Ovens/Furnaces in the HSM/Woodworking Shop

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I like to bake on enamel and epoxy finishes... makes 'em nice and hard, and really does a great job with hammertone or crackle finishes.
Use dark colors.
Too_Many_Tools wrote:

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" I like to bake on enamel and epoxy finishes... makes 'em nice and hard, and really does a great job with hammertone or crackle finishes.
Use dark colors."
Thanks for the addition.
What temperatures do you use?
TMT
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Please tell me more. I am about to paint a model engine and I would really like to know how this works. Is this process benigh enough that I can do it in my kitchen oven?
I painted one model with rusteloum paint a few years ago and it took a long time with a heat lamp before the paint was hard.
I did some tests with newer rusteloum paint and it seems to harden much faster. In fact it seems to be a much better paint too.
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Might I suggest you invest in a small appliance cup, and use a commercial enamel (like Rustoleum) with some additional hardener. The hardener may be had at any automotive paint supply.
Wear breathing protection, and use lots of ventilation. The hardeners are quite toxic. But BOY do they do a nice job. The film turns as hard as crystal, and SHINES!
I did my 8N tractor this way, and even scraping live oak limbs didn't rub off the paint.
LLoyd
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Please tell me: what is a small appliance cup? Do you mean a small spray gun?
I assumed from the original posting that someone was using normal paint (maybe from a spray can) and then baking it to make it harder and more durable.
I need to paint a model Hit-and-miss engine. I want to keep it reasonably simple. Spraying with a spray can and baking in my kitchen oven is reasonably simple. Not sure I can use a normal spray gun even though I do have a couple of them. If it gets too complex, I would opt to take it to a automotive paint shop and pay them to paint it.
chuck
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Chuck Sherwood wrote:

I didn't make the original comment about baking paint, but I've have very good luck with baking high temperature engine enamel. Apply it, let it dry, then bake it for an hour at 350deg. I did this once or twice in my kitchen oven without big problems. You might want to try a small sample to find out if it smokes excessively. The result, though, is a very hard surfaced paint that wears well, and is heat resistant to boot. Comes in a spray can, no need for a gun.
--
Gary Brady
Austin, TX
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Chuck Sherwood wrote:

No, that has to do with a sporting protective device for probably meaningless small appliances.     snort,     jo4hn
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    I'll wait for others on this, as I am slightly puzzled too.

    I've done this with black wrinkle varnish. The baking (in my apartment's oven all those years ago) produced two effects:
1)    A much finer wrinkle pattern.
2)    It got much harder much quicker. Without the baking, it took     forever for the paint to get hard. With it, as soon as it     cooled down from the oven it was quite hard.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
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I don't want my paint to wrinkle. Will a non wrinkle paint still be smooth if its baked?
What temp did you use for baking? I typically use a little bondo to fill the pits in the castings. I think this will limit the max baking temp.
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    As long as you don't bake it too hot.
    It has been a long time, (this had to have happened somewhere between 1964 and 1974, while I was in that apartment).
    The wrinkle enamel was designed for the purpose. IIRC, you sprayed a rather thick coat, let it dry for fifteen minutes (or was it an hour), and then sprayed another coat of equal thickness -- while the first was still quite soft. The outer coat formed a skin which wrinkled as the underlying paint dried.
    IIRC -- the rattle can had a baking temperature listed on it.

    Whatever the label on the rattle can suggested. This has been at least thirty years ago. And the temperature would be different for different paints, anyway.

    If the composition of the paint does not limit it.
    If the rattle can's label does not suggest any baking temperature, go the the maker's web page and look for a FAQ file -- which *might* have that information.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Already tried that without any luck. I have been experimenting with rusteloum spray cans and they seem to harden much quicker now than then my previous experience. I suspect the formula is much different because the directions are also quite different.
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