pennies prevent rust? what say ye?

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Ayup. Sometime in the 80's, as I recall. There is a *legal*requirement* that the face value of any U.S. coin, when produced, be higher than the value of the metal(s) used to make it. The price of copper had risen to the point where there was 'nearly' one cents worth of copper in a penny, and the price of copper was still climbing. Thus, something *had* to be done.
Zinc is cheaper than copper. Considerably so.
Modern pennies have a fairly thin layer of copper/tin cladding over a zinc core.
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On Tue, 02 Dec 2003 15:24:14 GMT, "Frank Ketchum"

Dip the pennies in kerosene first, then they will work.
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Neither. Just plain silly. Even if they were copper, why would copper absorb moisture? Even if they could, how much could they absorb, and why wouldn't they be saturated when you got them?
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On Tue, 02 Dec 2003 21:45:54 GMT, Toller wrote:

And that jar of pennies I have in my bedroom sure would dry out the place. I think you'd be better with some of those silica packs that come with numerous items.
Shawn
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Toller wrote:

Hey, you can introduce logical deduction into these kinds of discussions can you? It isn't fair.
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Toller wrote:

How many of your tools have copper alloy parts? Do they rust?
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On Tue, 02 Dec 2003 21:19:54 -0800, "Dr. Rev. Chuck, M.D. P.A."

most chrome plating on steel is put on over a layer of pure copper, mostly because chrome doesn't like to stick to steel, but it will stick to copper, which will stick to steel. if you cut into that, the exposed steel *will* rust.
copper alloy parsts- brass and bronze- and for that matter monel- don't rust because they are non ferrous, not because they contain copper.     Bridger
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Bridger writes:

True. And copper corrodes--oxidizes--in its own way, forming a green layer.
Charlie Self
"I have as much authority as the Pope, I just don't have as many people who believe it." George Carlin
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Chrome plant I worked in plated nickel over steel, flashed chrome over the nickel. No copper used at all.
Rick
put on over a layer of pure copper,
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I've also heard that if you put a 3-way light bulb on the dashboard of your car, it scatters the radar beam and the cops can't get your speed right.
-JBB

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Forget the pennies. You may try a charcoal briquette or two in each drawer. Charcoal will absorb the moisture.
Or you can get some packets of silica, just like you see in packing material. Usually packed with metal objects, and shipped from overseas. I think you can get them at hardware or packaging/shipping stores, like UPS.
--
Al Finnical

"...I am truly skeptical of all that I have said..."
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wrote:

I have used large pieces of chalk in a toolbox that works.
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On Tue, 02 Dec 2003 15:24:14 GMT, "Frank Ketchum"

Never.
Just plain stupid.
You should re-evaluate your inventory of friends! lol
Have a nice week...
Trent
Dyslexics of the world ... UNTIE !
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It is true. Something to do with static electricity and cathodic protection. Similar to those solar panels near bridges on the freeway keep the steel from rusting... I have had a short length of copper pipe in each drawer of my Snapon box since it was new.... NO rust on the tools at all.

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I can imagine that it works for bridges because the solar panels are electrically connected to the bridge. I might also imagine that there is a sacraficial anode somewhere. This would be similar to the way underground storage tanks are protected. I wouldn't rule out the penny trick out of hand, but if it does work, it would have to be under some special conditions. To have a chance of working, there would have to be an electrical connection between the penny, drawer, and tool. Copper might be electrically dissimilar enough to induce a voltage when in contact with steel, but I'd have to check that out.
todd

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todd wrote:

It's electrically dissimilar enough to induce a voltage when in contact with slugs and snails. :)
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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| | It is true. Something to do with static electricity and cathodic | protection.
I doubt it. You need some kind of electrical connection in any type of cathodic protection scheme. Just placing metals in close proximity won't work.
Since there's no DC power source, this would have to be a sacrificial anode system. And in order for that to work, the anode has to be more electrochemically active than the cathode. Copper is not a good choice for a sacrificial anode because it has less affinity to oxygen than many other metals, including iron. Zinc is a popular choice for a sacrificial anode.
Do you remember the Statue of Liberty restoration several years back? The copper skin was fine, but the original iron framework had corroded in many places. The iron was actually the "sacrificial" anode for the copper in that arrangement.
| I have had a short length of copper pipe in each drawer of my | Snapon box since it was new.... NO rust on the tools at all.
Is there an electrical connection between your pipe and any of the tools? If not, then you are probably not employing cathodic corrosion protection.
Is there any visible oxidation on your copper? If not, then the lack of oxidation of your steel tools is more likely due to the relative absence of moisture and/or oxygen in your tool chest, not the presence of the copper.
--Jay
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Jay Windley wrote:

There you go getting all technical and scientific. My tools don't rust because I have a bobble-head Taco Bell dog hot glued to the toolbox. It works. Prove it doesn't. :)
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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I have no copper in my tool box. No rust at all. I figure it is the lack of copper in the tool box that results in no rust.
solarman wrote:

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Frank,
A few have danced close but I don't think anyone has nailed it yet. So here's my two cents...
I suspect that the tool corrosion could be due to the dissimilar metals in the tool box reacting with moisture and salt to produce a mild acid, enough to get a small current flowing and over time cause corrosion. IF the pennies work to reduce rust it is probably because of the zinc content, not the thin copper plating. IIRC it is the metal with the most available electron slots in its outer shell in the atom. Zinc has more than most metals so it is the preferred choice for a sacrificial metal.
You might consider stopping by your local marine supply store and picking up a zinc block if corrosion is a problem for you. Cost about a buck or two - more than a few pennies but it should work better (if this theory is correct) because they are not wearing a copper coat like the pennies.
-Chris
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