OT stranger than fiction ..

A local story that defies belief ....
http://www.therecord.com/news-story/6542266-second-corduroy-road-found-near-conestoga-mall/
Our ancestors threw down some timbers to get a path through a muddy area - and it's treated like an archological find ! People lined up yesterday to get 2 foot lengths of the rotting old timbers ! Geeeesh. It's not like it was an historic building or sunken ship or something ... John T.
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snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote in

Free wood? Any of it salvagable for turning?
I might be lining up for some free turning stock... but I'm not exactly normal. :-)
Puckdropper
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On Saturday, May 7, 2016 at 7:12:34 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@googlegroups.com wrote :

Often times, simple stand-alone home decor pieces is prime, no matter what shape it's in. For a long time, I've had my eye on a partially sunken hol low log, that I like to think was drilled (holes) by an Ivorybilled Woodpec ker. Want it for shop decor. https://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/ 7101890947/in/photostream


Hmmmm! 1) I have some walnut root ball remnants (probably some burl within), from the trestle table project. I gave some to the local turners guild and sti ll have some remaining. Below is one example, that I was/am to make a lamp base with, but there are other pieces, still. They've been air drying fo r about 2-3 yrs, now. I'm not much of a turner, at all, but I was to try t urning a mallet head, to go with the table, with a piece of the remaining s tock. https://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/14089532812/in/photostream
2) Also, I recently dug up the rootball of a dead camelia shrub, roughly 10 " diameter. Discovered the ball was pretty solid, still, and seems to be burled, so I kept it. It was certainly hard wood to chop/cut, when diggin g it up. I called the local turners guild, to see if anyone would be inter ested in trying it, but got no call back. There are 2-3 pieces: 1 bowl siz e and 1-2 pen size (I think) pieces.
I can take pics to show you. Available at mailing cost, only, if you're in terested.
Sonny
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Hi Sonny,
Thanks for the offer. I think I'll pass at this time, as I'm not sure I'd be able to do anything with it (still learning) and I'm sure shipping won't be cheap. OTOH, if you're willing to ship regional flat rate shipping could be fairly reasonable.
FWIW, regional flat rate requires you to request boxes from the USPS, then purchase postage online. They're way cheaper than the nationwide one-rate boxes the USPS pushes.
Puckdropper
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On Saturday, May 7, 2016 at 6:14:23 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@googlegroups.com wrote:

Another interesting USPS shipping fact:
The USPS Click-N-Ship website does not offer a 1st class shipping option. They only offer Priority Mail, which is OK for packages that exceed the 1st class weight limits. However, since the minimum is in the $6-$7 range, that often exceeds the 1st class postage for lighter items, which is often less than $3.
If you go through PayPal Shipping, you can buy USPS 1st Class postage and create labels. Once you log into PayPal via this link, you'll have access to their shipping utility:
https://www.paypal.com/us/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_ship-now
One downside is that they do not appear to have any type of "Address Book" feature like the Click-N-Ship site. You have to enter the shipping address manually each time. I send small items to my out-of-town kids on occasion and I wish I could save their addresses. However, saving $3-$4 each time is well worth the extra effort.
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On 5/7/2016 10:18 AM, Sonny wrote:

I would question whether all of the holes are caused by woodpeckers. From the arrangement of the holes it looks like it was a main beam in a barn (?) where the other members of the frame structure were placed in the pockets in the main beam.
I have seen similar beams in old barns, old cover bridges, and old mills.
_____ As for the archeological excitement of an old corduroy road. These are mention frequently in old diaries and accounts of early transportation.
While historian have a general idea of how a corduroy road was constructed. it is good to see actual examples of the roads in archeological digs. This gives us a better understanding as to what they were, and the time it would take for their construction.
Roads are the basis for any community. Knowing the actual location of the original roads in a community are basic to understanding how the community was organized and how it grew.
A piece of a corduroy road would be like the brick from my elementary school that I have in my garage; worthless but nice to have for the memories that are represented by the building it came from.
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Well seasoned. Stable - maybe. Might be wet and have to dry...
They did the same thing across the desert. They made fences that were connected along the top and bottom and used them flat on the ground. At first they tried snow fence but the lathe was to thin. So railroad ties were used and cars and trucks rode above the sand.
Man moves ahead.
Martin
On 5/7/2016 7:12 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

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