OT - What the hell are we coming to?

Page 5 of 6  
LDosser wrote:

Seems somewhat gritty. Bet one walks funny for a while afterwards.

--

There is never a situation where having more rounds is a disadvantage

Rob Leatham
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Well, if you happen on some pumice ...
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On Fri, 2 Apr 2010 00:19:22 -0700, the infamous "LDosser"

Hey, Frank Klausz calls plane shavings "Hungarian paper towels". With only a tiny bit of imagination, they could become much more inviting than pumice, volcanic ash, corn cobs, or leaves, eh?
-- It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. -- Charles Darwin
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Good for burnishing woodturnings.
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On 4/1/2010 3:38 PM, Chris Friesen wrote:

One of my neighbors in Minnesota built a HUGE quonset-type building for storing corn. If the market was flooded, he unloaded it into the storage building to sell when the market was up. From what the other neighbors said, it seemed to work quite well for him. IIRC, there wasn't any government funding involved.
You might consider adding that as option 4.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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On 04/01/2010 04:41 PM, Morris Dovey wrote:

Fair enough...but that assumes you've got enough in the bank (or can borrow enough) to tide you over until the market goes back up.
Chris
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"Morris Dovey" wrote:

Still remember the rows of corrigated steel silos housing grain crops after WWII.
Silos and grain in them were the result of "Price Supports" for agriculture.
The idea was to hold the grain for better prices, but the just built more silos the next year.
Also picked potatoes that were part of the "Price Supports" for agriculture program.
Gov't would buy spuds at a supported price, then dye them purple, and sell them as hog feed for $0.01/lb.
That was over 60 years ago and not a whole lot has changed when it comes to gov't involvement in the agriculture business.
Lew
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Butler Bins! Started about 100 years ago.
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On Thu, 01 Apr 2010 14:38:25 -0600, the infamous Chris Friesen

Why don't we 4) recategorize corn raised for fuel so it doesn't skew the food prices?

While the Mexican poor go hungry from the high corn prices set about by the our government's adoption of the ghastly expensive ethanol fuel thing, which pollutes the air more due to the reduced efficiency of the vehicles it powers. That gov't is going to "fix" healthcare.
-- It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. -- Charles Darwin
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On 4/1/10 10:52 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

I totally agree with you about the ethanol myth. It take more energy to make than it produces.
However, the Mexican poor go hungry because of the Mexican government... it has very little to do with the US.
Mexico is one of the richest countries on earth, due in part to their oil resources. The richest man on earth is a Mexican in Mexico. Unfortunately, Mexico is still very much a class society. You're born rich or poor and the Government cares very little about their own poor. They tell them if they don't like living in poverty, to go to "el Norte."
Poor Mexicans are poor because of their own government's policies, not ours.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On Thu, 01 Apr 2010 23:26:54 -0500, the infamous -MIKE-

While much of what you stated is true, when the price of corn skyrockets in Mexico and people actually die of starvation because of a stupid policy our gov't has made, it's a pretty sad day. And since neither gov't seems to care, that's the true shame of it.
-- It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. -- Charles Darwin
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On 4/2/10 10:28 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Hate to be a pest, but can you cite a reference for this happening.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On Fri, 02 Apr 2010 11:39:00 -0500, the infamous -MIKE-

Yeah, I read it somewhere and will see if I can find it for you.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/22301669/ Oops, no, that's dead fish from corn growers.
http://www.godlikeproductions.com/forum1/message511394/pg1 OMG!
OK, 15 minutes of searching and no joy. I don't recall where I read it, Mike. You're on your own.
-- It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. -- Charles Darwin
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Chris Friesen wrote:

Your #3 is a contradiction. If prices are low, as in your hypothetical, that IS the market price. If the government pays more, it is interposing its judgment for the market. Every time the government intervenes in the general marketplace, wealth is destroyed. Every time. With subsidies, tariffs, taxes, regulations, inspections, and so on.
It's dirt simple. Option #1 is the ONLY effective answer.
And your conclusion that the marginal farmers will be forced out of business is wrong; only the stupid farmers will be forced out of business. Every farmer can hedge his crop's outcome by selling his anticipated crop on the futures market and/or buying insurance. Failure to anticipate and protect against unforeseen circumstances is the mark of a foolish farmer, not one ruined by the whims of fortune beyond his control.
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snipped-for-privacy@diversify.invalid wrote:

And in the 80s, several promising experimental treatments for HIV/AIDS were never tested on human volunteers because the FDA feared it would harm them --- Hellooooooo!! They're dying already! How is the treatment going to make that worse? There are effective treatments *now*, but I wonder how many lives could have been at least extended if not saved, how much pain reduced if not eliminated, if some of these treatments had been made available sooner.
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On Thu, 01 Apr 2010 22:36:05 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Sorry, but there's many things that can be worse. You're not considering possible alternatives. Such things as hastening their deaths, the possibility of dying in great discomfort and finally, possible medical complications down the road.
Thalidomide comes to mind when the medical industry has rushed a treatment into production.
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Missed the word "volunteers" didja? :-) If not for that, I'd agree with you. As it is, though, I remember people complaining at the time that they didn't *care* whether the treatment might be dangerous. Remember the time frame, too: in the 1980s, there were *no* effective treatments for HIV. Infection meant a death sentence, with a pretty short time period. And people were desperate.

Somehow I can't see experimental treatments on AIDS patients producing the same class of risks...
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On Thu, 01 Apr 2010 23:49:32 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Yup, missed that, my mistake.

Yes, I do remember the lack of effective treatment.

Maybe not, but the risk is still there. And considering the period of time that's elapsed, a similar mistake would cost a drug company many, many times more in lawsuits.
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True enough. Still, it bothers me when a researcher says, "Hey, I might have a treatment for this incurable terminal illness" and someone with that illness says "What the hell, I'm dying anyway, I'll volunteer to try it" -- and the government says, "We won't let you do that, because it's too dangerous."
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deer season. We did the right thing, field dressed it, hauled it out and reported to the game warden. When I was a little younger, deer siezed by the warden were taken to orphanages and other charitable care places, but he told us as far as he personally was concerned, we could keep it(but not by law of course). His reason was that they could no longer give the meat to ANY place that received state or federal government aid because the venison was not "inspected". The only place he could take it was the county jail, and their meat locker was already stuffed to overflowing with siezed venison.
IDIOCY!
Norm
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