Planes

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http://www.planemaker.com /
They will knock your socks off.
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Let me start with the #45 (or #55 if you want the Cadillac model) Like a chisel plane, it has no "mouth" and no "chip breaker", both needed for fine, controlled shavings. THAT means that the wood must be as close to MDF as you can find because the iron WILL try and follow the grain. Not a problem when cutting "downhill" - but if the grain changes direction and you start cutting "uphill" . . .
I picked up an old #45 at one of the City of Austin Garage Sales - for a wopping $80. Also picked up the T&G plane with the flip around fence (fence in position 1 to cut the groove, flip it around and cut one side of the tongue then go to the other side of the board and cut the other side. Spent lots and lots of time getting all the "irons" flat backed and sharp and still had "challenges" getting them to work - even adequately.
But if you want to dabble a bit before jumping in with both feet, check out the LN Beading Tool. It's a beautiful shiny bronze spoke shave like tool with a set of neat scraper/scratcher type cutters that'll do beads and half round grooves, etc.
For the results these types of planes "do", a router bit will do it a lot better and a lot faster with better repeatability.
The larger of the two router planes is a tool that lets you fine tune the depth of a dado or rabbet/ rebate. Also comes in handy for leveling the "field"/background around a carving.
Another handy hand plane is an adjustable mouth block plane. Chamfer/ease edges, chamfer the ends of tenons to make it easier to align with a mortise etc.. Better yet, the LN Rabbet Block Plane - a block plane with a special iron that, at the bottom 3/4 of an inch, is just slightly wider than the plane body, which has openings on both sides to accomodate the special iron. Works like a block plane AND lets you trim up tenons and deepen a rabbet/rebate a little.
A much overlooked neander tool is the marking knife. Pencils are great for writing and drawing but not good enough for joint layout marks AND scribe lines can't be rubbed off - accidentally or by intent. You want a "left" and "right" single bevel knife, each with a long bevel and sharp point.
just more to confuse you
charlie b
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Charlie what about the No. 46, have you used one?
--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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AAvK wrote:

Nope.
charlie b
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