left-long' bolts at the corners {to keep everything tight}, and told the loader operator to, 'Fill'er Up !!'. Drove home no problem and no 'dribbles'. Even used my 'hand mover' to position the trailer so we could get the wheelbarrow next to it {This soil was for the raised-bed veggie garden}. Un-hooked one side and pulled it out. Tarp flopped down and 'captured' what soil gravity helped out. The rest was easy - a relative term - we are talking about 1,000 pounds of dirt moved across the yard by wheelbarrow . . .
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop
{PS - the bed is a 'scrap' piece of 3/4 ply. It is still covered with glue as it was covered with a rug and used as the top of a low 'presentation platform'. If I had to buy something - it would be a sheet of 3/4 PT ply}

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I bought an inexpensive 4X8 utility trailer about 2 years ago. It required DIY deck and sides . Originally I wanted to use PT plywood for the decki but HD I went to didn't have any. (Apparently not as common as in the past?) Anyway, I just bought a sheet of exterior BC yellow pine and a gallon of exterior deck stain from the "oops" bin. Put the stain on top and bottom. At 2 years it is holding up well, only thing I've done is touch up a few spots where cargo badly gouged the plywood. Sorry I can't remember the brand of stain but I believe I just selected what seemed to be the best quality from the shelf; maybe something form Cuprinol or Olympia.
--
No dumb questions, just dumb answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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Robatoy wrote:
> Now... for new material. What do we like? (No, Lew, NOT mahogany marine > ply <G>)
Time for some 3/4" CDX plywood, and epoxy thickened with micro-balloons.
Use the thickened epoxy to fill and repair surface defects in the CDX (Both Sides).
All bolt holes get drilled oversize, then filled with thickened epoxy and finally thru drilled for bolt after curing.
As a example, for a 1/4" bolt, drill a 3/4" hole thru ply, then fill with epoxy. When cured, drill a 5/16" hole thru epoxy.
Seal with a good oil based primer followed by finish of choice.
Good for at least 10 years, even in Sarnia.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Where am I going to find the time to tie all those micro strings to the micro balloons, Lew?
nyuk
r
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Use 3/4" pressure treated plywood. It holds up very well to water, heavy weight, dragging something across it etc. Don't paint it, leave the surface raw. I've had pressure treated plywood trailer bottoms last for over 15 years.
Bob

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Robatoy wrote:

Some wood dealers in my area sell lower grade white oak "truck decking".
Making a floor and side frames out of white oak would be durable in all respects. An option would be to add removable side sheathing with exterior ply, sheet aluminum, etc...
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Robatoy wrote:

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You can get pressure treated but I would think just regular garden variety 3/4" A/C would work just fine.
You could paint it or not....
The other choice is 5/4 decking boards which is a bigger pain to install but will last three times longer.
The final and ultimate is PT 2x6 bolted on... they will be there when the trailer is toast.
Robatoy wrote:

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I have an inexpensive utility trailer I bought about 17 years ago. At the time, I just bolted on standard 3/4" AC plywood. 17 years later, and it still looks and feels solid. Very worn and abused, but solid.
On the other hand, I had built some sides out of 1/2" CDX plywood and 2x4's. Because of the trailer size and the way the sides were constructed, I had to take the sides off the trailer to carry plywood and other sheet goods. So, the sides sat out on the ground a lot. It only took about 5 years for them to rot away to practically nothing. :)
So, I rebuilt the sides with PT lumber and 1/2" PT plywood. I also built them in a way that let me permanently attach them and still be able to carry sheetgoods. Another 12 years or so, and they still look like the day I built them, except for the scratches and dings from carrying things.

That's my plan when my 3/4" AC floor finally goes.
Anthony
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HerHusband wrote:
>> The final and ultimate is PT 2x6 bolted on... they will >> be there when the trailer is toast. > > That's my plan when my 3/4" AC floor finally goes.
Thought Apitong <s/p> was the wood of choice for truck beds.
Lew
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Pat Barber

Anthony
Lew Hodgett

It is. Most of the truck beds and side rails are made from Apitong. A very strong and durable wood. Many call it Philippine Mahogany witch is incorrect. The absolute best (IMHO) would be Ipe. Stronger, heaver and more durable - costs more! But this is a utility trailer. No need for anything better than plain old CDX and paint, and even the paint is optional.
Dave
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HerHusband wrote:

I used 3/4 WBP for the floor in mine, and scrap garage doors for the sides - 8ft of corrugated galvanised steel ready cut into 18in strips(?)
Bolted on with 1" roofing bolts.
Quite a bit more resilient and lighter than ply - useful in the UK since max trailer weight (including load) on a standard car licence is 3300lbs (1500kgs).
--
BigEgg
Hack to size. Hammer to fit. Weld to join. Grind to shape. Paint to cover.
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Wed, Oct 18, 2006, 1:51pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@topworks.ca (Robatoy) came in and mumbled: <snip> Gloatable. <snip>
What's the gloatable part?
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
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